Tagged: start

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82nd Airborne hosts first electronic warfare competition

Drew Brooks Military editor @DrewBrooks

Sgt. 1st Class Mike Sanders and Sgt. Sam Odior stood just outside a cluster of pine trees and stared at a small screen.

Sanders pressed an icon on the screen as Odior glanced up at the antenna protruding from a pack on the other soldier’s back.

“I think I’ve got something,” Sanders said as Odior leaned forward to get a better look.

“We’ve got a possible hit on the freq,” the paratrooper repeated, this time into a radio, signalling three other soldiers nearby.

In a wooded training area on Fort Bragg, the team of soldiers from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division were involved in a complicated game of hide and seek.

Using an electronic warfare system known as the VMAX, paratroopers from across the 82nd Airborne Division were competing to find a series of waypoints. Using the VMAX, the soldiers scanned for a signal frequency and then honed in on its source.

The navigational test was the first event in the 82nd Airborne Division’s inaugural Electronic Warfare Competition.

Lt. Col. Robert A. Robinson II, the division’s cyber electromagnetic activities, or CEMA, chief and the officer in charge of the competition, said the event was designed to showcase skills that are becoming more and more important on the modern battlefield.

Electronic warfare is used to jam enemy signals, defeat unmanned aerial systems and disable improvised explosive devices.

Robinson said teams received an alert with a location grid early Monday.

“They knew the competition was going to start, but they didn’t know where,” he said. “We’re trying to stick to the traditions of the division: to be ready any time, any where.”

The three-day competition will include several classroom tests, but it began in the field.

Capt. Brian Mercado of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team said the navigation test was forcing the soldiers to use their electronic warfare systems in ways they haven’t before.

In past training, Mercado said, soldiers used the VMAX systems defensively on drop zones to protect paratroopers from enemy systems. But the navigational test showed that the systems also could be used to pinpoint an enemy force.

“This goes beyond our typical training,” Mercado said.

The system is the size of a large backpack with large antennas protruding overhead and can be jumped with a paratrooper. The lightweight system can detect, locate, monitor and jam radio frequency signals.

Each brigade combat team in the division has a CEMA cell. And each sent at least one team to compete, Robinson said. Each must be able to plan, troubleshoot and execute missions as they are provided.

“It’s a great opportunity,” he said. “Electronic warfare is a big part of the future and this is the tactical-level support we provide.”

Military editor Drew Brooks can be reached at [email protected] or 486-3567.

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82nd Airborne hosts first electronic warfare competition

Drew Brooks Military editor @DrewBrooks

Sgt. 1st Class Mike Sanders and Sgt. Sam Odior stood just outside a cluster of pine trees and stared at a small screen.

Sanders pressed an icon on the screen as Odior glanced up at the antenna protruding from a pack on the other soldier’s back.

“I think I’ve got something,” Sanders said as Odior leaned forward to get a better look.

“We’ve got a possible hit on the freq,” the paratrooper repeated, this time into a radio, signalling three other soldiers nearby.

In a wooded training area on Fort Bragg, the team of soldiers from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division were involved in a complicated game of hide and seek.

Using an electronic warfare system known as the VMAX, paratroopers from across the 82nd Airborne Division were competing to find a series of waypoints. Using the VMAX, the soldiers scanned for a signal frequency and then honed in on its source.

The navigational test was the first event in the 82nd Airborne Division’s inaugural Electronic Warfare Competition.

Lt. Col. Robert A. Robinson II, the division’s cyber electromagnetic activities, or CEMA, chief and the officer in charge of the competition, said the event was designed to showcase skills that are becoming more and more important on the modern battlefield.

Electronic warfare is used to jam enemy signals, defeat unmanned aerial systems and disable improvised explosive devices.

Robinson said teams received an alert with a location grid early Monday.

“They knew the competition was going to start, but they didn’t know where,” he said. “We’re trying to stick to the traditions of the division: to be ready any time, any where.”

The three-day competition will include several classroom tests, but it began in the field.

Capt. Brian Mercado of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team said the navigation test was forcing the soldiers to use their electronic warfare systems in ways they haven’t before.

In past training, Mercado said, soldiers used the VMAX systems defensively on drop zones to protect paratroopers from enemy systems. But the navigational test showed that the systems also could be used to pinpoint an enemy force.

