Tagged: united

0

For US and China, Lasers and Missiles Heighten Military Tensions

“Anyone with no invasive intention will find no reason to worry about this,” she added.

While China has long claimed the islands, reefs and other outcroppings within the South China Sea, other nations also have claims there, including Vietnam and the Philippines.

China’s vast reclamation project[1], which began in earnest in 2013, shortly after Mr. Xi became the country’s paramount leader, has steadily turned once-uninhabited places into fortified islands with airfields and increasingly military outposts. In doing so it has brushed aside warnings from the United States and other nations and even a ruling against its territorial claims[2] by an international arbitration panel in 2016.

China’s base in Djibouti, its first overseas, has long been a source of concern[3] for the United States and other militaries operating around the Horn of Africa. It opened last year and has been portrayed by the Chinese as a logistics base to support antipiracy, counterterrorism and humanitarian operations in Africa and the Middle East.

It also happens to be just a few miles from the only permanent American base in Africa, which was established after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The base, operated by the Navy adjacent to Djibouti’s international airport, is home to some 4,000 personnel, including those involved in highly secretive missions in the region, including at least two Navy SEAL raids[4] into Yemen.

The use of lasers was first made public in April in a warning to pilots[5] issued by the Federal Aviation Administration. It noted that there had been multiple instances of “a high-power laser” being used near where the Chinese base is. Using lasers to disorient or disable pilots is an old military tactic, but an international protocol[6] adopted in 1995 and joined by China prohibits the practice.

Ms. White said that there was no doubt about the origin of the lasers, and that the Pentagon had asked the Chinese to investigate. “It’s a serious matter,” she said, “and so we’re taking it very seriously.”

In a statement on Friday afternoon, China’s Ministry of National Defense strongly disputed the Pentagon’s accusations, saying they were “completely inconsistent with fact.”

References

  1. ^ vast reclamation project (www.nytimes.com)
  2. ^ a ruling against its territorial claims (www.nytimes.com)
  3. ^ a source of concern (www.nytimes.com)
  4. ^ Navy SEAL raids (www.nytimes.com)
  5. ^ a warning to pilots (pilotweb.nas.faa.gov)
  6. ^ international protocol (www.icrc.org)
0

Lasers and Missiles Heighten US-China Military Tensions

“Anyone with no invasive intention will find no reason to worry about this,” she added.

While China has long claimed the islands, reefs and other outcroppings within the South China Sea, other nations also have claims there, including Vietnam and the Philippines.

China’s vast reclamation project[1], which began in earnest in 2013, shortly after Mr. Xi became the country’s paramount leader, has steadily turned once-uninhabited places into fortified islands with airfields and increasingly military outposts. In doing so it has brushed aside warnings from the United States and other nations and even a ruling against its territorial claims[2] by an international arbitration panel in 2016.

China’s base in Djibouti, its first overseas, has long been a source of concern[3] for the United States and other militaries operating around the Horn of Africa. It opened last year and has been portrayed by the Chinese as a logistics base to support antipiracy, counterterrorism and humanitarian operations in Africa and the Middle East.

It also happens to be just a few miles from the only permanent American base in Africa, which was established after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The base, operated by the Navy adjacent to Djibouti’s international airport, is home to some 4,000 personnel, including those involved in highly secretive missions in the region, including at least two Navy SEAL raids[4] into Yemen.

The use of lasers was first made public in April in a warning to pilots[5] issued by the Federal Aviation Administration. It noted that there had been multiple instances of “a high-power laser” being used near where the Chinese base is. Using lasers to disorient or disable pilots is an old military tactic, but an international protocol[6] adopted in 1995 and joined by China prohibits the practice.

Ms. White said that there was no doubt about the origin of the lasers, and that the Pentagon had asked the Chinese to investigate. “It’s a serious matter,” she said, “and so we’re taking it very seriously.”

In a statement on Friday afternoon, China’s Ministry of National Defense strongly disputed the Pentagon’s accusations, saying they were “completely inconsistent with fact.”

References

  1. ^ vast reclamation project (www.nytimes.com)
  2. ^ a ruling against its territorial claims (www.nytimes.com)
  3. ^ a source of concern (www.nytimes.com)
  4. ^ Navy SEAL raids (www.nytimes.com)
  5. ^ a warning to pilots (pilotweb.nas.faa.gov)
  6. ^ international protocol (www.icrc.org)
0

For US and China, Lasers and Missiles Heighten Military Tensions

“Anyone with no invasive intention will find no reason to worry about this,” she added.

