Tagged: terrain

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1ST BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: 1-32nd CAV demonstrates lethality at gunnery training

Bandits from 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, recently conducted crew gunnery training to confirm mastery of motorized crew fundamentals and maximize lethality.

The two-week gunnery training that ended Friday qualified 49 crews on their assigned machine guns; MK19 grenade launchers; and tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided missiles, building crew confidence in the process.

Captain Daniel T. Little, commander, A Troop 1-32nd Cav. Regt., said Bandit troopers need to be proficient in crew tasks and weapons systems so they are able to conduct continuous reconnaissance and surveillance operations in any environment.

“This gunnery exercise tested the Bandits in a variety of harsh weather conditions including periods of daylight and darkness which increased the overall complexity. Crews were forced to transition rapidly between optics and lasers in order to identify and engage multiple targets within the time limit.  Our crews executed their tasks expertly,” Little said.

Specialist Luis Abad, an A Troop gunner, said his favorite part of gunnery was “waking up in the cold” because it built up his character as an individual and Soldier. Not only did gunnery build the grit and resilience of Bandit troopers, but it also reinforced the “deploy and fight now mentality” that is first on the 1st BCT commander’s list of expectations for the Bastogne brigade.

“Anything can happen in combat and gunnery allowed [my] whole crew to move and execute using live rounds, giving everyone a good grasp of what their job is within the truck,” said Spc. Joseph Levato, a B Troop MK19 gunner.

The Bandits recognized the importance of growing as teammates within their crews during gunnery in order to maximize their performance and lethality.

“[Gunnery] helped me develop by giving me a hands on situation for engaging targets while working as a [mounted] team [member], unlike regular ranges that usually focus on individual performance,” said Pfc. Louis Dekany, an A Troop gunner. “It develops everyone’s roles within the team.”

The teamwork of the crews led them to succeed in the competition for the coveted title of “Top Gun,” awarded to the highest-performing crew for each weapon system at gunnery.

Winning crews included Sgt. David Kelly, Spc. Brando Cervantes, and Pvt. James Osburn for the TOW system; Sgt. 1st Class Eric Harder, Sgt. Ayrton Leiser, and Pvt. Brandon Beecher for the MK19; Sgt. Seth Jarrell, Spc. Jonathan Passman, and Pfc. Nickalas Woody for machine gun; and Lt. Col. Adisa King, Spc. Zackery Khan, and Spc. Austin Heiser for the Commander’s Cup on the mine-resistant ambush-protected, all-terrain vehicle. The competition sparked crews to work harder and outperform each other.

Staff Sergeant Anthony Renza, a senior scout in B Troop, said his favorite part of gunnery was “being in the running for Top Gun and seeing [his] crew come alive with motivation and drive to succeed.”

Notably, D Troop successfully qualified nine crews, which is the highest number of qualified crews in any forward support company in Bastogne. D Troop now holds the only qualified crew of food service specialists. This shows the unit’s focus on ensuring every trooper is trained and ready for combat, no matter their military occupational specialty.

The troopers of 1st Squadron developed their fundamental motorized crew skills, contributed to 1-32nd CAV’s readiness, and displayed their proficiency and lethality during gunnery training. The Bandits will continue to train to ensure they have the most lethal crews in the brigade and are ready to fight and conduct reconnaissance whenever called, in any conditions.

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1ST BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: 1-32nd CAV demonstrates lethality …

Bandits from 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, recently conducted crew gunnery training to confirm mastery of motorized crew fundamentals and maximize lethality.

The two-week gunnery training that ended Friday qualified 49 crews on their assigned machine guns; MK19 grenade launchers; and tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided missiles, building crew confidence in the process.

Captain Daniel T. Little, commander, A Troop 1-32nd Cav. Regt., said Bandit troopers need to be proficient in crew tasks and weapons systems so they are able to conduct continuous reconnaissance and surveillance operations in any environment.

“This gunnery exercise tested the Bandits in a variety of harsh weather conditions including periods of daylight and darkness which increased the overall complexity. Crews were forced to transition rapidly between optics and lasers in order to identify and engage multiple targets within the time limit.  Our crews executed their tasks expertly,” Little said.

