Tagged: targets

0

Military Strikes Target ISIS Terrorists in Syria, Iraq


SOUTHWEST ASIA —

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners continued to strike Islamic State of Iraq and Syria targets in designated parts of Syria and Iraq between April 27-May 3, conducting 27 strikes consisting of 35 engagements, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.  [1]

Strikes in Syria

Yesterday, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal.

On May 2, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes destroyed an ISIS storage facility.

On May 1, coalition military forces conducted five strikes consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets:

— Near Abu Kamal, four strikes damaged an ISIS-held building.

— Near Shadaddi, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two headquarters buildings.

On April 30, coalition military forces conducted 10 strikes consisting of 12 engagements against ISIS targets:

— Near Abu Kamal, six strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS staging area, a tunnel and a headquarters.

— Near Dayr Az Zawr, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit.

— Near Shadaddi, three strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle, two headquarters buildings and damaged three ISIS-held buildings.

On April 29, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets:

— A strike took place near Dayr Az Zawr.

— Near Shadaddi, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle.

Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes in Iraq May 2-3.

On May 1, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of eight engagements against ISIS targets:

— Near Huwijah, two strikes destroyed 31 ISIS tunnel systems and six caves.

— Near Rutbah, a strike destroyed an ISIS bunker.

On April 30, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets:

— Near Mosul, a strike destroyed an ISIS tunnel system.

–Near Rutbah, a strike destroyed an ISIS fighting position.

There were no reported strikes in Iraq on April 29.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said. [2]

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and ground-based tactical artillery, officials noted.

A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

References

  1. ^ Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve (www.inherentresolve.mil)
  2. ^ Operation Inherent Resolve (www.defense.gov)
0

1ST BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: 1-32nd CAV demonstrates lethality at gunnery training

Bandits from 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, recently conducted crew gunnery training to confirm mastery of motorized crew fundamentals and maximize lethality.

The two-week gunnery training that ended Friday qualified 49 crews on their assigned machine guns; MK19 grenade launchers; and tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided missiles, building crew confidence in the process.

Captain Daniel T. Little, commander, A Troop 1-32nd Cav. Regt., said Bandit troopers need to be proficient in crew tasks and weapons systems so they are able to conduct continuous reconnaissance and surveillance operations in any environment.

“This gunnery exercise tested the Bandits in a variety of harsh weather conditions including periods of daylight and darkness which increased the overall complexity. Crews were forced to transition rapidly between optics and lasers in order to identify and engage multiple targets within the time limit.  Our crews executed their tasks expertly,” Little said.

Specialist Luis Abad, an A Troop gunner, said his favorite part of gunnery was “waking up in the cold” because it built up his character as an individual and Soldier. Not only did gunnery build the grit and resilience of Bandit troopers, but it also reinforced the “deploy and fight now mentality” that is first on the 1st BCT commander’s list of expectations for the Bastogne brigade.

“Anything can happen in combat and gunnery allowed [my] whole crew to move and execute using live rounds, giving everyone a good grasp of what their job is within the truck,” said Spc. Joseph Levato, a B Troop MK19 gunner.

The Bandits recognized the importance of growing as teammates within their crews during gunnery in order to maximize their performance and lethality.

“[Gunnery] helped me develop by giving me a hands on situation for engaging targets while working as a [mounted] team [member], unlike regular ranges that usually focus on individual performance,” said Pfc. Louis Dekany, an A Troop gunner. “It develops everyone’s roles within the team.”

The teamwork of the crews led them to succeed in the competition for the coveted title of “Top Gun,” awarded to the highest-performing crew for each weapon system at gunnery.

Winning crews included Sgt. David Kelly, Spc. Brando Cervantes, and Pvt. James Osburn for the TOW system; Sgt. 1st Class Eric Harder, Sgt. Ayrton Leiser, and Pvt. Brandon Beecher for the MK19; Sgt. Seth Jarrell, Spc. Jonathan Passman, and Pfc. Nickalas Woody for machine gun; and Lt. Col. Adisa King, Spc. Zackery Khan, and Spc. Austin Heiser for the Commander’s Cup on the mine-resistant ambush-protected, all-terrain vehicle. The competition sparked crews to work harder and outperform each other.