While China has long claimed the islands, reefs and other outcroppings within the South China Sea, other nations also have claims there, including Vietnam and the Philippines.

China’s vast reclamation project[1], which began in earnest in 2013, shortly after Mr. Xi became the country’s paramount leader, has steadily turned once-uninhabited places into fortified islands with airfields and increasingly military outposts. In doing so it has brushed aside warnings from the United States and other nations and even a ruling against its territorial claims[2] by an international arbitration panel in 2016.

China’s base in Djibouti, its first overseas, has long been a source of concern[3] for the United States and other militaries operating around the Horn of Africa. It opened last year and has been portrayed by the Chinese as a logistics base to support antipiracy, counterterrorism and humanitarian operations in Africa and the Middle East.

It also happens to be just a few miles from the only permanent American base in Africa, which was established after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The base, operated by the Navy adjacent to Djibouti’s international airport, is home to some 4,000 personnel, including those involved in highly secretive missions in the region, including at least two Navy SEAL raids[4] into Yemen.

The use of lasers was first made public in April in a warning to pilots[5] issued by the Federal Aviation Administration. It noted that there had been multiple instances of “a high-power laser” being used near where the Chinese base is. Using lasers to disorient or disable pilots is an old military tactic, but an international protocol[6] adopted in 1995 and joined by China prohibits the practice.

Ms. White said that there was no doubt about the origin of the lasers, and that the Pentagon had asked the Chinese to investigate. “It’s a serious matter,” she said, “and so we’re taking it very seriously.”

In a statement on Friday afternoon, China’s Ministry of National Defense strongly disputed the Pentagon’s accusations, saying they were “completely inconsistent with fact.”

References

  1. ^ vast reclamation project (www.nytimes.com)
  2. ^ a ruling against its territorial claims (www.nytimes.com)
  3. ^ a source of concern (www.nytimes.com)
  4. ^ Navy SEAL raids (www.nytimes.com)
  5. ^ a warning to pilots (pilotweb.nas.faa.gov)
  6. ^ international protocol (www.icrc.org)
0

Reports of Sexual Assault in the Military Rise by 10 Percent, Pentagon Finds

WASHINGTON — More than 6,700 Defense Department employees reported being sexually assaulted in the 2017 fiscal year — the highest number since the United States military began tracking reports more than a decade ago, according to Pentagon data released on Monday.

The new data showed a 10 percent increase of military sexual assault reports from the previous fiscal year. The uptick occurred amid a Marine Corps scandal over sharing nude photos and heightened public discourse about sexual harassment in American culture.

Pentagon officials sought to portray the increase as reflective of more troops and military civilians trusting commanders and the military’s judicial system enough to come forward.

In all, 6,769 people reported assaults for the 2017 fiscal year, which ended Sept. 30. It was the largest yearly increase since 2014 and the most reports since the Pentagon started tracking the data in 2006.

Roughly two-thirds of the reports resulted in disciplinary action, the data show. The remaining 38 percent were discounted because evidence was lacking, victims declined to participate in hearings or other reasons.

The Army, Navy and Air Force each saw a roughly 10 percent uptick in sexual assault reports. The increase nearly reached 15 percent in the Marine Corps.

Separately, roughly 700 complaints of sexual harassment were reported across the military in the 2017 fiscal year, according to the Pentagon data. Ninety percent of the reports were from enlisted troops.

In March 2017, a social media group made up of active duty and former Marines was accused of sharing explicit photos of female colleagues, prompting a widespread investigation by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. A number of Marines were punished, and the service started a campaign to educate its troops on sexual harassment and assault.

Despite efforts to rid the internet of military-themed groups such as the one found last year, others have continued to pop up.

Gen. Robert B. Neller, the Marine Corps commandant, said the service was in a “better place” after the scandal.

Lawmakers have long hammered the military on its predominantly male culture and have sometimes lobbied for military courts to be civilian run so due process is absent of command influence.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, who last week called sexual assault a “cancer” in the military, has demanded that leaders throughout the ranks make sure the problem does not spread.

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Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program

The CSIS Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program shapes the policies needed to enhance U.S. and global security in the 21st Century.

