Tagged: soldier

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Israeli military investigating Palestinian's death in West Bank confrontation

JERUSALEM (Reuters) – A Palestinian man died after a confrontation with Israeli troops in the occupied West Bank on Thursday that the Palestinian Authority condemned as a “cold-blooded execution”.

The Israeli military said the man had attempted to attack troops and that it was investigating the incident.

In security camera footage posted on social media and carried by Israeli news sites, soldiers could be seen kicking and striking a man, identified by Palestinian officials as Yassin Omar Serda, after detaining him in the town of Jericho.

In a statement, the military said the man was armed with an iron rod and ran toward the soldiers in an attempt to strike them. The troops, it said, were on a raid to arrest “suspects” in the town.

“In response to the immediate threat, the troops fired toward the assailant and confronted him from close range and were able to stop him,” the military said.

“A knife was also found in his possession. Troops evacuated him to a hospital to receive medical treatment. His death was later announced. The incident is being reviewed.”

The Palestinian Information Ministry said about 20 soldiers had administered a “heavy beating” to Serda, especially on his stomach and back.

“The Information Ministry views (his) martyrdom … shortly after his arrest a cold-blooded execution,” it said.

Serda’s family said it was seeking to have an autopsy performed.

Israeli troops frequently mount raids in the West Bank to detain suspected militants. Israel captured the territory in the 1967 Middle East war. Palestinians seek to establish a state in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, with East Jerusalem as its capital.

An Israeli soldier, Elor Azaria, was sentenced last February to 18 months imprisonment for killing a wounded and incapacitated Palestinian assailant in the West Bank town of Hebron in 2015. He was convicted of manslaughter, a crime that carries a maximum sentence of 20 years.

His trial was one of the most divisive in Israeli history. Supporters argued he was justified in shooting a Palestinian whom they said had intended to kill Israelis. The military said he violated standing orders and that his conduct was unbecoming of an Israeli soldier.

Writing by Jeffrey Heller; Additional reporting by Ori Lewis, Mustafa Abu Ganayeh and Ali Sawafta; Editing by Janet Lawrence

References

  1. ^ The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. (thomsonreuters.com)
0

Pentagon leaders reportedly worried about Trump's military parade …

The Pentagon is raining on President Trump’s parade.

Defense Department brass is concerned trotting soldiers, missiles and heavy weaponry through Washington, D.C., in a grand fashion will create military chaos, an official with knowledge of the early planning told CNN[1].

“We don’t have troops and units sitting around waiting to do a parade,” the unnamed official said.

The Pentagon might also have to stick out its hand for private donations because the demonstration could cost tens of millions of dollars, another Defense Department official told the network.

Trump’s controversial military parade could cost $30 million[2]

Trump asked the Pentagon to draw up plans for a massive military parade after attending the Bastille Day celebration in Paris last year.

But the idea has been panned by lawmakers from both sides of the aisle, who argue it’d mimic a military dictatorship.

And one of the officials who spoke with CNN said early planning put the cost anywhere from $3 million to $50 million.

White House budget chief Mick Mulvaney said last week such an event will cost upwards of $30 million[3], but the Trump administration hasn’t budgeted for the procession yet.

Soldier who killed bin Laden calls Trump’s parade ‘bulls–t’[4]

The Defense Department might turn to donations to cover expenses other than military pay or costs tied to moving equipment, CNN reported[5].

Trump was reportedly inspired by the Bastille Day parade in France last year.

Trump was reportedly inspired by the Bastille Day parade in France last year.

(GONZALO FUENTES/REUTERS)

The Army handles parade planning, and reportedly sent a “small, medium, heavy, hybrid and a multimedia display” to military leaders.

The Defense Department has favored more of an air display, CNN reported, a reflection of how iffy it is about the parade.

The “heavy” option includes bringing active duty troops — basically all those not deployed — to the capital.

Trump ordered armed forces parade out of ‘affection’ for military[6]

Going that route could disrupt military exercises, which are commonplace for units not in combat, CNN noted.

Planners have also examined the “multimedia” route, which would feature large screens displaying massive military weapons — a bid to save on actually transporting them to Washington.

The Pentagon didn’t immediately return a request for comment, and referred CNN to past statements[7] about the potential procession.

Defense Department spokeswoman Dana White told reporters earlier this month that plans are being worked out.

Critics blast Trump ‘Napoleon in the making’ military parade plan[8]

“We’re still in the nascent stages,” she said. “When we have those options, we will provide that to the White House, and the President will decide.”