Staff Sergeant Anthony Renza, a senior scout in B Troop, said his favorite part of gunnery was “being in the running for Top Gun and seeing [his] crew come alive with motivation and drive to succeed.”

Notably, D Troop successfully qualified nine crews, which is the highest number of qualified crews in any forward support company in Bastogne. D Troop now holds the only qualified crew of food service specialists. This shows the unit’s focus on ensuring every trooper is trained and ready for combat, no matter their military occupational specialty.

The troopers of 1st Squadron developed their fundamental motorized crew skills, contributed to 1-32nd CAV’s readiness, and displayed their proficiency and lethality during gunnery training. The Bandits will continue to train to ensure they have the most lethal crews in the brigade and are ready to fight and conduct reconnaissance whenever called, in any conditions.

0

1ST BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: 1-32nd CAV demonstrates lethality …

Bandits from 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, recently conducted crew gunnery training to confirm mastery of motorized crew fundamentals and maximize lethality.

The two-week gunnery training that ended Friday qualified 49 crews on their assigned machine guns; MK19 grenade launchers; and tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided missiles, building crew confidence in the process.

Captain Daniel T. Little, commander, A Troop 1-32nd Cav. Regt., said Bandit troopers need to be proficient in crew tasks and weapons systems so they are able to conduct continuous reconnaissance and surveillance operations in any environment.

“This gunnery exercise tested the Bandits in a variety of harsh weather conditions including periods of daylight and darkness which increased the overall complexity. Crews were forced to transition rapidly between optics and lasers in order to identify and engage multiple targets within the time limit.  Our crews executed their tasks expertly,” Little said.

Specialist Luis Abad, an A Troop gunner, said his favorite part of gunnery was “waking up in the cold” because it built up his character as an individual and Soldier. Not only did gunnery build the grit and resilience of Bandit troopers, but it also reinforced the “deploy and fight now mentality” that is first on the 1st BCT commander’s list of expectations for the Bastogne brigade.

“Anything can happen in combat and gunnery allowed [my] whole crew to move and execute using live rounds, giving everyone a good grasp of what their job is within the truck,” said Spc. Joseph Levato, a B Troop MK19 gunner.

The Bandits recognized the importance of growing as teammates within their crews during gunnery in order to maximize their performance and lethality.

“[Gunnery] helped me develop by giving me a hands on situation for engaging targets while working as a [mounted] team [member], unlike regular ranges that usually focus on individual performance,” said Pfc. Louis Dekany, an A Troop gunner. “It develops everyone’s roles within the team.”

The teamwork of the crews led them to succeed in the competition for the coveted title of “Top Gun,” awarded to the highest-performing crew for each weapon system at gunnery.

Winning crews included Sgt. David Kelly, Spc. Brando Cervantes, and Pvt. James Osburn for the TOW system; Sgt. 1st Class Eric Harder, Sgt. Ayrton Leiser, and Pvt. Brandon Beecher for the MK19; Sgt. Seth Jarrell, Spc. Jonathan Passman, and Pfc. Nickalas Woody for machine gun; and Lt. Col. Adisa King, Spc. Zackery Khan, and Spc. Austin Heiser for the Commander’s Cup on the mine-resistant ambush-protected, all-terrain vehicle. The competition sparked crews to work harder and outperform each other.

Staff Sergeant Anthony Renza, a senior scout in B Troop, said his favorite part of gunnery was “being in the running for Top Gun and seeing [his] crew come alive with motivation and drive to succeed.”

Notably, D Troop successfully qualified nine crews, which is the highest number of qualified crews in any forward support company in Bastogne. D Troop now holds the only qualified crew of food service specialists. This shows the unit’s focus on ensuring every trooper is trained and ready for combat, no matter their military occupational specialty.

The troopers of 1st Squadron developed their fundamental motorized crew skills, contributed to 1-32nd CAV’s readiness, and displayed their proficiency and lethality during gunnery training. The Bandits will continue to train to ensure they have the most lethal crews in the brigade and are ready to fight and conduct reconnaissance whenever called, in any conditions.