Specialist Luis Abad, an A Troop gunner, said his favorite part of gunnery was “waking up in the cold” because it built up his character as an individual and Soldier. Not only did gunnery build the grit and resilience of Bandit troopers, but it also reinforced the “deploy and fight now mentality” that is first on the 1st BCT commander’s list of expectations for the Bastogne brigade.

“Anything can happen in combat and gunnery allowed [my] whole crew to move and execute using live rounds, giving everyone a good grasp of what their job is within the truck,” said Spc. Joseph Levato, a B Troop MK19 gunner.

The Bandits recognized the importance of growing as teammates within their crews during gunnery in order to maximize their performance and lethality.

“[Gunnery] helped me develop by giving me a hands on situation for engaging targets while working as a [mounted] team [member], unlike regular ranges that usually focus on individual performance,” said Pfc. Louis Dekany, an A Troop gunner. “It develops everyone’s roles within the team.”

The teamwork of the crews led them to succeed in the competition for the coveted title of “Top Gun,” awarded to the highest-performing crew for each weapon system at gunnery.

Winning crews included Sgt. David Kelly, Spc. Brando Cervantes, and Pvt. James Osburn for the TOW system; Sgt. 1st Class Eric Harder, Sgt. Ayrton Leiser, and Pvt. Brandon Beecher for the MK19; Sgt. Seth Jarrell, Spc. Jonathan Passman, and Pfc. Nickalas Woody for machine gun; and Lt. Col. Adisa King, Spc. Zackery Khan, and Spc. Austin Heiser for the Commander’s Cup on the mine-resistant ambush-protected, all-terrain vehicle. The competition sparked crews to work harder and outperform each other.

Staff Sergeant Anthony Renza, a senior scout in B Troop, said his favorite part of gunnery was “being in the running for Top Gun and seeing [his] crew come alive with motivation and drive to succeed.”

Notably, D Troop successfully qualified nine crews, which is the highest number of qualified crews in any forward support company in Bastogne. D Troop now holds the only qualified crew of food service specialists. This shows the unit’s focus on ensuring every trooper is trained and ready for combat, no matter their military occupational specialty.

The troopers of 1st Squadron developed their fundamental motorized crew skills, contributed to 1-32nd CAV’s readiness, and displayed their proficiency and lethality during gunnery training. The Bandits will continue to train to ensure they have the most lethal crews in the brigade and are ready to fight and conduct reconnaissance whenever called, in any conditions.

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1ST BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: 1-32nd CAV demonstrates lethality …

Bandits from 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, recently conducted crew gunnery training to confirm mastery of motorized crew fundamentals and maximize lethality.

The two-week gunnery training that ended Friday qualified 49 crews on their assigned machine guns; MK19 grenade launchers; and tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided missiles, building crew confidence in the process.

Captain Daniel T. Little, commander, A Troop 1-32nd Cav. Regt., said Bandit troopers need to be proficient in crew tasks and weapons systems so they are able to conduct continuous reconnaissance and surveillance operations in any environment.

“This gunnery exercise tested the Bandits in a variety of harsh weather conditions including periods of daylight and darkness which increased the overall complexity. Crews were forced to transition rapidly between optics and lasers in order to identify and engage multiple targets within the time limit.  Our crews executed their tasks expertly,” Little said.

Specialist Luis Abad, an A Troop gunner, said his favorite part of gunnery was “waking up in the cold” because it built up his character as an individual and Soldier. Not only did gunnery build the grit and resilience of Bandit troopers, but it also reinforced the “deploy and fight now mentality” that is first on the 1st BCT commander’s list of expectations for the Bastogne brigade.

“Anything can happen in combat and gunnery allowed [my] whole crew to move and execute using live rounds, giving everyone a good grasp of what their job is within the truck,” said Spc. Joseph Levato, a B Troop MK19 gunner.

The Bandits recognized the importance of growing as teammates within their crews during gunnery in order to maximize their performance and lethality.

