Tagged: world

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Homeland Security part of the fight against opioids in Central Ohio

COLUMBUS, Ohio — 

With the high number of opioid deaths across the country, the Department of Homeland Security is heavily involved in trying to fight this epidemic. The Resident Agent In Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Columbus says Central Ohio has been the epicenter of the heroin epidemic.

“It’s coming through here. What’s going to the east coast, to Chicago, to Pittsburgh. It’s the crossroads of America here in Central Ohio, ” said Nathan Emery.

To combat the drugs flowing through our city, agents have formed unique partnerships with local law enforcement.

“Day in and Day out our agents are embedded with state and local law enforcement officers. We work it from the ground up,” Emery said.

Agents have seized not only drugs but guns and money.

“We have cases where we’ve worked it up from the street level buys and take down full cells here in Central Ohio, ” said Emery.

Last year agents seized more than $15 million in drug money. Their efforts caught the eye of Hollywood, and now HSI and Franklin County’s Hope Task Force are both spotlighted in Showtime’s docu-series “The Trade.” Cameras followed investigators for six months as part of the show.

“It was a little surreal having cameras in your face around the clock,” said Emery.

The show gives viewers an inside look into how these agencies are going after the dealers.

“There’s no place they can hide in the country or in the world for that matter, ” said Emery. “We’re able to take our tools, especially from Homeland Security Investigations and go after these organizations in their home countries.”

Bottom line, they say they’re refusing to let the drug war win.

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Homeland Security part of the fight against opioids in Central Ohio

COLUMBUS, Ohio — 

With the high number of opioid deaths across the country, the Department of Homeland Security is heavily involved in trying to fight this epidemic. The Resident Agent In Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Columbus says Central Ohio has been the epicenter of the heroin epidemic.

“It’s coming through here. What’s going to the east coast, to Chicago, to Pittsburgh. It’s the crossroads of America here in Central Ohio, ” said Nathan Emery.

To combat the drugs flowing through our city, agents have formed unique partnerships with local law enforcement.

“Day in and Day out our agents are embedded with state and local law enforcement officers. We work it from the ground up,” Emery said.

Agents have seized not only drugs but guns and money.

“We have cases where we’ve worked it up from the street level buys and take down full cells here in Central Ohio, ” said Emery.

Last year agents seized more than $15 million in drug money. Their efforts caught the eye of Hollywood, and now HSI and Franklin County’s Hope Task Force are both spotlighted in Showtime’s docu-series “The Trade.” Cameras followed investigators for six months as part of the show.

“It was a little surreal having cameras in your face around the clock,” said Emery.

The show gives viewers an inside look into how these agencies are going after the dealers.

“There’s no place they can hide in the country or in the world for that matter, ” said Emery. “We’re able to take our tools, especially from Homeland Security Investigations and go after these organizations in their home countries.”

Bottom line, they say they’re refusing to let the drug war win.

0

Homeland Security part of the fight against opioids in Central Ohio

COLUMBUS, Ohio — 

With the high number of opioid deaths across the country, the Department of Homeland Security is heavily involved in trying to fight this epidemic. The Resident Agent In Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Columbus says Central Ohio has been the epicenter of the heroin epidemic.

“It’s coming through here. What’s going to the east coast, to Chicago, to Pittsburgh. It’s the crossroads of America here in Central Ohio, ” said Nathan Emery.

To combat the drugs flowing through our city, agents have formed unique partnerships with local law enforcement.

“Day in and Day out our agents are embedded with state and local law enforcement officers. We work it from the ground up,” Emery said.

Agents have seized not only drugs but guns and money.

“We have cases where we’ve worked it up from the street level buys and take down full cells here in Central Ohio, ” said Emery.

Last year agents seized more than $15 million in drug money. Their efforts caught the eye of Hollywood, and now HSI and Franklin County’s Hope Task Force are both spotlighted in Showtime’s docu-series “The Trade.” Cameras followed investigators for six months as part of the show.

“It was a little surreal having cameras in your face around the clock,” said Emery.

The show gives viewers an inside look into how these agencies are going after the dealers.

“There’s no place they can hide in the country or in the world for that matter, ” said Emery. “We’re able to take our tools, especially from Homeland Security Investigations and go after these organizations in their home countries.”