0

1ST BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: 1-32nd CAV demonstrates lethality …

Bandits from 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, recently conducted crew gunnery training to confirm mastery of motorized crew fundamentals and maximize lethality.

The two-week gunnery training that ended Friday qualified 49 crews on their assigned machine guns; MK19 grenade launchers; and tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided missiles, building crew confidence in the process.

Captain Daniel T. Little, commander, A Troop 1-32nd Cav. Regt., said Bandit troopers need to be proficient in crew tasks and weapons systems so they are able to conduct continuous reconnaissance and surveillance operations in any environment.

“This gunnery exercise tested the Bandits in a variety of harsh weather conditions including periods of daylight and darkness which increased the overall complexity. Crews were forced to transition rapidly between optics and lasers in order to identify and engage multiple targets within the time limit.  Our crews executed their tasks expertly,” Little said.

Specialist Luis Abad, an A Troop gunner, said his favorite part of gunnery was “waking up in the cold” because it built up his character as an individual and Soldier. Not only did gunnery build the grit and resilience of Bandit troopers, but it also reinforced the “deploy and fight now mentality” that is first on the 1st BCT commander’s list of expectations for the Bastogne brigade.

“Anything can happen in combat and gunnery allowed [my] whole crew to move and execute using live rounds, giving everyone a good grasp of what their job is within the truck,” said Spc. Joseph Levato, a B Troop MK19 gunner.

The Bandits recognized the importance of growing as teammates within their crews during gunnery in order to maximize their performance and lethality.

“[Gunnery] helped me develop by giving me a hands on situation for engaging targets while working as a [mounted] team [member], unlike regular ranges that usually focus on individual performance,” said Pfc. Louis Dekany, an A Troop gunner. “It develops everyone’s roles within the team.”

The teamwork of the crews led them to succeed in the competition for the coveted title of “Top Gun,” awarded to the highest-performing crew for each weapon system at gunnery.

Winning crews included Sgt. David Kelly, Spc. Brando Cervantes, and Pvt. James Osburn for the TOW system; Sgt. 1st Class Eric Harder, Sgt. Ayrton Leiser, and Pvt. Brandon Beecher for the MK19; Sgt. Seth Jarrell, Spc. Jonathan Passman, and Pfc. Nickalas Woody for machine gun; and Lt. Col. Adisa King, Spc. Zackery Khan, and Spc. Austin Heiser for the Commander’s Cup on the mine-resistant ambush-protected, all-terrain vehicle. The competition sparked crews to work harder and outperform each other.

Staff Sergeant Anthony Renza, a senior scout in B Troop, said his favorite part of gunnery was “being in the running for Top Gun and seeing [his] crew come alive with motivation and drive to succeed.”

Notably, D Troop successfully qualified nine crews, which is the highest number of qualified crews in any forward support company in Bastogne. D Troop now holds the only qualified crew of food service specialists. This shows the unit’s focus on ensuring every trooper is trained and ready for combat, no matter their military occupational specialty.

The troopers of 1st Squadron developed their fundamental motorized crew skills, contributed to 1-32nd CAV’s readiness, and displayed their proficiency and lethality during gunnery training. The Bandits will continue to train to ensure they have the most lethal crews in the brigade and are ready to fight and conduct reconnaissance whenever called, in any conditions.

0

Finland develops 'bounding' mine as military deterrence

HELSINKI (Reuters) – Finland is developing a remotely-detonated mine designed to deter enemies with its “horror”, the country’s defense minister said on Thursday, referring to a device that springs into the air and fires projectiles at its target when triggered.

Finnish Defence Minister Jussi Niinisto meets the press to discuss topical security issues in Helsinki, Finland March 8, 2018, Lehtikuva/Emmi Korhonen/via REUTERS

Defence Minister Jussi Niinisto said the defense forces were developing the so-called bounding mine to replace landmines banned by a 1999 international treaty. Its main targets would be soldiers and vehicles.

“This is a remotely tripped explosive, which bounds in the air and fires steel or tungsten bullets downwards,” the minister told reporters.

“This gives quite a good regional effect and deterrence effect, the so called mine horror. This is being tested now.”