“[Gunnery] helped me develop by giving me a hands on situation for engaging targets while working as a [mounted] team [member], unlike regular ranges that usually focus on individual performance,” said Pfc. Louis Dekany, an A Troop gunner. “It develops everyone’s roles within the team.”

The teamwork of the crews led them to succeed in the competition for the coveted title of “Top Gun,” awarded to the highest-performing crew for each weapon system at gunnery.

Winning crews included Sgt. David Kelly, Spc. Brando Cervantes, and Pvt. James Osburn for the TOW system; Sgt. 1st Class Eric Harder, Sgt. Ayrton Leiser, and Pvt. Brandon Beecher for the MK19; Sgt. Seth Jarrell, Spc. Jonathan Passman, and Pfc. Nickalas Woody for machine gun; and Lt. Col. Adisa King, Spc. Zackery Khan, and Spc. Austin Heiser for the Commander’s Cup on the mine-resistant ambush-protected, all-terrain vehicle. The competition sparked crews to work harder and outperform each other.

Staff Sergeant Anthony Renza, a senior scout in B Troop, said his favorite part of gunnery was “being in the running for Top Gun and seeing [his] crew come alive with motivation and drive to succeed.”

Notably, D Troop successfully qualified nine crews, which is the highest number of qualified crews in any forward support company in Bastogne. D Troop now holds the only qualified crew of food service specialists. This shows the unit’s focus on ensuring every trooper is trained and ready for combat, no matter their military occupational specialty.

The troopers of 1st Squadron developed their fundamental motorized crew skills, contributed to 1-32nd CAV’s readiness, and displayed their proficiency and lethality during gunnery training. The Bandits will continue to train to ensure they have the most lethal crews in the brigade and are ready to fight and conduct reconnaissance whenever called, in any conditions.

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Finland develops 'bounding' mine as military deterrence

HELSINKI (Reuters) – Finland is developing a remotely-detonated mine designed to deter enemies with its “horror”, the country’s defense minister said on Thursday, referring to a device that springs into the air and fires projectiles at its target when triggered.

Finnish Defence Minister Jussi Niinisto meets the press to discuss topical security issues in Helsinki, Finland March 8, 2018, Lehtikuva/Emmi Korhonen/via REUTERS

Defence Minister Jussi Niinisto said the defense forces were developing the so-called bounding mine to replace landmines banned by a 1999 international treaty. Its main targets would be soldiers and vehicles.

“This is a remotely tripped explosive, which bounds in the air and fires steel or tungsten bullets downwards,” the minister told reporters.

“This gives quite a good regional effect and deterrence effect, the so called mine horror. This is being tested now.”

In 2011, Finland became the last European Union country to ratify the 1999 Ottawa Convention, which prohibits the use, stockpiling, production and transfer of anti-personnel landmines.

Finland’s ratification has lately come in for criticism domestically from some Finns who argue landmines could be effective in defending the country’s long borders.

Finland shares a 1,340km (833 miles) border and a difficult history with Russia, and following Moscow’s annexation of Crimea in 2014, it has stepped up military spending.

Finnish Defence Minister Jussi Niinisto meets the press to discuss topical security issues in Helsinki, Finland March 8, 2018, Lehtikuva/Emmi Korhonen/via REUTERS

Niinisto said he was not aware of a similar explosive being used somewhere else, and the Finnish weapon would always be fired by its operator.

According to the Ottawa Treaty, the launcher of such a mine must have direct visual contact with the location upon triggering it, a ministry official specified. The mines banned by the convention involve explosives set off by the proximity of, or contact with, the target.

“This is an explosive that fits well into the Finnish terrain… traditional mines explode upwards or sideways. This fires downwards, so it is more difficult to take cover from it,” Niinisto said.

He added that he had seen international interest for the weapon.

Niinisto, who considers the ratification of the Ottawa convention to have been a mistake, also said that Finland could relinquish the landmine ban during a crisis where “all agreements have become meaningless papers”.

