Tagged: work

0

Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program

The CSIS Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program shapes the policies needed to enhance U.S. and global security in the 21st Century.

The United States continues to face the evolving threat of international and domestic terrorism, as well as an emerging set of challenges in securing borders, developing national and community resilience against natural disasters, and ensuring the continued security of critical infrastructure. The Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program analyzes how the United States and other countries work toward these goals, especially in an age of limited budgets and difficult decisions. It considers the measures that nations can take—such as creating a national infrastructure that is resistant to physical damage, enhancing resilience, or increasing cross-agency cooperation—to enhance their domestic security.

Past initiatives include studies on disaster preparedness, response, recovery, and resilience; the evolving dynamics of South Asian militancy; international homeland security cooperation; “homegrown” extremism in the United States; the future of al Qaeda and its affiliates; and information sharing in law enforcement and counterterrorism.

The project aims to serve as a leading voice in the national and global conversation on homeland security and counterterrorism issues. 

  Publications by subject

Most Recent

Congressional Testimony

March 15, 2018

Report

February 14, 2018

Podcast Episode

August 21, 2017

On Demand Event

May 25, 2017

In the News

FCW[1] | Sean D. Carberry

March 6, 2017

On Demand Event

June 29, 2016

Commentary

March 4, 2016

Report

February 4, 2016

Featured Projects

References

  1. ^ FCW (fcw.com)
0

Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program

The CSIS Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program shapes the policies needed to enhance U.S. and global security in the 21st Century.

The United States continues to face the evolving threat of international and domestic terrorism, as well as an emerging set of challenges in securing borders, developing national and community resilience against natural disasters, and ensuring the continued security of critical infrastructure. The Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program analyzes how the United States and other countries work toward these goals, especially in an age of limited budgets and difficult decisions. It considers the measures that nations can take—such as creating a national infrastructure that is resistant to physical damage, enhancing resilience, or increasing cross-agency cooperation—to enhance their domestic security.

Past initiatives include studies on disaster preparedness, response, recovery, and resilience; the evolving dynamics of South Asian militancy; international homeland security cooperation; “homegrown” extremism in the United States; the future of al Qaeda and its affiliates; and information sharing in law enforcement and counterterrorism.

The project aims to serve as a leading voice in the national and global conversation on homeland security and counterterrorism issues. 

  Publications by subject

Most Recent

Congressional Testimony

March 15, 2018

Report

February 14, 2018

Podcast Episode

August 21, 2017

On Demand Event

May 25, 2017

In the News

FCW[1] | Sean D. Carberry

March 6, 2017

On Demand Event

June 29, 2016

Commentary

March 4, 2016

Report

February 4, 2016

Featured Projects

References

  1. ^ FCW (fcw.com)
0

Milley: Army is pushing to get two-thirds of its brigades ready to deploy at any minute

The Army is working to pull itself out of a readiness crisis after almost two decades of continuous combat, coupled with waves of build-ups and drawdowns[1].

“That is not to say we’re where we need to be,” Milley said.

Gen. Mark Milley, Army chief of staff, listens to questions from the press at Walter E. Washington Conference Center in Washington in October. On Thursday, he told lawmakers the Army should achieve readiness goals in about three to four years. (Spc. Bree-Ann Ramos-Clifton/Army)

Gen. Mark Milley, Army chief of staff, listens to questions from the press at Walter E. Washington Conference Center in Washington in October. On Thursday, he told lawmakers the Army should achieve readiness goals in about three to four years. (Spc. Bree-Ann Ramos-Clifton/Army)

Gen. Mark Milley, Army chief of staff, listens to questions from the press at Walter E. Washington Conference Center in Washington in October. On Thursday, he told lawmakers the Army should achieve readiness goals in about three to four years. (Spc. Bree-Ann Ramos-Clifton/Army)

The goal is to get 66 percent of the active Army’s BCTs to the highest level of readiness, he said, and the Reserve and National Guard’s teams to 33 percent, in the next three years. He didn’t say how many BCTs have achieved that level, but indicated in response to a congressman that it is more than five.

“Units aren’t built just overnight, and their readiness isn’t built overnight, as you know,” he said.

Part of that push will include bringing back headquarters elements from train-advise-assist missions in the Middle East and replacing them with Security Force Assistance Brigades, so that BCTs can work on boosting lost combat readiness.

“If the international environment stays the way it is this minute, we think with the glide path we’re on, we’ll achieve our readiness objectives – complete – somewhere around the 2021-22 time frame,” Milley said.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

Aviation in “pretty good shape”

Multiple members of the committee asked Milley and Army Secretary Mark Esper about Army aviation, and particularly, the Army’s budget request for next year.