In 2011, Finland became the last European Union country to ratify the 1999 Ottawa Convention, which prohibits the use, stockpiling, production and transfer of anti-personnel landmines.

Finland’s ratification has lately come in for criticism domestically from some Finns who argue landmines could be effective in defending the country’s long borders.

Finland shares a 1,340km (833 miles) border and a difficult history with Russia, and following Moscow’s annexation of Crimea in 2014, it has stepped up military spending.

Finnish Defence Minister Jussi Niinisto meets the press to discuss topical security issues in Helsinki, Finland March 8, 2018, Lehtikuva/Emmi Korhonen/via REUTERS

Niinisto said he was not aware of a similar explosive being used somewhere else, and the Finnish weapon would always be fired by its operator.

According to the Ottawa Treaty, the launcher of such a mine must have direct visual contact with the location upon triggering it, a ministry official specified. The mines banned by the convention involve explosives set off by the proximity of, or contact with, the target.

“This is an explosive that fits well into the Finnish terrain… traditional mines explode upwards or sideways. This fires downwards, so it is more difficult to take cover from it,” Niinisto said.

He added that he had seen international interest for the weapon.

Niinisto, who considers the ratification of the Ottawa convention to have been a mistake, also said that Finland could relinquish the landmine ban during a crisis where “all agreements have become meaningless papers”.

Finland has compulsory military service for all men and it is one of six members of the EU that have not also joined NATO.

In recent years, however, it has forged closer ties with the Western military alliance, while stepping defense cooperation with other Nordic countries.

While backed by most countries, the Ottawa treaty has not been signed by a number of countries including the United States, China, India, and Russia.

Reporting by Jussi Rosendahl, Editing by William Maclean

References

  1. ^ The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. (thomsonreuters.com)
0

U.S. officials pushing for drone identification requirement, new …

Drones carry bags from the Dolce & Gabbana Autumn/Winter 2018 women’s collection during Milan Fashion Week in Italy in February. The White House remains impatient about making regulatory changes to speed innovation in the globally-competitive drone industry. (REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo)

Baltimore —  Federal officials seeking to expand drone use around the United States said Tuesday they are pushing a pair of security initiatives to deal with what one called “the clueless, the careless and the criminal.”

Federal Aviation Administration officials said they want all, or nearly all, drones to have the electronic equivalent of a tail number that would allow them to be identified from afar. Such a requirement, dubbed “remote identification,” could help public safety authorities differentiate between potential threats and benign flights and make enforcement easier if people break the law, the officials said.

bTrump administration officials are also seeking legal changes to give the Department of Homeland Security and the Justice Department powers to track, disrupt or bring down drones that pose security dangers. That could mirror powers given to the Department of Defense in 2016 and expanded in 2017.

[ Drones keep entering no-fly zones over Washington, raising security concerns[1] ]

An FAA advisory group couldn’t agree last year on which classes of drones should be subject to a remote ID requirement. But FAA officials indicated at a joint government-drone industry conference in Baltimore on Tuesday that netting the societal benefits they see from sharply expanding drone use will only be possible if it is clear who is flying. Millions of the agile and affordable quadcopters and other such aircraft have already been sold in the United States.

“Anonymous operations in the system aren’t consistent with moving forward with integration and expansion of operations,” said Angela Stubblefield, the FAA’s deputy associate administrator for security and hazardous materials safety. Possible threats include using drones to attack or surveil targets, she said.

Acting FAA administrator Daniel K. Elwell said the intent is to establish the ID requirement “very quickly,” in an effort to minimize the risk that ignorance or ill intent could set back progress already being made to open up U.S. skies. The Trump administration has launched a drone integration pilot program to spur broad new uses of unmanned aircraft systems, or UAS, from product delivery to infrastructure inspection.

“One malicious act could put a hard stop on all the good work we’ve done on drone integration,”  Elwell said at the symposium put on by the FAA and industry group AUVSI.

Drones are covered by laws against computer hacking and wiretapping, complicating efforts to track users or take over their controls for security reasons. Yet changing laws protecting electronic communications could have civil liberties implications.