Bottom line, they say they’re refusing to let the drug war win.

0

Homeland Security part of the fight against opioids in Central Ohio

COLUMBUS, Ohio — 

With the high number of opioid deaths across the country, the Department of Homeland Security is heavily involved in trying to fight this epidemic. The Resident Agent In Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Columbus says Central Ohio has been the epicenter of the heroin epidemic.

“It’s coming through here. What’s going to the east coast, to Chicago, to Pittsburgh. It’s the crossroads of America here in Central Ohio, ” said Nathan Emery.

To combat the drugs flowing through our city, agents have formed unique partnerships with local law enforcement.

“Day in and Day out our agents are embedded with state and local law enforcement officers. We work it from the ground up,” Emery said.

Agents have seized not only drugs but guns and money.

“We have cases where we’ve worked it up from the street level buys and take down full cells here in Central Ohio, ” said Emery.

Last year agents seized more than $15 million in drug money. Their efforts caught the eye of Hollywood, and now HSI and Franklin County’s Hope Task Force are both spotlighted in Showtime’s docu-series “The Trade.” Cameras followed investigators for six months as part of the show.

“It was a little surreal having cameras in your face around the clock,” said Emery.

The show gives viewers an inside look into how these agencies are going after the dealers.

“There’s no place they can hide in the country or in the world for that matter, ” said Emery. “We’re able to take our tools, especially from Homeland Security Investigations and go after these organizations in their home countries.”

Bottom line, they say they’re refusing to let the drug war win.

0

Middle East Governments Are Cutting Their Military Budgets Even As Wars Rage Around The Region

Military spending in the Middle East has fallen over the past year, despite a string of ongoing conflicts across the region, including those in Iraq, Libya, Syria and Yemen.

According to data published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) on February 14, total spending across the region fell to $167bn in 2017, down 4% from $174bn the year before. Measured by a number of other metrics, the fall was even faster. Defence spending on a per capita basis was down 5% to $388 while spending as a percentage of the region’s GDP dropped from 5.73% of GDP in 2016 to 5.4% last year.

These figures don’t capture all the countries in the region – in its Military Balance 2018 report, IISS says it has no reliable information for the defence budgets of a number of likely high-spending countries including Qatar and the U.A.E. However, the direction of travel for the region as a whole is fairly clear.

A member of Free Syrian Army opens fire against PYD/PKK forces during Operation Olive Branch in Jinderes district of Afrin, Syria on February 12, 2018. (Photo: Mahmut Faysal/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

In all, eight countries cut their spending in 2017 compared to 2016, including countries with sizeable military budgets such as Algeria, which spent $10bn in 2017, 2% less than the year before, Israel ($18.5bn, down 7%) and Oman ($8.7bn, down 5%). The most significant drop in monetary terms was in Saudi Arabia which slashed $4.8bn from its budget. However, that still meant it spent $76.7bn on its armed forces last year, which was far higher than any other country in the region and indeed the third largest military budget in the world after the US and China.

The largest fall in percentage terms was in Egypt, which reduced its military spending by almost half, from $5.3bn in 2016 to $2.7bn last year. However, this is explained by the devaluation of the Egyptian pound over the period. In local currency terms, Cairo’s military budget actually rose from E£43.2bn to E£47.1bn.

In broad terms, the cuts to defence budgets are a clear sign of the fiscal pressures that governments in the region are under. Despite the instability in many corners of the region, lower oil prices and slow economic growth mean that the days of free spending are in the past and governments are being forced to trim their ambitions.

While most countries scaled back their spending last year, there were a few notable exceptions. Iran’s budget increased slightly in dollar terms by 1% but more in local currency terms, with a 9% lift to IR544 trillion ($16bn) in 2017. Others to increase their spending included Iraq, where Islamic State forces have now been largely defeated but where the security situation continues to be fragile, and Jordan and Lebanon, which are both dealing with the fallout from the civil war in neighbouring Syria.

0

Middle East Governments Are Cutting Their Military Budgets Even As Wars Rage Around The Region

Military spending in the Middle East has fallen over the past year, despite a string of ongoing conflicts across the region, including those in Iraq, Libya, Syria and Yemen.

