Tagged: support

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116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

Russia, Pakistan Form Anti-Terror Military Cooperation Commission

ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN — 

Russia and Pakistan plan to establish a commission on military cooperation to counter the Islamic State threat in the region, accusing the United States of downplaying the terrorist group’s dangerous “proliferation” in Afghanistan.

“We have confirmed Russia’s readiness to continue boosting Pakistan’s counterterrorism capacity, which is in the entire region’s interests,” Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Tuesday in Moscow.

Speaking to reporters along with his Pakistani counterpart, Khawaja Asif, the Russian official said fighting terrorism is one of the priority areas of cooperation between the two countries. He said joint military exercises between Russian and Pakistani special forces, which began in 2016, will continue this year.

FILE - A two-week-long joint exercise, DRUZBA 2017, between special forces of Pakistan and Russia armies is held in Minralney Vody, Russia.
FILE – A two-week-long joint exercise, DRUZBA 2017, between special forces of Pakistan and Russia armies is held in Minralney Vody, Russia.

Lavrov raised Moscow’s “very serious suspicions” about efforts the NATO-led coalition is undertaking in Afghanistan to curb the threat.

According to Russian and Pakistani data, he said, thousands of IS terrorists are present in northern and eastern Afghan border regions and they continue to grow in number. This is increasing the risk of the “terrorists’ penetration” into Central Asia and Russia.

Russian claims

“But we are alarmed because unfortunately, U.S. military and NATO coalition in Afghanistan try to silence or deny these facts to give an impression that it [IS] is not a serious threat,” noted Lavrov.

Russia and neighboring Iran are increasingly accusing the United States of being behind the rise of the Afghan branch of IS. They allege IS fighters fleeing Syria and Iraq are also finding refuge in the war-shattered country.

FILE - People protest against an Islamic State-claimed attack on a shrine earlier this year, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Feb. 17, 2017.
FILE – People protest against an Islamic State-claimed attack on a shrine earlier this year, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Feb. 17, 2017.

Lavrov said Moscow is also waiting for “clarifications” from the U.S.-led coalition about “flights of unmarked helicopters” to Afghan areas that are either controlled by insurgents or host militant bases.

Pakistani Foreign Minister Asif shared Lavrov’s concerns about what he said is “unchecked proliferation of Daesh” in Afghanistan.

“But there is absolutely no acknowledgment, real acknowledgement, by Kabul and Washington of such a large presence of Daesh or the proliferation of Daesh in Afghanistan. … They are a threat to Central Asia, Pakistan, China and ultimately to Russian Federation. … So, this is something, which is very alarming,” he said, using the Arabic acronym for IS.

The number of IS terrorists, Asif said, has surpassed even some Taliban groups operating in Afghanistan because of the arrival of militants from the Middle East.

Washington vehemently rejects as “rumors” charges that it is supporting IS activities in Afghanistan, and maintains that sustained military operations in partnership with Afghan forces against the terrorist group have significantly degraded and reduced the terrorists in the country.

U.S. officials, in turn, denounce Moscow’s overt ties with the Taliban, saying it gives legitimacy to the insurgency and undermines years of efforts to stabilize Afghanistan.

Afghan peace pledge

Lavrov and Asif also pledged to work closely to promote a peace and reconciliation process in Afghanistan, alleging the U.S.-led military mission has failed to secure the country. They said illegal opium poppy production, which is directly feeding insecurity, has also increased “manyfold.”

“There are monumental failures in Afghanistan and there is an effort to scapegoat Pakistan … for these failures. We have rejected these baseless allegations. We cannot fight others’ wars on our soil,” said Asif.

FILE - Pakistani protesters burn posters of U.S. President Donald Trump in Lahore, Pakistan, Jan. 5, 2018. Pakistan has expressed disappointment at the U.S. decision to suspend military aid to Islamabad.
FILE – Pakistani protesters burn posters of U.S. President Donald Trump in Lahore, Pakistan, Jan. 5, 2018. Pakistan has expressed disappointment at the U.S. decision to suspend military aid to Islamabad.

He was referring to the Trump administration’s accusations the Taliban and its allies are waging insurgency in Afghanistan from their sanctuaries in Pakistan and with covert support of its military. U.S. and Afghan officials have been demanding that Islamabad take “decisive” action against the militants.