Rep. Martha Roby, R-Alabama, whose district includes the Army’s aviation headquarters at Fort Rucker, pointed to a billion-dollar difference between the Army’s fiscal year 2017 aviation budget and its request for fiscal year 2019.

In fact, Esper said, the Army had asked for $3.6 billion in 2017 but received $4.7 from Congress, so this year’s $3.6 billion request is a natural progression.

“So it’s not a planned decrease by the service,” he said. “We find at this point that because of the investments we made in previous years, the bump up in ‘17, that Army aviation cross the board is in pretty good shape.”

Milley echoed that sentiment on the topic of manning, as the Army in recent years has faced a shortage of aviators.

“What I’ve seen is not so much a retention issue as a production issue,” Milley said. “We are short pilots, but we’re at 94 percent on warrant officer pilots for rotary wing aircraft. We’re actually not in that bad of shape.”

That is still several hundred pilots, he added.

To fix that, the service has looked to not only retention bonuses, but to increased funding at flight school to get more students through training.

“We’re filling all of the scheduled seats and we’re monitoring that very, very closely,” Milley said.

References

  1. ^ build-ups and drawdowns (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ The Army is bringing back pilot retention bonuses (www.armytimes.com)
0

Milley: Army is pushing to get two-thirds of its brigades ready to deploy at any minute

The Army is working to pull itself out of a readiness crisis after almost two decades of continuous combat, coupled with waves of build-ups and drawdowns[1].

“That is not to say we’re where we need to be,” Milley said.

Gen. Mark Milley, Army chief of staff, listens to questions from the press at Walter E. Washington Conference Center in Washington in October. On Thursday, he told lawmakers the Army should achieve readiness goals in about three to four years. (Spc. Bree-Ann Ramos-Clifton/Army)

Gen. Mark Milley, Army chief of staff, listens to questions from the press at Walter E. Washington Conference Center in Washington in October. On Thursday, he told lawmakers the Army should achieve readiness goals in about three to four years. (Spc. Bree-Ann Ramos-Clifton/Army)

Gen. Mark Milley, Army chief of staff, listens to questions from the press at Walter E. Washington Conference Center in Washington in October. On Thursday, he told lawmakers the Army should achieve readiness goals in about three to four years. (Spc. Bree-Ann Ramos-Clifton/Army)

The goal is to get 66 percent of the active Army’s BCTs to the highest level of readiness, he said, and the Reserve and National Guard’s teams to 33 percent, in the next three years. He didn’t say how many BCTs have achieved that level, but indicated in response to a congressman that it is more than five.

“Units aren’t built just overnight, and their readiness isn’t built overnight, as you know,” he said.

Part of that push will include bringing back headquarters elements from train-advise-assist missions in the Middle East and replacing them with Security Force Assistance Brigades, so that BCTs can work on boosting lost combat readiness.

“If the international environment stays the way it is this minute, we think with the glide path we’re on, we’ll achieve our readiness objectives – complete – somewhere around the 2021-22 time frame,” Milley said.

Aviation in “pretty good shape”

Multiple members of the committee asked Milley and Army Secretary Mark Esper about Army aviation, and particularly, the Army’s budget request for next year.

Rep. Martha Roby, R-Alabama, whose district includes the Army’s aviation headquarters at Fort Rucker, pointed to a billion-dollar difference between the Army’s fiscal year 2017 aviation budget and its request for fiscal year 2019.

In fact, Esper said, the Army had asked for $3.6 billion in 2017 but received $4.7 from Congress, so this year’s $3.6 billion request is a natural progression.

“So it’s not a planned decrease by the service,” he said. “We find at this point that because of the investments we made in previous years, the bump up in ‘17, that Army aviation cross the board is in pretty good shape.”

Milley echoed that sentiment on the topic of manning, as the Army in recent years has faced a shortage of aviators.

“What I’ve seen is not so much a retention issue as a production issue,” Milley said. “We are short pilots, but we’re at 94 percent on warrant officer pilots for rotary wing aircraft. We’re actually not in that bad of shape.”

That is still several hundred pilots, he added.

To fix that, the service has looked to not only retention bonuses, but to increased funding at flight school to get more students through training.

“We’re filling all of the scheduled seats and we’re monitoring that very, very closely,” Milley said.

References

  1. ^ build-ups and drawdowns (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ The Army is bringing back pilot retention bonuses (www.armytimes.com)
0

Tyler police team up with local shelter to try to combat homelessness

TYLER, TX (KLTV) –

Police all over the country are facing a tough new challenge with the homeless population; enforcing laws but still being sensitive to quality of life.

“Just bad choice after bad choice, addictions, drugs, alcohol,” Emiley Plunkett says.