“This goes beyond our typical training,” Mercado said.

The system is the size of a large backpack with large antennas protruding overhead and can be jumped with a paratrooper. The lightweight system can detect, locate, monitor and jam radio frequency signals.

Each brigade combat team in the division has a CEMA cell. And each sent at least one team to compete, Robinson said. Each must be able to plan, troubleshoot and execute missions as they are provided.

“It’s a great opportunity,” he said. “Electronic warfare is a big part of the future and this is the tactical-level support we provide.”

Military editor Drew Brooks can be reached at [email protected] or 486-3567.

0

82nd Airborne hosts first electronic warfare competition

Drew Brooks Military editor @DrewBrooks

Sgt. 1st Class Mike Sanders and Sgt. Sam Odior stood just outside a cluster of pine trees and stared at a small screen.

Sanders pressed an icon on the screen as Odior glanced up at the antenna protruding from a pack on the other soldier’s back.

“I think I’ve got something,” Sanders said as Odior leaned forward to get a better look.

“We’ve got a possible hit on the freq,” the paratrooper repeated, this time into a radio, signalling three other soldiers nearby.

In a wooded training area on Fort Bragg, the team of soldiers from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division were involved in a complicated game of hide and seek.

Using an electronic warfare system known as the VMAX, paratroopers from across the 82nd Airborne Division were competing to find a series of waypoints. Using the VMAX, the soldiers scanned for a signal frequency and then honed in on its source.

The navigational test was the first event in the 82nd Airborne Division’s inaugural Electronic Warfare Competition.

Lt. Col. Robert A. Robinson II, the division’s cyber electromagnetic activities, or CEMA, chief and the officer in charge of the competition, said the event was designed to showcase skills that are becoming more and more important on the modern battlefield.

Electronic warfare is used to jam enemy signals, defeat unmanned aerial systems and disable improvised explosive devices.

Robinson said teams received an alert with a location grid early Monday.

“They knew the competition was going to start, but they didn’t know where,” he said. “We’re trying to stick to the traditions of the division: to be ready any time, any where.”

The three-day competition will include several classroom tests, but it began in the field.

Capt. Brian Mercado of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team said the navigation test was forcing the soldiers to use their electronic warfare systems in ways they haven’t before.

In past training, Mercado said, soldiers used the VMAX systems defensively on drop zones to protect paratroopers from enemy systems. But the navigational test showed that the systems also could be used to pinpoint an enemy force.

“This goes beyond our typical training,” Mercado said.

The system is the size of a large backpack with large antennas protruding overhead and can be jumped with a paratrooper. The lightweight system can detect, locate, monitor and jam radio frequency signals.

Each brigade combat team in the division has a CEMA cell. And each sent at least one team to compete, Robinson said. Each must be able to plan, troubleshoot and execute missions as they are provided.

“It’s a great opportunity,” he said. “Electronic warfare is a big part of the future and this is the tactical-level support we provide.”

Military editor Drew Brooks can be reached at [email protected] or 486-3567.

0

Talks with North Korea won't stop annual US-South Korea military exercises

In a turnaround, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has said to President Donald Trump that the rogue nation will not carry out nuclear and missile tests during the two months that the U.S. and South Korea will conduct their annual large-scale military exercises on the Korean peninsula. In the past, the exercises have often drawn North Korea’s ire and prompted provocative North Korean missile and nuclear tests.

South Korean National Security Advisor Chung Eui-yong announced at the White House Thursday night that the president had accepted to meet with Kim Jong Un by May. Chung also briefed Trump that in his meeting this weekend with Kim, the North Korean leader “pledged that North Korea will refrain from any further nuclear or missile tests.”

And he added that Kim “understands that the routine joint military exercises between the Republic of Korea and the United States must continue.”

The U.S. and South Korea postponed this year’s annual “Foal Eagle” and “Key Resolve” exercises until after the Winter Olympics[1] and Paralympic Games[2] being held in South Korea. The exercises typically involve additional air, sea and ground forces beyond the 28,500 American troops[3] regularly deployed to South Korea.

“The focus during this time is the security and success of the Olympics,” said Lt. Colonel Christopher Logan, a Defense Department spokesman. “We will release additional information about future exercises after the Olympics.”

