Tagged: services

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Trump's Military Parade Could Cost As Much As $50 Million

Tanks parade past President Trump, first lady Melania Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron, on July 14 during the Bastille Day parade on the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris. Trump requested the Pentagon plan a similar parade for Washington, D.C., and they’ve produced five options ranging in cost from $3 million to $50 million. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Carolyn Kaster/AP

Picture this: troops in vintage uniforms marching through the streets as military aircraft carve the skies overhead, all in a grand celebration of Veterans Day and the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. That’s one scenario taking shape as the Pentagon maps out options for the military parade President Trump has requested.

In response to Trump’s request, the Department of Defense has worked up five options, with price tags ranging from $3 million to as much as $50 million, a U.S. official told NPR.

Meanwhile White House budget director Mick Mulvaney told the House Budget Committee on Wednesday that “very preliminary” estimates he had seen put the cost at between $10 million and $30 million “depending on the size of the parade, the scope of it, the length of it, those kinds of things.”

“Obviously an hour parade is different than a five-hour parade in terms of the cost and the equipment and those types of things,” Mulvaney added.

Trump has said he wants to try to top the French Bastille Day parade he attended last year in Paris, which lasted just over two hours.

“We had a lot of planes going over and we had a lot of military might, and it was really a beautiful thing to see,” Trump said in September, describing the French parade from two months earlier. “They had representatives from different wars and different uniforms. It was really so well done.”

You can see the influence of that parade in what the White House requested the Pentagon plot out, right down to the uniforms from wars past.

According to the official, the request was for a parade that would take place on Veterans Day, with a World War I theme, featuring military aircraft, heavy armored vehicles — possibly including tanks — and troops from all the services taking part. Troops wearing World War I uniforms are also in the mix.

The last military parade through the streets of Washington, D.C., was in 1991, to celebrate victory in Operation Desert Storm. There also were parades at the conclusion of the Civil War, World War I and World War II. There isn’t a tradition of military parades in the U.S. outside of war victories and Cold War-era presidential inaugurations. And 16 years into the war in Afghanistan, there is no clear path to victory.

By potentially tying the parade to the 100th anniversary of the end of the War To End All Wars, there may be an effort to associate with the tradition of celebrating war victories and avoid associations with countries like North Korea, China and Russia, which regularly hold military parades, in part for their propaganda value.

Members of Congress from both parties have been critical of the idea of a military parade, questioning its cost and necessity.

“I think confidence is silent and insecurity is loud,” said Sen. John Kennedy (R-La.) last week to reporters in the Capitol. “America is the most powerful country in all of human history; you don’t need to show it off.”

Three White House spokesmen did not respond to a request for comment about the emerging details and cost estimates, but last week Press Secretary Sarah Sanders described the president’s motivation.

“President Trump is incredibly supportive of America’s great service members who risk their lives every day to keep our country safe,” she said. “He has asked the Department of Defense to explore a celebration at which all Americans can show their appreciation.”

References

  1. ^ Enlarge this image (media.npr.org)
0

Trump's Military Parade Could Cost As Much As $50 Million

Tanks parade past President Trump, first lady Melania Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron, on July 14 during the Bastille Day parade on the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris. Trump requested the Pentagon plan a similar parade for Washington, D.C., and they’ve produced five options ranging in cost from $3 million to $50 million. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Carolyn Kaster/AP

Picture this: troops in vintage uniforms marching through the streets as military aircraft carve the skies overhead, all in a grand celebration of Veterans Day and the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. That’s one scenario taking shape as the Pentagon maps out options for the military parade President Trump has requested.

In response to Trump’s request, the Department of Defense has worked up five options, with price tags ranging from $3 million to as much as $50 million, a U.S. official told NPR.

Meanwhile White House budget director Mick Mulvaney told the House Budget Committee on Wednesday that “very preliminary” estimates he had seen put the cost at between $10 million and $30 million “depending on the size of the parade, the scope of it, the length of it, those kinds of things.”

“Obviously an hour parade is different than a five-hour parade in terms of the cost and the equipment and those types of things,” Mulvaney added.

Trump has said he wants to try to top the French Bastille Day parade he attended last year in Paris, which lasted just over two hours.

“We had a lot of planes going over and we had a lot of military might, and it was really a beautiful thing to see,” Trump said in September, describing the French parade from two months earlier. “They had representatives from different wars and different uniforms. It was really so well done.”

You can see the influence of that parade in what the White House requested the Pentagon plot out, right down to the uniforms from wars past.