Emiley Plunkett had been on the streets for eight years when Tyler police officer Johnny Green found her in a homeless camp. She’s now registered as a Texas citizen, and on track to marrying her husband-to-be.

The Tyler Police Department has partnered with the Hiway 80 Rescue Mission, a nonprofit that provides food, clothing, computer access and for most, housing.

“I care for most of these people and I just want to see the best for them, I want to push them in that right direction to get them off the streets,” Officer Green says.

The department just recently donated 1,500 pounds of non-perishable food.

Police officers are assigned to specific areas in the city, where they go to homeless camps and interact with people staying there. If the camp violates property laws, the officers find them a shelter to stay in, instead of arresting them on the spot.

“That’s been really nice for those who are homeless who would maybe sometimes be afraid of the police, to see them as a resource and as a friend,” Hiway 80 Rescue Mission Director Dawn Moltzan says.

The mission’s work is supported entirely through donations, and they say any help of volunteer work is appreciated[1].

Copyright 2018 KLTV. All rights reserved.[2]

0

Tyler police team up with local shelter to try to combat homelessness

TYLER, TX (KLTV) –

Police all over the country are facing a tough new challenge with the homeless population; enforcing laws but still being sensitive to quality of life.

“Just bad choice after bad choice, addictions, drugs, alcohol,” Emiley Plunkett says.

Emiley Plunkett had been on the streets for eight years when Tyler police officer Johnny Green found her in a homeless camp. She’s now registered as a Texas citizen, and on track to marrying her husband-to-be.

The Tyler Police Department has partnered with the Hiway 80 Rescue Mission, a nonprofit that provides food, clothing, computer access and for most, housing.

“I care for most of these people and I just want to see the best for them, I want to push them in that right direction to get them off the streets,” Officer Green says.

The department just recently donated 1,500 pounds of non-perishable food.

Police officers are assigned to specific areas in the city, where they go to homeless camps and interact with people staying there. If the camp violates property laws, the officers find them a shelter to stay in, instead of arresting them on the spot.

“That’s been really nice for those who are homeless who would maybe sometimes be afraid of the police, to see them as a resource and as a friend,” Hiway 80 Rescue Mission Director Dawn Moltzan says.

The mission’s work is supported entirely through donations, and they say any help of volunteer work is appreciated[1].

Copyright 2018 KLTV. All rights reserved.[2]

0

Army identifies 82nd Airborne paratrooper who died in off-post home

Spc. Brock Rollins, an infantryman with 1st Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division[1], died in an off-post residence in Fayetteville, North Carolina.

Fayetteville police are awaiting the results of an autopsy to determine how Rollins died, a police spokesman told The Fayetteville Observer. The death does not appear to be suspicious, he said, according to the newspaper.
[2]

Rollins joined the Army in 2010 and had been with the 82nd Airborne since March 2011, according to the division. He deployed twice to Afghanistan.

“Specialist Brock Rollins volunteered to serve in our Army in a time of war and for that we are grateful,” Col. Pat Work, commander of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, said in a news release.

Rollins’ awards and decorations include the Army Commendation Medal with one Oak Leaf Cluster, the Army Achievement Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Parachutist Badge.

References

  1. ^ 82nd Airborne Division (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ The Fayetteville Observer (www.fayobserver.com)
0

Darien Center solider honored during Ukrainian deployment

ARTICLE OPTIONS

YAVORIV, UKRAINE — A local New York National Guard soldier currently deployed in a mission assisting Ukrainian Army units in achieving NATO interoperability will head home with the thanks of the NYNG’s commander.

Sgt. Foster Quakenbush of Darien Center was photographed receiving a challenge coin from Maj. Gen. Anthony German during the Adjutant General’s visit last week to the 220 members of the 27th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, currently stationed at the Yavoriv Combat Training Center.

According to the New York National Guard, German presented the challenge coins to “outstanding soldiers in recognition of their hard work.”

Quakenbusch, a 2014 Alexander High School graduate, was recently promoted from specialist, and is slated to return home late this summer after the Syracuse-based 27th completes a year-long deployment as part of Joint Multinational Training Group — Ukraine.

Since arriving in November, the soldiers assigned to the JMTG-U have been mentoring Ukrainian Army units. They are the most easterly deployed U.S. Army units, the NYNG reports.

German toured the training center and met with New York soldiers as well military leaders from allied and partner nations whose troops also serve at the center. He was accompanied on his visit by Maj. Gen. Steven Ferrari, the 42nd Infantry Division commander, Col. Christopher Cronin, the 27th Brigade commander; Command Chief Master Sgt. Amy Giaquinto, the New York National Guard’s senior enlisted service member, and Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony McLean, the 27th Brigade’s senior enlisted leader.