Michael Kratsios, deputy assistant to the president at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, said the federal government has limited authority to detect and defeat drone-based threats.

“The administration is working on a legislative proposal to enable certain agencies to use technology capable of detecting, and if necessary, mitigating UAS-based threats to certain sensitive facilities and assets,” Kratsios said, adding that officials will work with members of Congress, industry officials and others on the proposal in coming weeks and months.

Kratsios indicated that the White House remains impatient about making regulatory changes to speed innovation in the globally-competitive drone industry.

“We cannot allow the promise of tomorrow to be hamstrung by the bureaucracies of the past,” Kratsios said.

0

U.S. officials pushing for drone identification requirement, new …

Drones carry bags from the Dolce & Gabbana Autumn/Winter 2018 women’s collection during Milan Fashion Week in Italy in February. The White House remains impatient about making regulatory changes to speed innovation in the globally-competitive drone industry. (REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo)

Baltimore —  Federal officials seeking to expand drone use around the United States said Tuesday they are pushing a pair of security initiatives to deal with what one called “the clueless, the careless and the criminal.”

Federal Aviation Administration officials said they want all, or nearly all, drones to have the electronic equivalent of a tail number that would allow them to be identified from afar. Such a requirement, dubbed “remote identification,” could help public safety authorities differentiate between potential threats and benign flights and make enforcement easier if people break the law, the officials said.

bTrump administration officials are also seeking legal changes to give the Department of Homeland Security and the Justice Department powers to track, disrupt or bring down drones that pose security dangers. That could mirror powers given to the Department of Defense in 2016 and expanded in 2017.

[ Drones keep entering no-fly zones over Washington, raising security concerns[1] ]

An FAA advisory group couldn’t agree last year on which classes of drones should be subject to a remote ID requirement. But FAA officials indicated at a joint government-drone industry conference in Baltimore on Tuesday that netting the societal benefits they see from sharply expanding drone use will only be possible if it is clear who is flying. Millions of the agile and affordable quadcopters and other such aircraft have already been sold in the United States.

“Anonymous operations in the system aren’t consistent with moving forward with integration and expansion of operations,” said Angela Stubblefield, the FAA’s deputy associate administrator for security and hazardous materials safety. Possible threats include using drones to attack or surveil targets, she said.

Acting FAA administrator Daniel K. Elwell said the intent is to establish the ID requirement “very quickly,” in an effort to minimize the risk that ignorance or ill intent could set back progress already being made to open up U.S. skies. The Trump administration has launched a drone integration pilot program to spur broad new uses of unmanned aircraft systems, or UAS, from product delivery to infrastructure inspection.

“One malicious act could put a hard stop on all the good work we’ve done on drone integration,”  Elwell said at the symposium put on by the FAA and industry group AUVSI.

Drones are covered by laws against computer hacking and wiretapping, complicating efforts to track users or take over their controls for security reasons. Yet changing laws protecting electronic communications could have civil liberties implications.

Michael Kratsios, deputy assistant to the president at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, said the federal government has limited authority to detect and defeat drone-based threats.

“The administration is working on a legislative proposal to enable certain agencies to use technology capable of detecting, and if necessary, mitigating UAS-based threats to certain sensitive facilities and assets,” Kratsios said, adding that officials will work with members of Congress, industry officials and others on the proposal in coming weeks and months.

Kratsios indicated that the White House remains impatient about making regulatory changes to speed innovation in the globally-competitive drone industry.

“We cannot allow the promise of tomorrow to be hamstrung by the bureaucracies of the past,” Kratsios said.

0

US officials pushing for drone identification requirement, new powers for Homeland Security and Justice

Drones carry bags from the Dolce & Gabbana Autumn/Winter 2018 women’s collection during Milan Fashion Week in Italy in February. The White House remains impatient about making regulatory changes to speed innovation in the globally-competitive drone industry. (REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo)

Baltimore —  Federal officials seeking to expand drone use around the United States said Tuesday they are pushing a pair of security initiatives to deal with what one called “the clueless, the careless and the criminal.”