The United States continues to face the evolving threat of international and domestic terrorism, as well as an emerging set of challenges in securing borders, developing national and community resilience against natural disasters, and ensuring the continued security of critical infrastructure. The Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program analyzes how the United States and other countries work toward these goals, especially in an age of limited budgets and difficult decisions. It considers the measures that nations can take—such as creating a national infrastructure that is resistant to physical damage, enhancing resilience, or increasing cross-agency cooperation—to enhance their domestic security.

Past initiatives include studies on disaster preparedness, response, recovery, and resilience; the evolving dynamics of South Asian militancy; international homeland security cooperation; “homegrown” extremism in the United States; the future of al Qaeda and its affiliates; and information sharing in law enforcement and counterterrorism.

The project aims to serve as a leading voice in the national and global conversation on homeland security and counterterrorism issues. 

  Publications by subject

Most Recent

Congressional Testimony

March 15, 2018

Report

February 14, 2018

Podcast Episode

August 21, 2017

On Demand Event

May 25, 2017

In the News

FCW[1] | Sean D. Carberry

March 6, 2017

On Demand Event

June 29, 2016

Commentary

March 4, 2016

Report

February 4, 2016

Featured Projects

References

  1. ^ FCW (fcw.com)
0

Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program

The CSIS Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program shapes the policies needed to enhance U.S. and global security in the 21st Century.

The United States continues to face the evolving threat of international and domestic terrorism, as well as an emerging set of challenges in securing borders, developing national and community resilience against natural disasters, and ensuring the continued security of critical infrastructure. The Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program analyzes how the United States and other countries work toward these goals, especially in an age of limited budgets and difficult decisions. It considers the measures that nations can take—such as creating a national infrastructure that is resistant to physical damage, enhancing resilience, or increasing cross-agency cooperation—to enhance their domestic security.

Past initiatives include studies on disaster preparedness, response, recovery, and resilience; the evolving dynamics of South Asian militancy; international homeland security cooperation; “homegrown” extremism in the United States; the future of al Qaeda and its affiliates; and information sharing in law enforcement and counterterrorism.

The project aims to serve as a leading voice in the national and global conversation on homeland security and counterterrorism issues. 

  Publications by subject

Most Recent

Congressional Testimony

March 15, 2018

Report

February 14, 2018

Podcast Episode

August 21, 2017

On Demand Event

May 25, 2017

In the News

FCW[1] | Sean D. Carberry

March 6, 2017

On Demand Event

June 29, 2016

Commentary

March 4, 2016

Report

February 4, 2016

Featured Projects

References

  1. ^ FCW (fcw.com)
0

Some soldiers may not be able to handle new pace of training, Guard chief says

The head of the National Guard Bureau says he believes the increased training days with the Army National Guard 4.0[1] initiative are sustainable but predicts some soldiers might need to make changes.

Gen. Joseph Lengyel, speaking Monday at an Association of the United States Army forum, said the 4.0 initiative focuses on certain units that need to deploy faster[2].

These high-priority units[3] include heavy armored brigade combat teams and Stryker brigade combat teams.

“We are changing the operational deployment tempo and the training tempo of the Army National Guard,” Lengyel said.

Beginning this year, four brigades — instead of two — will train at combat training centers each year, according to bureau spokesman Lt. Col. Wes Parmer. By fiscal 2019, seven brigades will participate in war-fighter staff exercises and exportable CTC rotations every year.

For example, the Tennessee National Guard’s 278th Armored Brigade Combat Team will complete a rotation at Fort Irwin’s National Training Center this spring. The soldiers will deploy overseas later this summer in support of NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence mission, Parmer told Army Times via email.

Although many Guardsmen will stick to the traditional commitment of 39 training days a year, Lengyel said that’s not the case for all Guard soldiers.

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Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
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The number of days a unit trains depends on where it falls within the sustainable readiness model, Parmer said.

The sustainable readiness model for certain units has 39 days in the first year, 48 days in the second year, 60 days in the third year and 51 days in the fourth year, Lengyel said.

Select high-priority units have already transitioned to this four-year collective training cycle, Parmer said.

Lengyel said this training model should be sustainable for most Guardsmen, but he anticipates some soldiers will have to make changes.

“We’re in cycle one of this … the trick for us is to see how are we going to be able to do this in cycle two and three and beyond,” he said. “Is this sustainable? We tend to think it is, but I predict there will be some changes.”

Some soldiers’ civilian lives might not be able to tolerate the increased training, he said.

These soldiers might have to cross train to do another job that doesn’t require so many training days away from their civilian jobs and lives.