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NC Guard 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team prepares for XCTC

North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
1 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
2 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC).
3 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC). (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
4 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
5 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
6 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[6]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
7 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[7]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
8 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[8]

FORT BRAGG, N.C. – A dry-fire exercise means that no ammunition is used, however, soldiers conduct all training safely as though live rounds are being shot.

“In this phase we are going through dry-run Bradley gunnery qualification tables,” said Master Sgt. William Scharinger, 1-252nd Armor Regiment Master Gunner. “During next drill we will conduct live fire exercises.”

Bradleys are armored personnel carriers designed to transport troops while providing covering fire.

A Bradley crew is a three-soldier team consisting of a Bradley commander, a gunner and a driver. Crew tasks include disassembling and assembling a M240L Light Machine Gun, and a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven auto cannon. Crews also work together to destroy targets in a simulated combat exercise.

“There are so many different elements that come into play and it is important to create cohesion between the various groups,” Scharinger said.

In the near future, these crews will join with the rest of the 30th ABCT to attend XCTC training at Fort Bliss, Texas.

“With training we can synchronize out efforts across all the battalions down to platoon size elements,” said Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the brigade. “There are a lot of working parts and having all units training at one time gives us the ability to catch issues we might not have had.”

The XCTC program is an instrumented brigade field training exercise designed to certify platoon proficiency in coordination with First Army. The end goal of XCTC is to ready the 30th ABCT for the National Training Center (NTC) which further qualifies the brigade for deployment.

“We are going through crawl, walk, and run phases to get units ready for deployment,” Bumgardner said. “You rise to the level that you train at — we need to train at a higher level.”

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  6. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  7. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  8. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

NC Guard 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team prepares for XCTC

North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
1 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
2 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC).
3 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC). (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
4 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
5 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
6 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[6]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
7 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[7]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
8 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[8]

FORT BRAGG, N.C. – A dry-fire exercise means that no ammunition is used, however, soldiers conduct all training safely as though live rounds are being shot.

“In this phase we are going through dry-run Bradley gunnery qualification tables,” said Master Sgt. William Scharinger, 1-252nd Armor Regiment Master Gunner. “During next drill we will conduct live fire exercises.”

Bradleys are armored personnel carriers designed to transport troops while providing covering fire.

A Bradley crew is a three-soldier team consisting of a Bradley commander, a gunner and a driver. Crew tasks include disassembling and assembling a M240L Light Machine Gun, and a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven auto cannon. Crews also work together to destroy targets in a simulated combat exercise.

“There are so many different elements that come into play and it is important to create cohesion between the various groups,” Scharinger said.

In the near future, these crews will join with the rest of the 30th ABCT to attend XCTC training at Fort Bliss, Texas.

“With training we can synchronize out efforts across all the battalions down to platoon size elements,” said Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the brigade. “There are a lot of working parts and having all units training at one time gives us the ability to catch issues we might not have had.”

The XCTC program is an instrumented brigade field training exercise designed to certify platoon proficiency in coordination with First Army. The end goal of XCTC is to ready the 30th ABCT for the National Training Center (NTC) which further qualifies the brigade for deployment.

“We are going through crawl, walk, and run phases to get units ready for deployment,” Bumgardner said. “You rise to the level that you train at — we need to train at a higher level.”

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  6. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  7. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  8. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

NC Guard 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team prepares for XCTC

North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
1 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
2 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC).
3 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC). (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
4 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
5 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
6 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[6]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
7 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[7]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
8 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[8]

FORT BRAGG, N.C. – A dry-fire exercise means that no ammunition is used, however, soldiers conduct all training safely as though live rounds are being shot.

“In this phase we are going through dry-run Bradley gunnery qualification tables,” said Master Sgt. William Scharinger, 1-252nd Armor Regiment Master Gunner. “During next drill we will conduct live fire exercises.”

Bradleys are armored personnel carriers designed to transport troops while providing covering fire.

A Bradley crew is a three-soldier team consisting of a Bradley commander, a gunner and a driver. Crew tasks include disassembling and assembling a M240L Light Machine Gun, and a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven auto cannon. Crews also work together to destroy targets in a simulated combat exercise.

“There are so many different elements that come into play and it is important to create cohesion between the various groups,” Scharinger said.

In the near future, these crews will join with the rest of the 30th ABCT to attend XCTC training at Fort Bliss, Texas.

“With training we can synchronize out efforts across all the battalions down to platoon size elements,” said Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the brigade. “There are a lot of working parts and having all units training at one time gives us the ability to catch issues we might not have had.”

The XCTC program is an instrumented brigade field training exercise designed to certify platoon proficiency in coordination with First Army. The end goal of XCTC is to ready the 30th ABCT for the National Training Center (NTC) which further qualifies the brigade for deployment.