In addition to recognizing soldiers for their hard work, the leadership team conducted a re-enlistment ceremony for Staff Sgt. Gaspar Teri, a combat medic; and the promotion ceremony for Sgt. 1st. Class Steven M. Swanson of Stow, N.Y.

The generals were also able to observe Ukrainian Army units training in the field and tour the newly constructed simulation center.

Finished last fall, the simulation center allows Soldiers to conduct computer-based tactical training from the individual Soldier level up to and including the brigade-staff level. Currently a stand alone facility, there are plans to link it with similar centers across Europe to expand the scale and scope of the training conducted.

0

Darien Center solider honored during Ukrainian deployment

ARTICLE OPTIONS

YAVORIV, UKRAINE — A local New York National Guard soldier currently deployed in a mission assisting Ukrainian Army units in achieving NATO interoperability will head home with the thanks of the NYNG’s commander.

Sgt. Foster Quakenbush of Darien Center was photographed receiving a challenge coin from Maj. Gen. Anthony German during the Adjutant General’s visit last week to the 220 members of the 27th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, currently stationed at the Yavoriv Combat Training Center.

According to the New York National Guard, German presented the challenge coins to “outstanding soldiers in recognition of their hard work.”

Quakenbusch, a 2014 Alexander High School graduate, was recently promoted from specialist, and is slated to return home late this summer after the Syracuse-based 27th completes a year-long deployment as part of Joint Multinational Training Group — Ukraine.

Since arriving in November, the soldiers assigned to the JMTG-U have been mentoring Ukrainian Army units. They are the most easterly deployed U.S. Army units, the NYNG reports.

German toured the training center and met with New York soldiers as well military leaders from allied and partner nations whose troops also serve at the center. He was accompanied on his visit by Maj. Gen. Steven Ferrari, the 42nd Infantry Division commander, Col. Christopher Cronin, the 27th Brigade commander; Command Chief Master Sgt. Amy Giaquinto, the New York National Guard’s senior enlisted service member, and Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony McLean, the 27th Brigade’s senior enlisted leader.

In addition to recognizing soldiers for their hard work, the leadership team conducted a re-enlistment ceremony for Staff Sgt. Gaspar Teri, a combat medic; and the promotion ceremony for Sgt. 1st. Class Steven M. Swanson of Stow, N.Y.

The generals were also able to observe Ukrainian Army units training in the field and tour the newly constructed simulation center.

Finished last fall, the simulation center allows Soldiers to conduct computer-based tactical training from the individual Soldier level up to and including the brigade-staff level. Currently a stand alone facility, there are plans to link it with similar centers across Europe to expand the scale and scope of the training conducted.

0

Darien Center solider honored during Ukrainian deployment

ARTICLE OPTIONS

YAVORIV, UKRAINE — A local New York National Guard soldier currently deployed in a mission assisting Ukrainian Army units in achieving NATO interoperability will head home with the thanks of the NYNG’s commander.

Sgt. Foster Quakenbush of Darien Center was photographed receiving a challenge coin from Maj. Gen. Anthony German during the Adjutant General’s visit last week to the 220 members of the 27th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, currently stationed at the Yavoriv Combat Training Center.

According to the New York National Guard, German presented the challenge coins to “outstanding soldiers in recognition of their hard work.”

Quakenbusch, a 2014 Alexander High School graduate, was recently promoted from specialist, and is slated to return home late this summer after the Syracuse-based 27th completes a year-long deployment as part of Joint Multinational Training Group — Ukraine.

Since arriving in November, the soldiers assigned to the JMTG-U have been mentoring Ukrainian Army units. They are the most easterly deployed U.S. Army units, the NYNG reports.

German toured the training center and met with New York soldiers as well military leaders from allied and partner nations whose troops also serve at the center. He was accompanied on his visit by Maj. Gen. Steven Ferrari, the 42nd Infantry Division commander, Col. Christopher Cronin, the 27th Brigade commander; Command Chief Master Sgt. Amy Giaquinto, the New York National Guard’s senior enlisted service member, and Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony McLean, the 27th Brigade’s senior enlisted leader.

In addition to recognizing soldiers for their hard work, the leadership team conducted a re-enlistment ceremony for Staff Sgt. Gaspar Teri, a combat medic; and the promotion ceremony for Sgt. 1st. Class Steven M. Swanson of Stow, N.Y.

The generals were also able to observe Ukrainian Army units training in the field and tour the newly constructed simulation center.

Finished last fall, the simulation center allows Soldiers to conduct computer-based tactical training from the individual Soldier level up to and including the brigade-staff level. Currently a stand alone facility, there are plans to link it with similar centers across Europe to expand the scale and scope of the training conducted.