“Some of these people will be able to adapt, and they’ll do it,” he said. “As we recruit new people into the bottom of the organization, they won’t know any different, and it will be the new way the Army National Guard works.”

Lengyel said one way for Guard units to be ready faster is to increase the number of full-time support personnel.

About 16 percent of the Army National Guard is full time, and adding to that would help the Guard maintain equipment better and get more training down, he said.

“The only reason you have full-time people in the Army National Guard is to train part-time folks,” Lengyel said. “Without the full-time force there to do it, we’re not going to be able to maintain that.”

References

  1. ^ Army National Guard 4.0 (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ deploy faster (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ high-priority units (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ 3-star: More training days for the Guard as the Army struggles with readiness (www.armytimes.com)
0

Some soldiers may not be able to handle new pace of training, Guard chief says

The head of the National Guard Bureau says he believes the increased training days with the Army National Guard 4.0[1] initiative are sustainable but predicts some soldiers might need to make changes.

Gen. Joseph Lengyel, speaking Monday at an Association of the United States Army forum, said the 4.0 initiative focuses on certain units that need to deploy faster[2].

These high-priority units[3] include heavy armored brigade combat teams and Stryker brigade combat teams.

“We are changing the operational deployment tempo and the training tempo of the Army National Guard,” Lengyel said.

Beginning this year, four brigades — instead of two — will train at combat training centers each year, according to bureau spokesman Lt. Col. Wes Parmer. By fiscal 2019, seven brigades will participate in war-fighter staff exercises and exportable CTC rotations every year.

For example, the Tennessee National Guard’s 278th Armored Brigade Combat Team will complete a rotation at Fort Irwin’s National Training Center this spring. The soldiers will deploy overseas later this summer in support of NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence mission, Parmer told Army Times via email.

Although many Guardsmen will stick to the traditional commitment of 39 training days a year, Lengyel said that’s not the case for all Guard soldiers.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The number of days a unit trains depends on where it falls within the sustainable readiness model, Parmer said.

The sustainable readiness model for certain units has 39 days in the first year, 48 days in the second year, 60 days in the third year and 51 days in the fourth year, Lengyel said.

Select high-priority units have already transitioned to this four-year collective training cycle, Parmer said.

Lengyel said this training model should be sustainable for most Guardsmen, but he anticipates some soldiers will have to make changes.

“We’re in cycle one of this … the trick for us is to see how are we going to be able to do this in cycle two and three and beyond,” he said. “Is this sustainable? We tend to think it is, but I predict there will be some changes.”

Some soldiers’ civilian lives might not be able to tolerate the increased training, he said.

These soldiers might have to cross train to do another job that doesn’t require so many training days away from their civilian jobs and lives.

“Some of these people will be able to adapt, and they’ll do it,” he said. “As we recruit new people into the bottom of the organization, they won’t know any different, and it will be the new way the Army National Guard works.”

Lengyel said one way for Guard units to be ready faster is to increase the number of full-time support personnel.

About 16 percent of the Army National Guard is full time, and adding to that would help the Guard maintain equipment better and get more training down, he said.

“The only reason you have full-time people in the Army National Guard is to train part-time folks,” Lengyel said. “Without the full-time force there to do it, we’re not going to be able to maintain that.”

References

  1. ^ Army National Guard 4.0 (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ deploy faster (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ high-priority units (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ 3-star: More training days for the Guard as the Army struggles with readiness (www.armytimes.com)
0

Some soldiers may not be able to handle new pace of training, Guard chief says

The head of the National Guard Bureau says he believes the increased training days with the Army National Guard 4.0[1] initiative are sustainable but predicts some soldiers might need to make changes.

Gen. Joseph Lengyel, speaking Monday at an Association of the United States Army forum, said the 4.0 initiative focuses on certain units that need to deploy faster[2].

These high-priority units[3] include heavy armored brigade combat teams and Stryker brigade combat teams.

“We are changing the operational deployment tempo and the training tempo of the Army National Guard,” Lengyel said.

Beginning this year, four brigades — instead of two — will train at combat training centers each year, according to bureau spokesman Lt. Col. Wes Parmer. By fiscal 2019, seven brigades will participate in war-fighter staff exercises and exportable CTC rotations every year.

For example, the Tennessee National Guard’s 278th Armored Brigade Combat Team will complete a rotation at Fort Irwin’s National Training Center this spring. The soldiers will deploy overseas later this summer in support of NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence mission, Parmer told Army Times via email.