“We are going through crawl, walk, and run phases to get units ready for deployment,” Bumgardner said. “You rise to the level that you train at — we need to train at a higher level.”

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  6. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  7. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  8. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

NC Guard 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team prepares for XCTC

North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
1 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
2 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC).
3 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC). (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
4 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
5 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
6 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[6]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
7 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[7]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
8 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[8]

FORT BRAGG, N.C. – A dry-fire exercise means that no ammunition is used, however, soldiers conduct all training safely as though live rounds are being shot.

“In this phase we are going through dry-run Bradley gunnery qualification tables,” said Master Sgt. William Scharinger, 1-252nd Armor Regiment Master Gunner. “During next drill we will conduct live fire exercises.”

Bradleys are armored personnel carriers designed to transport troops while providing covering fire.

A Bradley crew is a three-soldier team consisting of a Bradley commander, a gunner and a driver. Crew tasks include disassembling and assembling a M240L Light Machine Gun, and a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven auto cannon. Crews also work together to destroy targets in a simulated combat exercise.

“There are so many different elements that come into play and it is important to create cohesion between the various groups,” Scharinger said.

In the near future, these crews will join with the rest of the 30th ABCT to attend XCTC training at Fort Bliss, Texas.

“With training we can synchronize out efforts across all the battalions down to platoon size elements,” said Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the brigade. “There are a lot of working parts and having all units training at one time gives us the ability to catch issues we might not have had.”

The XCTC program is an instrumented brigade field training exercise designed to certify platoon proficiency in coordination with First Army. The end goal of XCTC is to ready the 30th ABCT for the National Training Center (NTC) which further qualifies the brigade for deployment.

“We are going through crawl, walk, and run phases to get units ready for deployment,” Bumgardner said. “You rise to the level that you train at — we need to train at a higher level.”

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  6. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  7. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  8. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

NC Guard 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team prepares for XCTC

North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
1 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
2 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC).
3 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC). (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
4 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
5 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
6 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[6]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
7 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[7]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
8 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[8]

FORT BRAGG, N.C. – A dry-fire exercise means that no ammunition is used, however, soldiers conduct all training safely as though live rounds are being shot.

“In this phase we are going through dry-run Bradley gunnery qualification tables,” said Master Sgt. William Scharinger, 1-252nd Armor Regiment Master Gunner. “During next drill we will conduct live fire exercises.”

Bradleys are armored personnel carriers designed to transport troops while providing covering fire.

A Bradley crew is a three-soldier team consisting of a Bradley commander, a gunner and a driver. Crew tasks include disassembling and assembling a M240L Light Machine Gun, and a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven auto cannon. Crews also work together to destroy targets in a simulated combat exercise.

“There are so many different elements that come into play and it is important to create cohesion between the various groups,” Scharinger said.

In the near future, these crews will join with the rest of the 30th ABCT to attend XCTC training at Fort Bliss, Texas.

“With training we can synchronize out efforts across all the battalions down to platoon size elements,” said Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the brigade. “There are a lot of working parts and having all units training at one time gives us the ability to catch issues we might not have had.”

The XCTC program is an instrumented brigade field training exercise designed to certify platoon proficiency in coordination with First Army. The end goal of XCTC is to ready the 30th ABCT for the National Training Center (NTC) which further qualifies the brigade for deployment.

“We are going through crawl, walk, and run phases to get units ready for deployment,” Bumgardner said. “You rise to the level that you train at — we need to train at a higher level.”

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  6. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  7. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  8. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

NC Guard 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team prepares for XCTC

North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
1 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
2 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC).
3 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC). (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
4 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
5 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
6 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[6]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
7 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[7]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
8 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[8]

FORT BRAGG, N.C. – A dry-fire exercise means that no ammunition is used, however, soldiers conduct all training safely as though live rounds are being shot.

“In this phase we are going through dry-run Bradley gunnery qualification tables,” said Master Sgt. William Scharinger, 1-252nd Armor Regiment Master Gunner. “During next drill we will conduct live fire exercises.”

Bradleys are armored personnel carriers designed to transport troops while providing covering fire.

A Bradley crew is a three-soldier team consisting of a Bradley commander, a gunner and a driver. Crew tasks include disassembling and assembling a M240L Light Machine Gun, and a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven auto cannon. Crews also work together to destroy targets in a simulated combat exercise.

“There are so many different elements that come into play and it is important to create cohesion between the various groups,” Scharinger said.

In the near future, these crews will join with the rest of the 30th ABCT to attend XCTC training at Fort Bliss, Texas.