The Paralympic Games end on March 18, but the Pentagon[4] has not officially announced a start date for both exercises that are typically held every March and April.

According to a U.S. official, though, the Foal Eagle exercise will begin on March 31 and last for two months. The Key Resolve exercise will begin in mid-April and extend through the first week in May, the official said.

During Foal Eagle, large numbers of U.S. and South Korean military personnel carry out realistic training scenarios throughout South Korea. But Key Resolve involves only headquarters units reacting to computer simulations.

North Korea has often condemned the Foal Eagle exercise and used it as an excuse for its provocative missile and nuclear tests.

“North Korea objects to Foal Eagle because it involves U.S. troops coming to South Korea, and participating in realistic joint training, said Steve Ganyard, ABC News contributor. “It directly counteracts North Korean propaganda and points out the strength of the U.S. and South Korean military alliance.”

But North Korean leader Kim Jong Un[5] may have softened that stance with his recent overture for denuclearization talks with the United States.

South Korean officials who met with Kim this past weekend said he told them he understood why South Korea holds the exercises and said they would be hard to cancel anyway.

“If Kim sticks to his playbook, ceasing field exercises like Foal Eagle will be among the first North Korean demands,” said Ganyard. “He sees it as a way to weaken the South’s military defense and thereby divide the alliance.”

Ganyard said the first test of the strength of the U.S.-South Korean alliance will be if Kim’s demand gains popular support in South Korea while the U.S. would probably want to see North Korea make concrete proposals, particularly about doing away with its nuclear weapons program[6].

Traveling in Ethiopia, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson[7] tempered expectations about North Korea’s offer of talks with the United States, noting it’s still too soon to tell if they are possible.

Prior to Chung’s dramatic announcement at the White House, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson had tempered expectations about possible talks with North Korea.

While he acknowledged discussions about talks are “potentially positive signs,” Tillerson cautioned, “we’re a long way from negotiations.”

“We just need to be very clear-eyed and realistic about it,” said Tillerson. “I think the first step, and I’ve said this before is to have talks, to have some kind of talks about talks because I don’t know yet until we are able to meet ourselves face to face with representatives of North Korea whether the conditions are right to even begin thinking about negotiations.”

Senior Korean officials arrived in Washington on Thursday to brief top U.S. officials with the specifics of Kim’s proposals for possible talks.

References

  1. ^ Winter Olympics (abcnews.go.com)
  2. ^ Paralympic Games (abcnews.go.com)
  3. ^ American troops (abcnews.go.com)
  4. ^ the Pentagon (abcnews.go.com)
  5. ^ Kim Jong Un (abcnews.go.com)
  6. ^ weapons program (abcnews.go.com)
  7. ^ Rex Tillerson (abcnews.go.com)
0

Talks with North Korea won't stop annual US-South Korea military exercises

In a turnaround, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has said to President Donald Trump that the rogue nation will not carry out nuclear and missile tests during the two months that the U.S. and South Korea will conduct their annual large-scale military exercises on the Korean peninsula. In the past, the exercises have often drawn North Korea’s ire and prompted provocative North Korean missile and nuclear tests.

South Korean National Security Advisor Chung Eui-yong announced at the White House Thursday night that the president had accepted to meet with Kim Jong Un by May. Chung also briefed Trump that in his meeting this weekend with Kim, the North Korean leader “pledged that North Korea will refrain from any further nuclear or missile tests.”

And he added that Kim “understands that the routine joint military exercises between the Republic of Korea and the United States must continue.”

The U.S. and South Korea postponed this year’s annual “Foal Eagle” and “Key Resolve” exercises until after the Winter Olympics[1] and Paralympic Games[2] being held in South Korea. The exercises typically involve additional air, sea and ground forces beyond the 28,500 American troops[3] regularly deployed to South Korea.

“The focus during this time is the security and success of the Olympics,” said Lt. Colonel Christopher Logan, a Defense Department spokesman. “We will release additional information about future exercises after the Olympics.”

The Paralympic Games end on March 18, but the Pentagon[4] has not officially announced a start date for both exercises that are typically held every March and April.

According to a U.S. official, though, the Foal Eagle exercise will begin on March 31 and last for two months. The Key Resolve exercise will begin in mid-April and extend through the first week in May, the official said.