Federal Aviation Administration officials said they want all, or nearly all, drones to have the electronic equivalent of a tail number that would allow them to be identified from afar. Such a requirement, dubbed “remote identification,” could help public safety authorities differentiate between potential threats and benign flights and make enforcement easier if people break the law, the officials said.

Trump administration officials are also seeking legal changes to give the Department of Homeland Security and the Justice Department powers to track, disrupt or knock down drones that pose security dangers. That would mirror powers given to the Department of Defense in 2016 and expanded in 2017.

[ Drones keep entering no-fly zones over Washington, raising security concerns[1] ]

An FAA advisory group couldn’t agree last year on which classes of drones should be subject to a remote ID requirement. But FAA officials indicated at a joint government-drone industry conference in Baltimore on Tuesday that netting the societal benefits they see from sharply expanding drone use will only be possible if it is clear who is flying. Millions of the agile and affordable quadcopters and other such aircraft have already been sold in the United States.

“Anonymous operations in the system aren’t consistent with moving forward with integration and expansion of operations,” said Angela Stubblefield, the FAA’s deputy associate administrator for security and hazardous materials safety. Possible threats include using drones to attack or surveil targets, she said.

Acting FAA administrator Daniel K. Elwell said the intent is to establish the ID requirement “very quickly,” in an effort to minimize the risk that ignorance or ill intent could set back progress already being made to open up U.S. skies. The Trump administration has launched a drone integration pilot program to spur broad new uses of unmanned aircraft systems, or UAS, from product delivery to infrastructure inspection.

“One malicious act could put a hard stop on all the good work we’ve done on drone integration,”  Elwell said at the symposium put on by the FAA and industry group AUVSI.

Drones are covered by laws against computer hacking and wiretapping, complicating efforts to track users or take over their controls for security reasons. Yet changing laws protecting electronic communications could have civil liberties implications.

Michael Kratsios, deputy assistant to the president at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, said the federal government has limited authority to detect and defeat drone-based threats.

“The administration is working on a legislative proposal to enable certain agencies to use technology capable of detecting, and if necessary, mitigating UAS-based threats to certain sensitive facilities and assets,” Kratsios said, adding that officials will work with members of Congress, industry officials and others on the proposal in coming weeks and months.

Kratsios indicated that the White House remains impatient about making regulatory changes to speed innovation in the globally-competitive drone industry.

“We cannot allow the promise of tomorrow to be hamstrung by the bureaucracies of the past,” Kratsios said.

0

US officials pushing for drone identification requirement, new powers for Homeland Security and Justice

Drones carry bags from the Dolce & Gabbana Autumn/Winter 2018 women’s collection during Milan Fashion Week in Italy in February. The White House remains impatient about making regulatory changes to speed innovation in the globally-competitive drone industry. (REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo)

Baltimore —  Federal officials seeking to expand drone use around the United States said Tuesday they are pushing a pair of security initiatives to deal with what one called “the clueless, the careless and the criminal.”

Federal Aviation Administration officials said they want all, or nearly all, drones to have the electronic equivalent of a tail number that would allow them to be identified from afar. Such a requirement, dubbed “remote identification,” could help public safety authorities differentiate between potential threats and benign flights and make enforcement easier if people break the law, the officials said.

Trump administration officials are also seeking legal changes to give the Department of Homeland Security and the Justice Department powers to track, disrupt or knock down drones that pose security dangers. That would mirror powers given to the Department of Defense in 2016 and expanded in 2017.

[ Drones keep entering no-fly zones over Washington, raising security concerns[1] ]

An FAA advisory group couldn’t agree last year on which classes of drones should be subject to a remote ID requirement. But FAA officials indicated at a joint government-drone industry conference in Baltimore on Tuesday that netting the societal benefits they see from sharply expanding drone use will only be possible if it is clear who is flying. Millions of the agile and affordable quadcopters and other such aircraft have already been sold in the United States.

“Anonymous operations in the system aren’t consistent with moving forward with integration and expansion of operations,” said Angela Stubblefield, the FAA’s deputy associate administrator for security and hazardous materials safety. Possible threats include using drones to attack or surveil targets, she said.