According to the official, the request was for a parade that would take place on Veterans Day, with a World War I theme, featuring military aircraft, heavy armored vehicles — possibly including tanks — and troops from all the services taking part. Troops wearing World War I uniforms are also in the mix.

The last military parade through the streets of Washington, D.C., was in 1991, to celebrate victory in Operation Desert Storm. There also were parades at the conclusion of the Civil War, World War I and World War II. There isn’t a tradition of military parades in the U.S. outside of war victories and Cold War-era presidential inaugurations. And 16 years into the war in Afghanistan, there is no clear path to victory.

By potentially tying the parade to the 100th anniversary of the end of the War To End All Wars, there may be an effort to associate with the tradition of celebrating war victories and avoid associations with countries like North Korea, China and Russia, which regularly hold military parades, in part for their propaganda value.

Members of Congress from both parties have been critical of the idea of a military parade, questioning its cost and necessity.

“I think confidence is silent and insecurity is loud,” said Sen. John Kennedy (R-La.) last week to reporters in the Capitol. “America is the most powerful country in all of human history; you don’t need to show it off.”

Three White House spokesmen did not respond to a request for comment about the emerging details and cost estimates, but last week Press Secretary Sarah Sanders described the president’s motivation.

“President Trump is incredibly supportive of America’s great service members who risk their lives every day to keep our country safe,” she said. “He has asked the Department of Defense to explore a celebration at which all Americans can show their appreciation.”

References

  1. ^ Enlarge this image (media.npr.org)
0

Trump's Military Parade Could Cost As Much As $50 Million

Tanks parade past President Trump, first lady Melania Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron, on July 14 during the Bastille Day parade on the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris. Trump requested the Pentagon plan a similar parade for Washington, D.C., and they’ve produced five options ranging in cost from $3 million to $50 million. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Carolyn Kaster/AP

Picture this: troops in vintage uniforms marching through the streets as military aircraft carve the skies overhead, all in a grand celebration of Veterans Day and the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. That’s one scenario taking shape as the Pentagon maps out options for the military parade President Trump has requested.

In response to Trump’s request, the Department of Defense has worked up five options, with price tags ranging from $3 million to as much as $50 million, a U.S. official told NPR.

Meanwhile White House budget director Mick Mulvaney told the House Budget Committee on Wednesday that “very preliminary” estimates he had seen put the cost at between $10 million and $30 million “depending on the size of the parade, the scope of it, the length of it, those kinds of things.”

“Obviously an hour parade is different than a five-hour parade in terms of the cost and the equipment and those types of things,” Mulvaney added.

Trump has said he wants to try to top the French Bastille Day parade he attended last year in Paris. It lasted just over two hours.

“We had a lot of planes going over and we had a lot of military might, and it was really a beautiful thing to see,” Trump said in September describing the French parade from two months earlier. “They had representatives from different wars and different uniforms. It was really so well done.”

You can see the influence of that parade in what the White House requested the Pentagon plot out, right down to the uniforms from wars past.

According to the official, the request was for a parade that would take place on Veterans Day, with a World War I theme, featuring military aircraft, heavy armored vehicles — possibly including tanks — and troops from all the services taking part. Troops wearing World War I uniforms are also in the mix.

The last military parade through the streets of Washington, D.C., was in 1991 to celebrate victory in Operation Desert Storm. There also were parades at the conclusion of the Civil War, World War I and World War II. There isn’t a tradition of military parades in the U.S. outside of war victories and Cold War-era presidential inaugurations. And 16 years into the war in Afghanistan, there is no clear path to victory.

By potentially tying the parade to the 100th anniversary of the end of the The War To End All Wars, there may be an effort to associate with that tradition of celebrating war victories and avoid associations with countries like North Korea, China and Russia, which regularly hold military parades, in part for their propaganda value.

Members of Congress from both parties have been critical of the idea of a military parade, questioning its cost and necessity.

“I think confidence is silent and insecurity is loud,” said Sen. John Kennedy (R-La.) last week to reporters in the Capitol. “America is the most powerful country in all of human history; you don’t need to show it off.”

Three White House spokesmen did not respond to a request for comment about the emerging details and cost estimates, but last week Press Secretary Sarah Sanders described the president’s motivation.

“President Trump is incredibly supportive of America’s great service members who risk their lives every day to keep our country safe,” she said. “He has asked the Department of Defense to explore a celebration at which all Americans can show their appreciation.”

References

  1. ^ Enlarge this image (media.npr.org)
0

Myanmar's presence downplayed at Thai-US military exercise

U-TAPAO AIR BASE, Thailand –  Thailand and the United States downplayed the presence of a Myanmar military officer at the opening Tuesday of the largest annual joint military exercise in Southeast Asia.