Finland has compulsory military service for all men and it is one of six members of the EU that have not also joined NATO.

In recent years, however, it has forged closer ties with the Western military alliance, while stepping defense cooperation with other Nordic countries.

While backed by most countries, the Ottawa treaty has not been signed by a number of countries including the United States, China, India, and Russia.

Reporting by Jussi Rosendahl, Editing by William Maclean

References

  1. ^ The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. (thomsonreuters.com)
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3RD BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: Chemical training

The 3rd Brigade Combat Team’s chemical reconnaissance platoon, 21st Brigade Engineer Battalion, recently trained to respond to a Level-A Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear incident as part of the unit’s ongoing platoon Military Operations in Urban Terrain training.

On Jan. 31, Soldiers from C Company conducted room-clearing operations after one of their squads was “killed” by a chemical agent. Putting on their gas masks, the unit then called in for support from the chemical reconnaissance platoon. Donning gas masks to prevent further casualties, they continued to clear buildings and provide security.

Sergeant Robin Hood, a signal noncommissioned officer with C Co., 21st BEB, 3rd BCT, 101st Airborne Division, said CBRN training is a great opportunity to train his squad on tactics they might face in real world situations.

“We have a high operational tempo in our company, so we’re always on mission doing comms for our brigade and battalion,” Hood said.   “We don’t get a chance to do these Soldier skills normally, so it’s a good refresher and good training for these guys, since we have a lot of new guys in the unit.”

Once on site, 1st Lt Connor Pearce, the platoon leader, and Sgt. Nico Valencia, the initial entry team leader, geared up in Level-A hazardous material suits, complete with oxygen tanks. Heading into the building, they measured for radiation levels, composition of the air and conducted tests on the lab where the chemical agent was set up to determine how to dispose of it.

“It’s exhilarating,” Pearce said. “There’s always an adventure factor. Getting into the suit, going into a situation where you have no idea what’s going on at all. There’s hazards associated with it, so it’s fun to get into the suit and figure out the unknown.”

Captain Spencer Hunt, a chemical officer with the 101st Airborne Division CBRN cell, said the training allows the members of the chemical reconnaissance platoon to get an idea of what they might see in a real CBRN situation, from dealing with a production site to storage and transport areas.

“It helps them see what it would look like in real life,” Hunt said. “It would look pretty much like that, a production center set in a room somewhere, or a storage facility, or collection site.”

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3RD BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: Chemical training

The 3rd Brigade Combat Team’s chemical reconnaissance platoon, 21st Brigade Engineer Battalion, recently trained to respond to a Level-A Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear incident as part of the unit’s ongoing platoon Military Operations in Urban Terrain training.

On Jan. 31, Soldiers from C Company conducted room-clearing operations after one of their squads was “killed” by a chemical agent. Putting on their gas masks, the unit then called in for support from the chemical reconnaissance platoon. Donning gas masks to prevent further casualties, they continued to clear buildings and provide security.

Sergeant Robin Hood, a signal noncommissioned officer with C Co., 21st BEB, 3rd BCT, 101st Airborne Division, said CBRN training is a great opportunity to train his squad on tactics they might face in real world situations.

“We have a high operational tempo in our company, so we’re always on mission doing comms for our brigade and battalion,” Hood said.   “We don’t get a chance to do these Soldier skills normally, so it’s a good refresher and good training for these guys, since we have a lot of new guys in the unit.”

Once on site, 1st Lt Connor Pearce, the platoon leader, and Sgt. Nico Valencia, the initial entry team leader, geared up in Level-A hazardous material suits, complete with oxygen tanks. Heading into the building, they measured for radiation levels, composition of the air and conducted tests on the lab where the chemical agent was set up to determine how to dispose of it.

“It’s exhilarating,” Pearce said. “There’s always an adventure factor. Getting into the suit, going into a situation where you have no idea what’s going on at all. There’s hazards associated with it, so it’s fun to get into the suit and figure out the unknown.”

Captain Spencer Hunt, a chemical officer with the 101st Airborne Division CBRN cell, said the training allows the members of the chemical reconnaissance platoon to get an idea of what they might see in a real CBRN situation, from dealing with a production site to storage and transport areas.