During Foal Eagle, large numbers of U.S. and South Korean military personnel carry out realistic training scenarios throughout South Korea. But Key Resolve involves only headquarters units reacting to computer simulations.

North Korea has often condemned the Foal Eagle exercise and used it as an excuse for its provocative missile and nuclear tests.

“North Korea objects to Foal Eagle because it involves U.S. troops coming to South Korea, and participating in realistic joint training, said Steve Ganyard, ABC News contributor. “It directly counteracts North Korean propaganda and points out the strength of the U.S. and South Korean military alliance.”

But North Korean leader Kim Jong Un[5] may have softened that stance with his recent overture for denuclearization talks with the United States.

South Korean officials who met with Kim this past weekend said he told them he understood why South Korea holds the exercises and said they would be hard to cancel anyway.

“If Kim sticks to his playbook, ceasing field exercises like Foal Eagle will be among the first North Korean demands,” said Ganyard. “He sees it as a way to weaken the South’s military defense and thereby divide the alliance.”

Ganyard said the first test of the strength of the U.S.-South Korean alliance will be if Kim’s demand gains popular support in South Korea while the U.S. would probably want to see North Korea make concrete proposals, particularly about doing away with its nuclear weapons program[6].

Traveling in Ethiopia, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson[7] tempered expectations about North Korea’s offer of talks with the United States, noting it’s still too soon to tell if they are possible.

Prior to Chung’s dramatic announcement at the White House, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson had tempered expectations about possible talks with North Korea.

While he acknowledged discussions about talks are “potentially positive signs,” Tillerson cautioned, “we’re a long way from negotiations.”

“We just need to be very clear-eyed and realistic about it,” said Tillerson. “I think the first step, and I’ve said this before is to have talks, to have some kind of talks about talks because I don’t know yet until we are able to meet ourselves face to face with representatives of North Korea whether the conditions are right to even begin thinking about negotiations.”

Senior Korean officials arrived in Washington on Thursday to brief top U.S. officials with the specifics of Kim’s proposals for possible talks.

References

  1. ^ Winter Olympics (abcnews.go.com)
  2. ^ Paralympic Games (abcnews.go.com)
  3. ^ American troops (abcnews.go.com)
  4. ^ the Pentagon (abcnews.go.com)
  5. ^ Kim Jong Un (abcnews.go.com)
  6. ^ weapons program (abcnews.go.com)
  7. ^ Rex Tillerson (abcnews.go.com)
0

Talks with North Korea won't stop annual US-South Korea military exercises

In a turnaround, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has said to President Donald Trump that the rogue nation will not carry out nuclear and missile tests during the two months that the U.S. and South Korea will conduct their annual large-scale military exercises on the Korean peninsula. In the past, the exercises have often drawn North Korea’s ire and prompted provocative North Korean missile and nuclear tests.

South Korean National Security Advisor Chung Eui-yong announced at the White House Thursday night that the president had accepted to meet with Kim Jong Un by May. Chung also briefed Trump that in his meeting this weekend with Kim, the North Korean leader “pledged that North Korea will refrain from any further nuclear or missile tests.”

And he added that Kim “understands that the routine joint military exercises between the Republic of Korea and the United States must continue.”

The U.S. and South Korea postponed this year’s annual “Foal Eagle” and “Key Resolve” exercises until after the Winter Olympics[1] and Paralympic Games[2] being held in South Korea. The exercises typically involve additional air, sea and ground forces beyond the 28,500 American troops[3] regularly deployed to South Korea.

“The focus during this time is the security and success of the Olympics,” said Lt. Colonel Christopher Logan, a Defense Department spokesman. “We will release additional information about future exercises after the Olympics.”

The Paralympic Games end on March 18, but the Pentagon[4] has not officially announced a start date for both exercises that are typically held every March and April.

According to a U.S. official, though, the Foal Eagle exercise will begin on March 31 and last for two months. The Key Resolve exercise will begin in mid-April and extend through the first week in May, the official said.

During Foal Eagle, large numbers of U.S. and South Korean military personnel carry out realistic training scenarios throughout South Korea. But Key Resolve involves only headquarters units reacting to computer simulations.

