Tagged: training

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116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

Sri Lanka bus explosion injures 19, including 12 military personnel-spokesman

COLOMBO (Reuters) – Nineteen people including 12 military personnel were injured on Wednesday in an explosion on a bus in Sri Lanka, said the military, adding they do not know the cause but suspect it may be a bomb or grenade.

Since the end of Sri Lanka’s nearly three-decade civil war in 2009 there have been no targeted attacks on the military.

“There had been an explosion in a passenger bus. There are some fragments on the body of the bus. We suspect it as a bomb blast,” military spokesman Sumith Atapattu told Reuters.

“The investigations underway to find out the details.”

Atapattu said seven army and five air force personnel along with seven civilians were injured in a fire following the explosion on the passenger bus which operated from northern Jaffna peninsula to central town of Diyathalawa, where one of the main military training centers is located.

Sri Lanka ended a 26-year separatist war in May 2009 defeating Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) who fought to carve out a separate state for ethnic minority Tamil’s in the far north of the Indian ocean island nation.

Tamil Tiger rebels commonly used Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) to target civilians and military personnel during the civil war, which killed at least 100,000 people.

Reporting by Ranga Sirilal and Shihar Aneez; Editing by Michael Perry

References

  1. ^ The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. (thomsonreuters.com)
0

South Korea to announce joint military drill plan with US before April

SEOUL (Reuters) – South Korea and the United States will announce plans before April for a postponed joint military drill, South Korea’s defense minister said on Tuesday.

Seoul and Washington had agreed to postpone the regular joint military exercise until after the Winter Olympics and Paralympics being hosted in South Korea, which end on March 18.

After the decision to delay the joint exercise, North Korea agreed to hold the first official talks with South Korea in more than two years and send athletes to the Winter Games, easing a standoff over Pyongyang’s nuclear and missile programmes.

Asked when the two countries will hold the postponed drill, Song Young-moo told parliament he and his U.S. counterpart, Jim Mattis, would make an announcement between March 18 and the start of April.

“The exercise was postponed according to the spirit of the Olympics,” Song said. “We have agreed to uphold the basis until after the Paralympics…and not to confirm nor deny anything regarding what we would do after that until we announce it”.

Song added inter-Korean talks had not come about as a direct result of the postponed drill.

Pyongyang has warned it would not sit idle if the United States and South Korea push ahead with the postponed military exercises.

North Korea denounces the drills as preparations to invade it, and it has at times conducted missile tests or taken other aggressive action in response.

The South Korean and U.S. militaries usually hold military exercises called Key Resolve and Foal Eagle in March and April, which can involve as many as 17,000 U.S. troops and more than 300,000 South Koreans.

South Korean Army K1A1 and U.S. Army M1A2 tanks fire live rounds during a U.S.-South Korea joint live-fire military exercise, at a training field, near the demilitarized zone, separating the two Koreas in Pocheon, South Korea April 21, 2017. Picture taken on April 21, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

South Korea’s Unification Minister Cho Myong-gyon said talks to stage the postponed military drill were moving forward.

“I‘m aware negotiations are moving towards a direction where the drills will be held,” Cho said in a separate parliamentary session on Tuesday, without elaborating.

A restart of the joint drill is an “act of ruthlessly trampling even a small sprout of peace that has been now seen on the Korean peninsula”, the North’s official KCNA news agency said in a commentary on Monday.

“It is a provocative act of chilling the active efforts of the DPRK and enthusiasm of the international community to defuse tension and create a peaceful environment”.

North Korea’s official name is the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK).

Tensions on the Korean peninsula have eased since last year resulting in inter-Korean talks and the North sending a high-level delegation led by Kim Yo Jong, the sister of leader Kim Jong Un, and athletes to the Winter Olympics.

South Korea has also floated the idea of co-hosting the 2021 Asian Winter Games with North Korea, and a North Korean official said on Tuesday this may be possible, reported the South’s Yonhap news agency.