“It helps them see what it would look like in real life,” Hunt said. “It would look pretty much like that, a production center set in a room somewhere, or a storage facility, or collection site.”

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3RD BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: Chemical training

The 3rd Brigade Combat Team’s chemical reconnaissance platoon, 21st Brigade Engineer Battalion, recently trained to respond to a Level-A Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear incident as part of the unit’s ongoing platoon Military Operations in Urban Terrain training.

On Jan. 31, Soldiers from C Company conducted room-clearing operations after one of their squads was “killed” by a chemical agent. Putting on their gas masks, the unit then called in for support from the chemical reconnaissance platoon. Donning gas masks to prevent further casualties, they continued to clear buildings and provide security.

Sergeant Robin Hood, a signal noncommissioned officer with C Co., 21st BEB, 3rd BCT, 101st Airborne Division, said CBRN training is a great opportunity to train his squad on tactics they might face in real world situations.

“We have a high operational tempo in our company, so we’re always on mission doing comms for our brigade and battalion,” Hood said.   “We don’t get a chance to do these Soldier skills normally, so it’s a good refresher and good training for these guys, since we have a lot of new guys in the unit.”

Once on site, 1st Lt Connor Pearce, the platoon leader, and Sgt. Nico Valencia, the initial entry team leader, geared up in Level-A hazardous material suits, complete with oxygen tanks. Heading into the building, they measured for radiation levels, composition of the air and conducted tests on the lab where the chemical agent was set up to determine how to dispose of it.

“It’s exhilarating,” Pearce said. “There’s always an adventure factor. Getting into the suit, going into a situation where you have no idea what’s going on at all. There’s hazards associated with it, so it’s fun to get into the suit and figure out the unknown.”

Captain Spencer Hunt, a chemical officer with the 101st Airborne Division CBRN cell, said the training allows the members of the chemical reconnaissance platoon to get an idea of what they might see in a real CBRN situation, from dealing with a production site to storage and transport areas.

“It helps them see what it would look like in real life,” Hunt said. “It would look pretty much like that, a production center set in a room somewhere, or a storage facility, or collection site.”

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3RD BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: Chemical training

The 3rd Brigade Combat Team’s chemical reconnaissance platoon, 21st Brigade Engineer Battalion, recently trained to respond to a Level-A Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear incident as part of the unit’s ongoing platoon Military Operations in Urban Terrain training.

On Jan. 31, Soldiers from C Company conducted room-clearing operations after one of their squads was “killed” by a chemical agent. Putting on their gas masks, the unit then called in for support from the chemical reconnaissance platoon. Donning gas masks to prevent further casualties, they continued to clear buildings and provide security.

Sergeant Robin Hood, a signal noncommissioned officer with C Co., 21st BEB, 3rd BCT, 101st Airborne Division, said CBRN training is a great opportunity to train his squad on tactics they might face in real world situations.

“We have a high operational tempo in our company, so we’re always on mission doing comms for our brigade and battalion,” Hood said.   “We don’t get a chance to do these Soldier skills normally, so it’s a good refresher and good training for these guys, since we have a lot of new guys in the unit.”

Once on site, 1st Lt Connor Pearce, the platoon leader, and Sgt. Nico Valencia, the initial entry team leader, geared up in Level-A hazardous material suits, complete with oxygen tanks. Heading into the building, they measured for radiation levels, composition of the air and conducted tests on the lab where the chemical agent was set up to determine how to dispose of it.

“It’s exhilarating,” Pearce said. “There’s always an adventure factor. Getting into the suit, going into a situation where you have no idea what’s going on at all. There’s hazards associated with it, so it’s fun to get into the suit and figure out the unknown.”

Captain Spencer Hunt, a chemical officer with the 101st Airborne Division CBRN cell, said the training allows the members of the chemical reconnaissance platoon to get an idea of what they might see in a real CBRN situation, from dealing with a production site to storage and transport areas.