Although many Guardsmen will stick to the traditional commitment of 39 training days a year, Lengyel said that’s not the case for all Guard soldiers.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The number of days a unit trains depends on where it falls within the sustainable readiness model, Parmer said.

The sustainable readiness model for certain units has 39 days in the first year, 48 days in the second year, 60 days in the third year and 51 days in the fourth year, Lengyel said.

Select high-priority units have already transitioned to this four-year collective training cycle, Parmer said.

Lengyel said this training model should be sustainable for most Guardsmen, but he anticipates some soldiers will have to make changes.

“We’re in cycle one of this … the trick for us is to see how are we going to be able to do this in cycle two and three and beyond,” he said. “Is this sustainable? We tend to think it is, but I predict there will be some changes.”

Some soldiers’ civilian lives might not be able to tolerate the increased training, he said.

These soldiers might have to cross train to do another job that doesn’t require so many training days away from their civilian jobs and lives.

“Some of these people will be able to adapt, and they’ll do it,” he said. “As we recruit new people into the bottom of the organization, they won’t know any different, and it will be the new way the Army National Guard works.”

Lengyel said one way for Guard units to be ready faster is to increase the number of full-time support personnel.

About 16 percent of the Army National Guard is full time, and adding to that would help the Guard maintain equipment better and get more training down, he said.

“The only reason you have full-time people in the Army National Guard is to train part-time folks,” Lengyel said. “Without the full-time force there to do it, we’re not going to be able to maintain that.”

References

  1. ^ Army National Guard 4.0 (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ deploy faster (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ high-priority units (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ 3-star: More training days for the Guard as the Army struggles with readiness (www.armytimes.com)
0

Some soldiers may not be able to handle new pace of training, Guard chief says

The head of the National Guard Bureau says he believes the increased training days with the Army National Guard 4.0[1] initiative are sustainable but predicts some soldiers might need to make changes.

Gen. Joseph Lengyel, speaking Monday at an Association of the United States Army forum, said the 4.0 initiative focuses on certain units that need to deploy faster[2].

These high-priority units[3] include heavy armored brigade combat teams and Stryker brigade combat teams.

“We are changing the operational deployment tempo and the training tempo of the Army National Guard,” Lengyel said.

Beginning this year, four brigades — instead of two — will train at combat training centers each year, according to bureau spokesman Lt. Col. Wes Parmer. By fiscal 2019, seven brigades will participate in war-fighter staff exercises and exportable CTC rotations every year.

For example, the Tennessee National Guard’s 278th Armored Brigade Combat Team will complete a rotation at Fort Irwin’s National Training Center this spring. The soldiers will deploy overseas later this summer in support of NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence mission, Parmer told Army Times via email.

Although many Guardsmen will stick to the traditional commitment of 39 training days a year, Lengyel said that’s not the case for all Guard soldiers.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The number of days a unit trains depends on where it falls within the sustainable readiness model, Parmer said.

The sustainable readiness model for certain units has 39 days in the first year, 48 days in the second year, 60 days in the third year and 51 days in the fourth year, Lengyel said.

Select high-priority units have already transitioned to this four-year collective training cycle, Parmer said.

Lengyel said this training model should be sustainable for most Guardsmen, but he anticipates some soldiers will have to make changes.

“We’re in cycle one of this … the trick for us is to see how are we going to be able to do this in cycle two and three and beyond,” he said. “Is this sustainable? We tend to think it is, but I predict there will be some changes.”

Some soldiers’ civilian lives might not be able to tolerate the increased training, he said.

These soldiers might have to cross train to do another job that doesn’t require so many training days away from their civilian jobs and lives.

“Some of these people will be able to adapt, and they’ll do it,” he said. “As we recruit new people into the bottom of the organization, they won’t know any different, and it will be the new way the Army National Guard works.”

Lengyel said one way for Guard units to be ready faster is to increase the number of full-time support personnel.

About 16 percent of the Army National Guard is full time, and adding to that would help the Guard maintain equipment better and get more training down, he said.

“The only reason you have full-time people in the Army National Guard is to train part-time folks,” Lengyel said. “Without the full-time force there to do it, we’re not going to be able to maintain that.”

References

  1. ^ Army National Guard 4.0 (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ deploy faster (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ high-priority units (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ 3-star: More training days for the Guard as the Army struggles with readiness (www.armytimes.com)