Pakistani officials deny any links to insurgents and say security forces have uprooted all terrorist bases. They, in turn, allege militants who have fled counterterrorism operations have found refuge on the Afghan side of the long, porous border between the two countries and plot terrorist attacks against Pakistan.

Washington has suspended military aid to Pakistan and relations continue to deteriorate as U.S. officials maintain there is no evidence the country is taking action against insurgents on its soil, including those linked to the dreaded Haqqani network.

Pakistan’s closeness with Russia and the cementing of traditionally strong ties with neighboring China stem from the growing U.S. pressure, say analysts.

0

Russia, Pakistan Form Anti-Terror Military Cooperation Commission

ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN — 

Russia and Pakistan plan to establish a commission on military cooperation to counter the Islamic State threat in the region, accusing the United States of downplaying the terrorist group’s dangerous “proliferation” in Afghanistan.

“We have confirmed Russia’s readiness to continue boosting Pakistan’s counterterrorism capacity, which is in the entire region’s interests,” Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Tuesday in Moscow.

Speaking to reporters along with his Pakistani counterpart, Khawaja Asif, the Russian official said fighting terrorism is one of the priority areas of cooperation between the two countries. He said joint military exercises between Russian and Pakistani special forces, which began in 2016, will continue this year.

FILE - A two-week-long joint exercise, DRUZBA 2017, between special forces of Pakistan and Russia armies is held in Minralney Vody, Russia.
FILE – A two-week-long joint exercise, DRUZBA 2017, between special forces of Pakistan and Russia armies is held in Minralney Vody, Russia.

Lavrov raised Moscow’s “very serious suspicions” about efforts the NATO-led coalition is undertaking in Afghanistan to curb the threat.

According to Russian and Pakistani data, he said, thousands of IS terrorists are present in northern and eastern Afghan border regions and they continue to grow in number. This is increasing the risk of the “terrorists’ penetration” into Central Asia and Russia.

Russian claims

“But we are alarmed because unfortunately, U.S. military and NATO coalition in Afghanistan try to silence or deny these facts to give an impression that it [IS] is not a serious threat,” noted Lavrov.

Russia and neighboring Iran are increasingly accusing the United States of being behind the rise of the Afghan branch of IS. They allege IS fighters fleeing Syria and Iraq are also finding refuge in the war-shattered country.

FILE - People protest against an Islamic State-claimed attack on a shrine earlier this year, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Feb. 17, 2017.
FILE – People protest against an Islamic State-claimed attack on a shrine earlier this year, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Feb. 17, 2017.

Lavrov said Moscow is also waiting for “clarifications” from the U.S.-led coalition about “flights of unmarked helicopters” to Afghan areas that are either controlled by insurgents or host militant bases.

Pakistani Foreign Minister Asif shared Lavrov’s concerns about what he said is “unchecked proliferation of Daesh” in Afghanistan.

“But there is absolutely no acknowledgment, real acknowledgement, by Kabul and Washington of such a large presence of Daesh or the proliferation of Daesh in Afghanistan. … They are a threat to Central Asia, Pakistan, China and ultimately to Russian Federation. … So, this is something, which is very alarming,” he said, using the Arabic acronym for IS.

The number of IS terrorists, Asif said, has surpassed even some Taliban groups operating in Afghanistan because of the arrival of militants from the Middle East.

Washington vehemently rejects as “rumors” charges that it is supporting IS activities in Afghanistan, and maintains that sustained military operations in partnership with Afghan forces against the terrorist group have significantly degraded and reduced the terrorists in the country.

U.S. officials, in turn, denounce Moscow’s overt ties with the Taliban, saying it gives legitimacy to the insurgency and undermines years of efforts to stabilize Afghanistan.

Afghan peace pledge

Lavrov and Asif also pledged to work closely to promote a peace and reconciliation process in Afghanistan, alleging the U.S.-led military mission has failed to secure the country. They said illegal opium poppy production, which is directly feeding insecurity, has also increased “manyfold.”

“There are monumental failures in Afghanistan and there is an effort to scapegoat Pakistan … for these failures. We have rejected these baseless allegations. We cannot fight others’ wars on our soil,” said Asif.

FILE - Pakistani protesters burn posters of U.S. President Donald Trump in Lahore, Pakistan, Jan. 5, 2018. Pakistan has expressed disappointment at the U.S. decision to suspend military aid to Islamabad.
FILE – Pakistani protesters burn posters of U.S. President Donald Trump in Lahore, Pakistan, Jan. 5, 2018. Pakistan has expressed disappointment at the U.S. decision to suspend military aid to Islamabad.