“It helps them see what it would look like in real life,” Hunt said. “It would look pretty much like that, a production center set in a room somewhere, or a storage facility, or collection site.”

0

3RD BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: Chemical training

The 3rd Brigade Combat Team’s chemical reconnaissance platoon, 21st Brigade Engineer Battalion, recently trained to respond to a Level-A Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear incident as part of the unit’s ongoing platoon Military Operations in Urban Terrain training.

On Jan. 31, Soldiers from C Company conducted room-clearing operations after one of their squads was “killed” by a chemical agent. Putting on their gas masks, the unit then called in for support from the chemical reconnaissance platoon. Donning gas masks to prevent further casualties, they continued to clear buildings and provide security.

Sergeant Robin Hood, a signal noncommissioned officer with C Co., 21st BEB, 3rd BCT, 101st Airborne Division, said CBRN training is a great opportunity to train his squad on tactics they might face in real world situations.

“We have a high operational tempo in our company, so we’re always on mission doing comms for our brigade and battalion,” Hood said.   “We don’t get a chance to do these Soldier skills normally, so it’s a good refresher and good training for these guys, since we have a lot of new guys in the unit.”

Once on site, 1st Lt Connor Pearce, the platoon leader, and Sgt. Nico Valencia, the initial entry team leader, geared up in Level-A hazardous material suits, complete with oxygen tanks. Heading into the building, they measured for radiation levels, composition of the air and conducted tests on the lab where the chemical agent was set up to determine how to dispose of it.

“It’s exhilarating,” Pearce said. “There’s always an adventure factor. Getting into the suit, going into a situation where you have no idea what’s going on at all. There’s hazards associated with it, so it’s fun to get into the suit and figure out the unknown.”

Captain Spencer Hunt, a chemical officer with the 101st Airborne Division CBRN cell, said the training allows the members of the chemical reconnaissance platoon to get an idea of what they might see in a real CBRN situation, from dealing with a production site to storage and transport areas.

“It helps them see what it would look like in real life,” Hunt said. “It would look pretty much like that, a production center set in a room somewhere, or a storage facility, or collection site.”

0

3RD BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: Chemical training

The 3rd Brigade Combat Team’s chemical reconnaissance platoon, 21st Brigade Engineer Battalion, recently trained to respond to a Level-A Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear incident as part of the unit’s ongoing platoon Military Operations in Urban Terrain training.

On Jan. 31, Soldiers from C Company conducted room-clearing operations after one of their squads was “killed” by a chemical agent. Putting on their gas masks, the unit then called in for support from the chemical reconnaissance platoon. Donning gas masks to prevent further casualties, they continued to clear buildings and provide security.

Sergeant Robin Hood, a signal noncommissioned officer with C Co., 21st BEB, 3rd BCT, 101st Airborne Division, said CBRN training is a great opportunity to train his squad on tactics they might face in real world situations.

“We have a high operational tempo in our company, so we’re always on mission doing comms for our brigade and battalion,” Hood said.   “We don’t get a chance to do these Soldier skills normally, so it’s a good refresher and good training for these guys, since we have a lot of new guys in the unit.”

Once on site, 1st Lt Connor Pearce, the platoon leader, and Sgt. Nico Valencia, the initial entry team leader, geared up in Level-A hazardous material suits, complete with oxygen tanks. Heading into the building, they measured for radiation levels, composition of the air and conducted tests on the lab where the chemical agent was set up to determine how to dispose of it.

“It’s exhilarating,” Pearce said. “There’s always an adventure factor. Getting into the suit, going into a situation where you have no idea what’s going on at all. There’s hazards associated with it, so it’s fun to get into the suit and figure out the unknown.”

Captain Spencer Hunt, a chemical officer with the 101st Airborne Division CBRN cell, said the training allows the members of the chemical reconnaissance platoon to get an idea of what they might see in a real CBRN situation, from dealing with a production site to storage and transport areas.

“It helps them see what it would look like in real life,” Hunt said. “It would look pretty much like that, a production center set in a room somewhere, or a storage facility, or collection site.”