Acting FAA administrator Daniel K. Elwell said the intent is to establish the ID requirement “very quickly,” in an effort to minimize the risk that ignorance or ill intent could set back progress already being made to open up U.S. skies. The Trump administration has launched a drone integration pilot program to spur broad new uses of unmanned aircraft systems, or UAS, from product delivery to infrastructure inspection.

“One malicious act could put a hard stop on all the good work we’ve done on drone integration,”  Elwell said at the symposium put on by the FAA and industry group AUVSI.

Drones are covered by laws against computer hacking and wiretapping, complicating efforts to track users or take over their controls for security reasons. Yet changing laws protecting electronic communications could have civil liberties implications.

Michael Kratsios, deputy assistant to the president at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, said the federal government has limited authority to detect and defeat drone-based threats.

“The administration is working on a legislative proposal to enable certain agencies to use technology capable of detecting, and if necessary, mitigating UAS-based threats to certain sensitive facilities and assets,” Kratsios said, adding that officials will work with members of Congress, industry officials and others on the proposal in coming weeks and months.

Kratsios indicated that the White House remains impatient about making regulatory changes to speed innovation in the globally-competitive drone industry.

“We cannot allow the promise of tomorrow to be hamstrung by the bureaucracies of the past,” Kratsios said.

0

US officials pushing for drone identification requirement, new powers for Homeland Security and Justice

Drones carry bags from the Dolce & Gabbana Autumn/Winter 2018 women’s collection during Milan Fashion Week in Italy in February. The White House remains impatient about making regulatory changes to speed innovation in the globally-competitive drone industry. (REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo)

Baltimore —  Federal officials seeking to expand drone use around the United States said Tuesday they are pushing a pair of security initiatives to deal with what one called “the clueless, the careless and the criminal.”

Federal Aviation Administration officials said they want all, or nearly all, drones to have the electronic equivalent of a tail number that would allow them to be identified from afar. Such a requirement, dubbed “remote identification,” could help public safety authorities differentiate between potential threats and benign flights and make enforcement easier if people break the law, the officials said.

Trump administration officials are also seeking legal changes to give the Department of Homeland Security and the Justice Department powers to track, disrupt or knock down drones that pose security dangers. That would mirror powers given to the Department of Defense in 2016 and expanded in 2017.

[ Drones keep entering no-fly zones over Washington, raising security concerns[1] ]

An FAA advisory group couldn’t agree last year on which classes of drones should be subject to a remote ID requirement. But FAA officials indicated at a joint government-drone industry conference in Baltimore on Tuesday that netting the societal benefits they see from sharply expanding drone use will only be possible if it is clear who is flying. Millions of the agile and affordable quadcopters and other such aircraft have already been sold in the United States.

“Anonymous operations in the system aren’t consistent with moving forward with integration and expansion of operations,” said Angela Stubblefield, the FAA’s deputy associate administrator for security and hazardous materials safety. Possible threats include using drones to attack or surveil targets, she said.

Acting FAA administrator Daniel K. Elwell said the intent is to establish the ID requirement “very quickly,” in an effort to minimize the risk that ignorance or ill intent could set back progress already being made to open up U.S. skies. The Trump administration has launched a drone integration pilot program to spur broad new uses of unmanned aircraft systems, or UAS, from product delivery to infrastructure inspection.

“One malicious act could put a hard stop on all the good work we’ve done on drone integration,”  Elwell said at the symposium put on by the FAA and industry group AUVSI.

Drones are covered by laws against computer hacking and wiretapping, complicating efforts to track users or take over their controls for security reasons. Yet changing laws protecting electronic communications could have civil liberties implications.

Michael Kratsios, deputy assistant to the president at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, said the federal government has limited authority to detect and defeat drone-based threats.

“The administration is working on a legislative proposal to enable certain agencies to use technology capable of detecting, and if necessary, mitigating UAS-based threats to certain sensitive facilities and assets,” Kratsios said, adding that officials will work with members of Congress, industry officials and others on the proposal in coming weeks and months.

Kratsios indicated that the White House remains impatient about making regulatory changes to speed innovation in the globally-competitive drone industry.

“We cannot allow the promise of tomorrow to be hamstrung by the bureaucracies of the past,” Kratsios said.