According to data published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) on February 14, total spending across the region fell to $167bn in 2017, down 4% from $174bn the year before. Measured by a number of other metrics, the fall was even faster. Defence spending on a per capita basis was down 5% to $388 while spending as a percentage of the region’s GDP dropped from 5.73% of GDP in 2016 to 5.4% last year.

These figures don’t capture all the countries in the region – in its Military Balance 2018 report, IISS says it has no reliable information for the defence budgets of a number of likely high-spending countries including Qatar and the U.A.E. However, the direction of travel for the region as a whole is fairly clear.

A member of Free Syrian Army opens fire against PYD/PKK forces during Operation Olive Branch in Jinderes district of Afrin, Syria on February 12, 2018. (Photo: Mahmut Faysal/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

In all, eight countries cut their spending in 2017 compared to 2016, including countries with sizeable military budgets such as Algeria, which spent $10bn in 2017, 2% less than the year before, Israel ($18.5bn, down 7%) and Oman ($8.7bn, down 5%). The most significant drop in monetary terms was in Saudi Arabia which slashed $4.8bn from its budget. However, that still meant it spent $76.7bn on its armed forces last year, which was far higher than any other country in the region and indeed the third largest military budget in the world after the US and China.

The largest fall in percentage terms was in Egypt, which reduced its military spending by almost half, from $5.3bn in 2016 to $2.7bn last year. However, this is explained by the devaluation of the Egyptian pound over the period. In local currency terms, Cairo’s military budget actually rose from E£43.2bn to E£47.1bn.

In broad terms, the cuts to defence budgets are a clear sign of the fiscal pressures that governments in the region are under. Despite the instability in many corners of the region, lower oil prices and slow economic growth mean that the days of free spending are in the past and governments are being forced to trim their ambitions.

While most countries scaled back their spending last year, there were a few notable exceptions. Iran’s budget increased slightly in dollar terms by 1% but more in local currency terms, with a 9% lift to IR544 trillion ($16bn) in 2017. Others to increase their spending included Iraq, where Islamic State forces have now been largely defeated but where the security situation continues to be fragile, and Jordan and Lebanon, which are both dealing with the fallout from the civil war in neighbouring Syria.

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Terrorists find new ways to recruit online, DHS chief says

The Department of Homeland Security logo is seen on a law enforcement vehicle in Washington DC. US Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Tuesday that terrorists will turn to blogs, chat rooms and encrypted chat apps to keep spreading their message online.

US Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Tuesday that terrorists will turn to blogs, chat rooms and encrypted chat apps to keep spreading their message online.


Getty Images

As major tech companies get better at ridding their platforms of gory videos and calls to commit violence, terrorists are finding new ways to post their messages, Kirstjen Nielsen, secretary of the US Department of Homeland Security, said Tuesday.

“They’ve continued to demonstrate their will,” Nielsen said, noting that blogs, chat rooms and encrypted chat apps can serve as ways for terrorist groups to radicalize and recruit new members.

Nielsen spoke at an the 2018 Digital Forum on Terrorism Prevention in Silicon Valley focused on counterterrorism efforts on the internet. The event took place at Palantir, a data analysis firm that contracts with government agencies in counterterrorism operations. 

Nielsen’s remarks hinted at the tangle of challenges faced by the tech world and the government alike when it comes to terrorists on the internet. Tech companies have had to learn how to keep ISIS, for example, from running Twitter accounts[1], or from sharing graphic videos involving beheadings or other forms of executions on YouTube[2]. Meanwhile, DHS says it has developed a strategy of supporting people within communities where recruitment is taking place who want to spread a counterterrorism message, rather than trying to put out its own “terrorism doesn’t pay” style communications.

In fighting ISIS, that involves supporting “Imams and moms,” Nielsen said. In dealing with the threat from white supremacists, she added, the agency looks to people who’ve left organizations driving that movement to help fight recruitment and calls to violence.

While thanking the tech companies partnering with DHS on the effort to remove and respond to online terrorist recruitment, Nielsen said she wants to be realistic. After all, the internet is vast.

“Users around the world post four hours of content every minute,” Nielsen noted.