North Korea may make the North’s Masikryong ski resort available for the Games, said Chang Ung, the North’s representative on the International Olympic Committee.

The host city for the 2021 event has not yet been decided.

Speaking to a Yonhap reporter at an airport in Beijing, the Chinese capital, Chang said it would be easier for the two sides to co-host the 2021 Asian Winter Games because there is less competition to host them, compared to the Olympics.

As to how that could come about, Chang declined to say, according to Yonhap. He was on his way back to North Korea after observing the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang.

Reporting by Christine Kim and Hyonhee Shin; Editing by Michael Perry and Clarence Fernandez

References

  1. ^ The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. (thomsonreuters.com)
0

South Korea to announce joint military drill plan with US before April

SEOUL (Reuters) – South Korea and the United States will announce plans before April for a postponed joint military drill, South Korea’s defense minister said on Tuesday.

Seoul and Washington had agreed to postpone the regular joint military exercise until after the Winter Olympics and Paralympics being hosted in South Korea, which end on March 18.

After the decision to delay the joint exercise, North Korea agreed to hold the first official talks with South Korea in more than two years and send athletes to the Winter Games, easing a standoff over Pyongyang’s nuclear and missile programmes.

Asked when the two countries will hold the postponed drill, Song Young-moo told parliament he and his U.S. counterpart, Jim Mattis, would make an announcement between March 18 and the start of April.

“The exercise was postponed according to the spirit of the Olympics,” Song said. “We have agreed to uphold the basis until after the Paralympics…and not to confirm nor deny anything regarding what we would do after that until we announce it”.

Song added inter-Korean talks had not come about as a direct result of the postponed drill.

Pyongyang has warned it would not sit idle if the United States and South Korea push ahead with the postponed military exercises.

North Korea denounces the drills as preparations to invade it, and it has at times conducted missile tests or taken other aggressive action in response.

The South Korean and U.S. militaries usually hold military exercises called Key Resolve and Foal Eagle in March and April, which can involve as many as 17,000 U.S. troops and more than 300,000 South Koreans.

South Korean Army K1A1 and U.S. Army M1A2 tanks fire live rounds during a U.S.-South Korea joint live-fire military exercise, at a training field, near the demilitarized zone, separating the two Koreas in Pocheon, South Korea April 21, 2017. Picture taken on April 21, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

South Korea’s Unification Minister Cho Myong-gyon said talks to stage the postponed military drill were moving forward.

“I‘m aware negotiations are moving towards a direction where the drills will be held,” Cho said in a separate parliamentary session on Tuesday, without elaborating.

A restart of the joint drill is an “act of ruthlessly trampling even a small sprout of peace that has been now seen on the Korean peninsula”, the North’s official KCNA news agency said in a commentary on Monday.

“It is a provocative act of chilling the active efforts of the DPRK and enthusiasm of the international community to defuse tension and create a peaceful environment”.

North Korea’s official name is the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK).

Tensions on the Korean peninsula have eased since last year resulting in inter-Korean talks and the North sending a high-level delegation led by Kim Yo Jong, the sister of leader Kim Jong Un, and athletes to the Winter Olympics.

South Korea has also floated the idea of co-hosting the 2021 Asian Winter Games with North Korea, and a North Korean official said on Tuesday this may be possible, reported the South’s Yonhap news agency.

North Korea may make the North’s Masikryong ski resort available for the Games, said Chang Ung, the North’s representative on the International Olympic Committee.

The host city for the 2021 event has not yet been decided.

Speaking to a Yonhap reporter at an airport in Beijing, the Chinese capital, Chang said it would be easier for the two sides to co-host the 2021 Asian Winter Games because there is less competition to host them, compared to the Olympics.

As to how that could come about, Chang declined to say, according to Yonhap. He was on his way back to North Korea after observing the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang.

Reporting by Christine Kim and Hyonhee Shin; Editing by Michael Perry and Clarence Fernandez

References

  1. ^ The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. (thomsonreuters.com)