Myanmar’s military has been accused of massive human rights violations in its crackdown on the Rohingya Muslim minority, who have fled by the hundreds of thousands to neighboring Bangladesh. U.S. lawmakers had demanded Myanmar’s exclusion from the exercise.

“The truth is Myanmar is not a participant nation,” U.S. Ambassador to Thailand Glyn T. Davies told reporters at in the Cobra Gold exercise in eastern Thailand. “They’re not part of the exercises here.” He did not explain the Myanmar officer’s attendance.

Thai Gen. Thanchaiyan Srisuwan acknowledged inviting Myanmar to the opening ceremony. However, Myanmar’s flag was not flown at the ceremonial opening. It’s believed the Thais invited Myanmar to send three personnel though only one appeared to be attending.

In Washington last week, both Republican and Democrat members of congress criticized the invitation to Myanmar. Sen. John McCain, the Republican chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee, told The Associated Press “militaries engaged in ethnic cleansing should not be honing their skills alongside U.S. troops,” a reference to accounts of atrocities committed by Myanmar troops.

A U.S. statement said 11,075 service members from 29 countries are taking part in this year’s exercise, with Thailand, the U.S., Singapore, Japan, South Korea, Indonesia and Malaysia the seven main participants.

It said the aims of the exercise are to enhance security cooperation, develop peacekeeping forces and maintain readiness for humanitarian aid and disaster relief missions.

The exercise includes humanitarian components, such as evacuation drills, as well as traditional military exercises such as amphibious landings.

Disaster relief has assumed a high profile in recent years, especially after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami that killed 230,000 people in 14 countries. Multinational forces mobilized for relief efforts after that crisis, as they did again on a more limited scale after 2008’s Cyclone Nargis devastated Myanmar, killing upward of 130,000 people.

Davies, in an indirect reference to such crises, told reporters that “It’s very important that everyone from around the region have an eye on what’s happening here and to some extent to be part of it, but I’ll come back to what I said earlier that Burma is not a participating nation.” Burma is the old name for Myanmar before it was changed by the country’s previous military government, and is still used by the governments of the U.S. and several other nations.

0

Myanmar's presence downplayed at Thai-US military exercise

U-TAPAO AIR BASE, Thailand –  Thailand and the United States downplayed the presence of a Myanmar military officer at the opening Tuesday of the largest annual joint military exercise in Southeast Asia.

Myanmar’s military has been accused of massive human rights violations in its crackdown on the Rohingya Muslim minority, who have fled by the hundreds of thousands to neighboring Bangladesh. U.S. lawmakers had demanded Myanmar’s exclusion from the exercise.

“The truth is Myanmar is not a participant nation,” U.S. Ambassador to Thailand Glyn T. Davies told reporters at in the Cobra Gold exercise in eastern Thailand. “They’re not part of the exercises here.” He did not explain the Myanmar officer’s attendance.

Thai Gen. Thanchaiyan Srisuwan acknowledged inviting Myanmar to the opening ceremony. However, Myanmar’s flag was not flown at the ceremonial opening. It’s believed the Thais invited Myanmar to send three personnel though only one appeared to be attending.

In Washington last week, both Republican and Democrat members of congress criticized the invitation to Myanmar. Sen. John McCain, the Republican chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee, told The Associated Press “militaries engaged in ethnic cleansing should not be honing their skills alongside U.S. troops,” a reference to accounts of atrocities committed by Myanmar troops.

A U.S. statement said 11,075 service members from 29 countries are taking part in this year’s exercise, with Thailand, the U.S., Singapore, Japan, South Korea, Indonesia and Malaysia the seven main participants.

It said the aims of the exercise are to enhance security cooperation, develop peacekeeping forces and maintain readiness for humanitarian aid and disaster relief missions.

The exercise includes humanitarian components, such as evacuation drills, as well as traditional military exercises such as amphibious landings.

Disaster relief has assumed a high profile in recent years, especially after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami that killed 230,000 people in 14 countries. Multinational forces mobilized for relief efforts after that crisis, as they did again on a more limited scale after 2008’s Cyclone Nargis devastated Myanmar, killing upward of 130,000 people.

Davies, in an indirect reference to such crises, told reporters that “It’s very important that everyone from around the region have an eye on what’s happening here and to some extent to be part of it, but I’ll come back to what I said earlier that Burma is not a participating nation.” Burma is the old name for Myanmar before it was changed by the country’s previous military government, and is still used by the governments of the U.S. and several other nations.