He was referring to the Trump administration’s accusations the Taliban and its allies are waging insurgency in Afghanistan from their sanctuaries in Pakistan and with covert support of its military. U.S. and Afghan officials have been demanding that Islamabad take “decisive” action against the militants.

Pakistani officials deny any links to insurgents and say security forces have uprooted all terrorist bases. They, in turn, allege militants who have fled counterterrorism operations have found refuge on the Afghan side of the long, porous border between the two countries and plot terrorist attacks against Pakistan.

Washington has suspended military aid to Pakistan and relations continue to deteriorate as U.S. officials maintain there is no evidence the country is taking action against insurgents on its soil, including those linked to the dreaded Haqqani network.

Pakistan’s closeness with Russia and the cementing of traditionally strong ties with neighboring China stem from the growing U.S. pressure, say analysts.

0

Russia, Pakistan Form Anti-Terror Military Cooperation Commission

ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN — 

Russia and Pakistan plan to establish a commission on military cooperation to counter the Islamic State threat in the region, accusing the United States of downplaying the terrorist group’s dangerous “proliferation” in Afghanistan.

“We have confirmed Russia’s readiness to continue boosting Pakistan’s counterterrorism capacity, which is in the entire region’s interests,” Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Tuesday in Moscow.

Speaking to reporters along with his Pakistani counterpart, Khawaja Asif, the Russian official said fighting terrorism is one of the priority areas of cooperation between the two countries. He said joint military exercises between Russian and Pakistani special forces, which began in 2016, will continue this year.

FILE - A two-week-long joint exercise, DRUZBA 2017, between special forces of Pakistan and Russia armies is held in Minralney Vody, Russia.
FILE – A two-week-long joint exercise, DRUZBA 2017, between special forces of Pakistan and Russia armies is held in Minralney Vody, Russia.

Lavrov raised Moscow’s “very serious suspicions” about efforts the NATO-led coalition is undertaking in Afghanistan to curb the threat.

According to Russian and Pakistani data, he said, thousands of IS terrorists are present in northern and eastern Afghan border regions and they continue to grow in number. This is increasing the risk of the “terrorists’ penetration” into Central Asia and Russia.

Russian claims

“But we are alarmed because unfortunately, U.S. military and NATO coalition in Afghanistan try to silence or deny these facts to give an impression that it [IS] is not a serious threat,” noted Lavrov.

Russia and neighboring Iran are increasingly accusing the United States of being behind the rise of the Afghan branch of IS. They allege IS fighters fleeing Syria and Iraq are also finding refuge in the war-shattered country.

FILE - People protest against an Islamic State-claimed attack on a shrine earlier this year, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Feb. 17, 2017.
FILE – People protest against an Islamic State-claimed attack on a shrine earlier this year, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Feb. 17, 2017.

Lavrov said Moscow is also waiting for “clarifications” from the U.S.-led coalition about “flights of unmarked helicopters” to Afghan areas that are either controlled by insurgents or host militant bases.

Pakistani Foreign Minister Asif shared Lavrov’s concerns about what he said is “unchecked proliferation of Daesh” in Afghanistan.

“But there is absolutely no acknowledgment, real acknowledgement, by Kabul and Washington of such a large presence of Daesh or the proliferation of Daesh in Afghanistan. … They are a threat to Central Asia, Pakistan, China and ultimately to Russian Federation. … So, this is something, which is very alarming,” he said, using the Arabic acronym for IS.

The number of IS terrorists, Asif said, has surpassed even some Taliban groups operating in Afghanistan because of the arrival of militants from the Middle East.

Washington vehemently rejects as “rumors” charges that it is supporting IS activities in Afghanistan, and maintains that sustained military operations in partnership with Afghan forces against the terrorist group have significantly degraded and reduced the terrorists in the country.

U.S. officials, in turn, denounce Moscow’s overt ties with the Taliban, saying it gives legitimacy to the insurgency and undermines years of efforts to stabilize Afghanistan.

Afghan peace pledge

Lavrov and Asif also pledged to work closely to promote a peace and reconciliation process in Afghanistan, alleging the U.S.-led military mission has failed to secure the country. They said illegal opium poppy production, which is directly feeding insecurity, has also increased “manyfold.”