North Korea has often condemned the Foal Eagle exercise and used it as an excuse for its provocative missile and nuclear tests.

“North Korea objects to Foal Eagle because it involves U.S. troops coming to South Korea, and participating in realistic joint training, said Steve Ganyard, ABC News contributor. “It directly counteracts North Korean propaganda and points out the strength of the U.S. and South Korean military alliance.”

But North Korean leader Kim Jong Un[5] may have softened that stance with his recent overture for denuclearization talks with the United States.

South Korean officials who met with Kim this past weekend said he told them he understood why South Korea holds the exercises and said they would be hard to cancel anyway.

“If Kim sticks to his playbook, ceasing field exercises like Foal Eagle will be among the first North Korean demands,” said Ganyard. “He sees it as a way to weaken the South’s military defense and thereby divide the alliance.”

Ganyard said the first test of the strength of the U.S.-South Korean alliance will be if Kim’s demand gains popular support in South Korea while the U.S. would probably want to see North Korea make concrete proposals, particularly about doing away with its nuclear weapons program[6].

Traveling in Ethiopia, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson[7] tempered expectations about North Korea’s offer of talks with the United States, noting it’s still too soon to tell if they are possible.

Prior to Chung’s dramatic announcement at the White House, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson had tempered expectations about possible talks with North Korea.

While he acknowledged discussions about talks are “potentially positive signs,” Tillerson cautioned, “we’re a long way from negotiations.”

“We just need to be very clear-eyed and realistic about it,” said Tillerson. “I think the first step, and I’ve said this before is to have talks, to have some kind of talks about talks because I don’t know yet until we are able to meet ourselves face to face with representatives of North Korea whether the conditions are right to even begin thinking about negotiations.”

Senior Korean officials arrived in Washington on Thursday to brief top U.S. officials with the specifics of Kim’s proposals for possible talks.

References

  1. ^ Winter Olympics (abcnews.go.com)
  2. ^ Paralympic Games (abcnews.go.com)
  3. ^ American troops (abcnews.go.com)
  4. ^ the Pentagon (abcnews.go.com)
  5. ^ Kim Jong Un (abcnews.go.com)
  6. ^ weapons program (abcnews.go.com)
  7. ^ Rex Tillerson (abcnews.go.com)
0

Burkina Faso President Urges Public to Cooperate With Military After Twin Attacks

Burkina Faso President Roch Kabore urged the public Saturday to cooperate more closely with the country’s military, one day after an armed group carried out coordinated attacks on France’s embassy and cultural center and on the West African country’s military headquarters in the capital of Ouagadougou.

“I would like to encourage the population to reinforce collaboration with our defense and security forces in our common fight against terrorism,” he said in a speech on national television.

The Group to Support Islam and Muslims (GSIM) — also known as Jama’a Nusrat ul-Islam wa’al- Muslimin (JNIM) in Arabic — on Saturday claimed responsibility for the attacks in a message cited by Mauritania’s Al-Akhbar news agency.

The group, a fusion of three Malian jihadist groups with previous al-Qaida links, have been behind several high-profile attacks against civilian and military forces since forming last year.

The government said eight soldiers were killed, as well as eight assailants — four at the embassy and four at military headquarters. Eighty others were wounded.

At the start of the Friday attacks, witnesses said, armed men got out of a car and opened fire on passers-by before heading to the embassy. An explosion occurred at about the same time near the military headquarters and the French cultural center about a kilometer from the embassy attack, witnesses said.

Aristide Voundi, a milkman who was near the army headquarters when the attack occurred, told VOA, “I heard a loud noise in that area, and I saw black smoke. My ears were buzzing. I got scared. I took off, and I saw people running. It was panic in the city.”

Homemaker Sanou Safiatou said she was in the city when she heard an explosion, which triggered a scramble for shelter. “We were really afraid,” and “the traffic was dense,” she said. “It was chaos.”

A prosecutor in Paris said an investigation had been launched into “attempted murder in relation to a terrorist enterprise.”

The city has been attacked at least twice in the past few years by Islamic extremists targeting foreigners.

Burkina Faso is among a number of vulnerable countries in the southern Sahara region that are fighting jihadist groups.

VOA French to Africa service’s Bagassi Koura contributed to this report.