Nielsen highlighted the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, an effort led by Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Twitter that was announced in June[3], as a key factor in removing terrorist recruitment content from their sites. In December, the companies announced[4] they were sharing information with each other to identify users posting terrorist content.

Joining Nielsen was UK Home Secretary Amber Rudd, who said technology like machine learning will be instrumental in finding and removing online recruitment content. The UK is partnering with machine learning company ASI Data Science[5] for just this purpose.

This technology “ultimately can prevent content being made available to internet users in the first place,” Rudd said.

Security[6]:  Stay up-to-date on the latest in breaches, hacks, fixes and all those cybersecurity issues that keep you up at night.

iHate[7]: CNET looks at how intolerance is taking over the internet.

References

  1. ^ running Twitter accounts (www.cnet.com)
  2. ^ on YouTube (www.cnet.com)
  3. ^ announced in June (newsroom.fb.com)
  4. ^ the companies announced (www.cnet.com)
  5. ^ The UK is partnering with machine learning company ASI Data Science (www.cnet.com)
  6. ^ Security (www.cnet.com)
  7. ^ iHate (www.cnet.com)
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Homeland Security chief: Terrorists remain active online

The Department of Homeland Security logo is seen on a law enforcement vehicle in Washington DC. US Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Tuesday that terrorists will turn to blogs, chat rooms and encrypted chat apps to keep spreading their message online.

US Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Tuesday that terrorists will turn to blogs, chat rooms and encrypted chat apps to keep spreading their message online.


Getty Images

As major tech companies get better at ridding their platforms of gory videos and calls to commit violence, terrorists are finding new ways to post their messages, Kirstjen Nielsen, secretary of the US Department of Homeland Security, said Tuesday.

“They’ve continued to demonstrate their will,” Nielsen said, noting that blogs, chat rooms and encrypted chat apps can serve as ways for terrorist groups to radicalize and recruit new members.

Nielsen spoke at an the 2018 Digital Forum on Terrorism Prevention in Silicon Valley focused on counterterrorism efforts on the internet. The event took place at Palantir, a data analysis firm that contracts with government agencies in counterterrorism operations. 

Nielsen’s remarks hinted at the tangle of challenges faced by the tech world and the government alike when it comes to terrorists on the internet. Tech companies have had to learn how to keep ISIS, for example, from running Twitter accounts[1], or from sharing graphic videos involving beheadings or other forms of executions on YouTube[2]. Meanwhile, DHS says it has developed a strategy of supporting people within communities where recruitment is taking place who want to spread a counterterrorism message, rather than trying to put out its own “terrorism doesn’t pay” style communications.

In fighting ISIS, that involves supporting “Imams and moms,” Nielsen said. In dealing with the threat from white supremacists, she added, the agency looks to people who’ve left organizations driving that movement to help fight recruitment and calls to violence.

While thanking the tech companies partnering with DHS on the effort to remove and respond to online terrorist recruitment, Nielsen said she wants to be realistic. After all, the internet is vast.

“Users around the world post four hours of content every minute,” Nielsen noted.

Nielsen highlighted the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, an effort led by Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Twitter that was announced in June[3], as a key factor in removing terrorist recruitment content from their sites. In December, the companies announced[4] they were sharing information with each other to identify users posting terrorist content.

Joining Nielsen was UK Home Secretary Amber Rudd, who said technology like machine learning will be instrumental in finding and removing online recruitment content. The UK is partnering with machine learning company ASI Data Science[5] for just this purpose.

This technology “ultimately can prevent content being made available to internet users in the first place,” Rudd said.

Security[6]:  Stay up-to-date on the latest in breaches, hacks, fixes and all those cybersecurity issues that keep you up at night.

iHate[7]: CNET looks at how intolerance is taking over the internet.

References

  1. ^ running Twitter accounts (www.cnet.com)
  2. ^ on YouTube (www.cnet.com)
  3. ^ announced in June (newsroom.fb.com)
  4. ^ the companies announced (www.cnet.com)
  5. ^ The UK is partnering with machine learning company ASI Data Science (www.cnet.com)
  6. ^ Security (www.cnet.com)
  7. ^ iHate (www.cnet.com)