“There are monumental failures in Afghanistan and there is an effort to scapegoat Pakistan … for these failures. We have rejected these baseless allegations. We cannot fight others’ wars on our soil,” said Asif.

FILE - Pakistani protesters burn posters of U.S. President Donald Trump in Lahore, Pakistan, Jan. 5, 2018. Pakistan has expressed disappointment at the U.S. decision to suspend military aid to Islamabad.
FILE – Pakistani protesters burn posters of U.S. President Donald Trump in Lahore, Pakistan, Jan. 5, 2018. Pakistan has expressed disappointment at the U.S. decision to suspend military aid to Islamabad.

He was referring to the Trump administration’s accusations the Taliban and its allies are waging insurgency in Afghanistan from their sanctuaries in Pakistan and with covert support of its military. U.S. and Afghan officials have been demanding that Islamabad take “decisive” action against the militants.

Pakistani officials deny any links to insurgents and say security forces have uprooted all terrorist bases. They, in turn, allege militants who have fled counterterrorism operations have found refuge on the Afghan side of the long, porous border between the two countries and plot terrorist attacks against Pakistan.

Washington has suspended military aid to Pakistan and relations continue to deteriorate as U.S. officials maintain there is no evidence the country is taking action against insurgents on its soil, including those linked to the dreaded Haqqani network.

Pakistan’s closeness with Russia and the cementing of traditionally strong ties with neighboring China stem from the growing U.S. pressure, say analysts.

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Homeland Security chief touts effort on election cybersecurity

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenMcConnell: ‘Whoever gets to 60 wins’ on immigration Overnight Tech: Senators want probe of company selling fake Twitter followers | Google parent made over 0B in 2017 | House chair threatens to subpoena DHS over Kaspersky Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump poised to allow release of intel memo | GOP chair threatens to subpoena DHS over Kaspersky docs | Pompeo defends meeting Russian spy chief MORE[2][3][4][5][6][1] on Tuesday touted the department’s effort to engage with state and local officials on guarding U.S. voting infrastructure from cyber threats, stressing that public trust in vote counts “relies on secure election infrastructure.”

Nielsen issued the statement highlighting the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) recent meetings with state and local election officials, which included classified briefings from U.S. intelligence officials on cyber threats to U.S. voting infrastructure. 

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“The American public’s confidence that their vote counts — and is counted correctly — relies on secure election infrastructure,” Nielsen said Tuesday. “The first primaries of the 2018 midterm election cycle are just around the corner, and DHS and our federal, state and local partners have been working together for more than a year to bolster the cybersecurity of the nation’s election infrastructure.”

The meetings are part of Homeland Security’s new effort to engage with stakeholders on the security of U.S. voting infrastructure.

The department under the Obama administration designated voting data systems and other election infrastructure as “critical” following Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, offering up federal assistance to states that request it.

Moscow’s multipronged interference effort has underscored fears of foreign threats to voter databases and other systems used to conduct elections after officials revealed that Russian hackers targeted digital systems in 21 states before the 2016 vote. 

Homeland Security has maintained that none of the systems were involved in vote tallying and that most of the targeting efforts were not successful. Officials continue to emphasize that there is no evidence any vote tallies were tampered with.

The meetings took place over several days late last week and involved representatives from Homeland Security, the U.S. Election Assistance Commission, the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS), and the National Association of State Election Directors, according to the department.

As part of the meetings, Homeland Security and officials with the Office of Director of National Intelligence and the FBI gave state officials a classified briefing on foreign threats to U.S. election infrastructure. 

According to The New York Times[7], some state officials were disappointed by the classified briefing on Friday because it did not offer clear information about the Russia threat.  

Nielsen said she met privately with leaders of the NASS, which represents state secretaries across the country who serve as their states’ chief election officials. 

“I thanked them for their partnership and pledged the Department will continue its support to state and local election officials, primarily through sharing timely and actionable threat information and offering cybersecurity services,” Nielsen said.

The critical infrastructure designation has at times been a source of tension between federal and state election officials. State officials have complained that they have not received timely threat information and face long waits for security clearances in order to receive classified briefings. 

Homeland Security officials have pledged that they are working to more quickly provide clearances to state officials and offer timely cybersecurity assistance to states that ask for it, such as rigorous risk and vulnerability assessments of their systems.