“With training we can synchronize out efforts across all the battalions down to platoon size elements,” said Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the brigade. “There are a lot of working parts and having all units training at one time gives us the ability to catch issues we might not have had.”

The XCTC program is an instrumented brigade field training exercise designed to certify platoon proficiency in coordination with First Army. The end goal of XCTC is to ready the 30th ABCT for the National Training Center (NTC) which further qualifies the brigade for deployment.

“We are going through crawl, walk, and run phases to get units ready for deployment,” Bumgardner said. “You rise to the level that you train at — we need to train at a higher level.”

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  6. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  7. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  8. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

NC Guard 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team prepares for XCTC

North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
1 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
2 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC).
3 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC). (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
4 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
5 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
6 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[6]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
7 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[7]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
8 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[8]

FORT BRAGG, N.C. – A dry-fire exercise means that no ammunition is used, however, soldiers conduct all training safely as though live rounds are being shot.

“In this phase we are going through dry-run Bradley gunnery qualification tables,” said Master Sgt. William Scharinger, 1-252nd Armor Regiment Master Gunner. “During next drill we will conduct live fire exercises.”

Bradleys are armored personnel carriers designed to transport troops while providing covering fire.

A Bradley crew is a three-soldier team consisting of a Bradley commander, a gunner and a driver. Crew tasks include disassembling and assembling a M240L Light Machine Gun, and a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven auto cannon. Crews also work together to destroy targets in a simulated combat exercise.

“There are so many different elements that come into play and it is important to create cohesion between the various groups,” Scharinger said.

In the near future, these crews will join with the rest of the 30th ABCT to attend XCTC training at Fort Bliss, Texas.

“With training we can synchronize out efforts across all the battalions down to platoon size elements,” said Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the brigade. “There are a lot of working parts and having all units training at one time gives us the ability to catch issues we might not have had.”

The XCTC program is an instrumented brigade field training exercise designed to certify platoon proficiency in coordination with First Army. The end goal of XCTC is to ready the 30th ABCT for the National Training Center (NTC) which further qualifies the brigade for deployment.

“We are going through crawl, walk, and run phases to get units ready for deployment,” Bumgardner said. “You rise to the level that you train at — we need to train at a higher level.”

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  6. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  7. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  8. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

NC Guard 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team prepares for XCTC

North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
1 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
2 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC).
3 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC). (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
4 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A soldier from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, performs routine maintenance on a bolt and track component of a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, autocannon during training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training.
5 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – North Carolina National Guard officer, Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, demonstrates how to disassemble a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven autocannon during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018, as the Brigade prepares for their upcoming eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) training. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
6 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[6]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
7 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, conduct a simulated combat exercise during Bradley Fighting Vehicle training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[7]
Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018.
8 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from the North Carolina National Guard, 1-252nd Armor Regiment, 30th Armored Brigade Combat Team, prepare their Bradley Fighting Vehicles for training at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2018. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ason Forsyth) VIEW ORIGINAL[8]

FORT BRAGG, N.C. – A dry-fire exercise means that no ammunition is used, however, soldiers conduct all training safely as though live rounds are being shot.

“In this phase we are going through dry-run Bradley gunnery qualification tables,” said Master Sgt. William Scharinger, 1-252nd Armor Regiment Master Gunner. “During next drill we will conduct live fire exercises.”

Bradleys are armored personnel carriers designed to transport troops while providing covering fire.

A Bradley crew is a three-soldier team consisting of a Bradley commander, a gunner and a driver. Crew tasks include disassembling and assembling a M240L Light Machine Gun, and a M242 Bushmaster, 25 millimeter, chain-driven auto cannon. Crews also work together to destroy targets in a simulated combat exercise.

“There are so many different elements that come into play and it is important to create cohesion between the various groups,” Scharinger said.

In the near future, these crews will join with the rest of the 30th ABCT to attend XCTC training at Fort Bliss, Texas.

“With training we can synchronize out efforts across all the battalions down to platoon size elements,” said Col. Robert Bumgardner, commander of the brigade. “There are a lot of working parts and having all units training at one time gives us the ability to catch issues we might not have had.”

The XCTC program is an instrumented brigade field training exercise designed to certify platoon proficiency in coordination with First Army. The end goal of XCTC is to ready the 30th ABCT for the National Training Center (NTC) which further qualifies the brigade for deployment.

“We are going through crawl, walk, and run phases to get units ready for deployment,” Bumgardner said. “You rise to the level that you train at — we need to train at a higher level.”

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
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  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  6. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  7. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  8. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)