0

Homeland Security calls NBC report on election hacking 'false …

The Department of Homeland Security on Monday pushed back against a recent NBC News report claiming that Russian hackers “successfully penetrated” U.S. voter roles before the 2016 elections, calling it misleading.

“Recent NBC reporting has misrepresented facts and confused the public with regard to Department of Homeland Security and state and local government efforts to combat election hacking,” Jeanette Manfra, the department’s chief cybersecurity official, said in a statement. 

The article published[1] by NBC last week drew on an exclusive interview with Manfra, during which she told the publication that U.S. officials observed “a targeting of 21 states and an exceptionally small number of them were actually successfully penetrated.” 

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Manfra’s comments echoed testimony she delivered before the Senate Intelligence Committee last June, in which she confirmed publicly that election-related systems in 21 states were targeted ahead of the election.

Citing her comments, NBC reported that Russia “successfully penetrated the voter registration rolls of several U.S. states” before the election. 

In a statement, a spokesperson for NBC defended the network’s reporting as accurate. 

“It’s hard to believe DHS actually watched or read NBC’s report. Our story is accurate, and makes all of the very same points this statement accuses us of not making,” the spokesperson said. 

Manfra said Monday morning, “NBC News continues to falsely report my recent comments on attempted election hacking — which clearly mirror my testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee last summer — as some kind of ‘breaking news,’ incorrectly claiming a shift in the administration’s position on cyber threats.”

“As I said eight months ago, a number of states were the target of Russian government cyber actors seeking vulnerabilities and access to U.S. election infrastructure,” she said. 

Homeland Security has maintained that most of the pre-2016 targeting efforts involved mere preparations for hacking, like scanning for vulnerabilities, and were not ultimately successful. 

Officials in both Illinois and Arizona have said that hackers tried to break into voter roles in their respective states. Hackers successfully accessed records on 200,000 Illinois voters by penetrating the state voter database. In Arizona, officials say that hackers successfully delivered malware to a county election official’s computer but that malicious actors never actually made it into the system.

Homeland Security notified all 21 states of the targeting efforts last September. Officials in some states have disputed the conclusions, saying that the evidence did not point to targeting of actual election infrastructure. 

“NBC’s irresponsible reporting, which is being roundly criticized elsewhere in the media and by security experts alike, undermines the ability of the Department of Homeland Security, our partners at the Election Assistance Commission, and state and local officials across the nation to do our incredibly important jobs,” Manfra said.

Homeland Security is providing cyber scanning and other services to state officials who request it as part of its new critical infrastructure designation for voting systems and infrastructure. The department is also working to bolster threat intelligence sharing with election officials in states across the country. 

Manfra’s statement on Monday came after the National Association of Secretaries of State, which represents a number of chief election officials, similarly criticized NBC for misleading reporting.

This post was updated at 12:56 p.m. to reflect a statement from NBC News. 

References

  1. ^ published (www.nbcnews.com)
0

Homeland Security calls NBC report on election hacking 'false …

The Department of Homeland Security on Monday pushed back against a recent NBC News report claiming that Russian hackers “successfully penetrated” U.S. voter roles before the 2016 elections, calling it misleading.

“Recent NBC reporting has misrepresented facts and confused the public with regard to Department of Homeland Security and state and local government efforts to combat election hacking,” Jeanette Manfra, the department’s chief cybersecurity official, said in a statement. 

The article published[1] by NBC last week drew on an exclusive interview with Manfra, during which she told the publication that U.S. officials observed “a targeting of 21 states and an exceptionally small number of them were actually successfully penetrated.” 

ADVERTISEMENT

Manfra’s comments echoed testimony she delivered before the Senate Intelligence Committee last June, in which she confirmed publicly that election-related systems in 21 states were targeted ahead of the election.

Citing her comments, NBC reported that Russia “successfully penetrated the voter registration rolls of several U.S. states” before the election. 

In a statement, a spokesperson for NBC defended the network’s reporting as accurate. 

“It’s hard to believe DHS actually watched or read NBC’s report. Our story is accurate, and makes all of the very same points this statement accuses us of not making,” the spokesperson said. 

Manfra said Monday morning, “NBC News continues to falsely report my recent comments on attempted election hacking — which clearly mirror my testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee last summer — as some kind of ‘breaking news,’ incorrectly claiming a shift in the administration’s position on cyber threats.”

“As I said eight months ago, a number of states were the target of Russian government cyber actors seeking vulnerabilities and access to U.S. election infrastructure,” she said. 

Homeland Security has maintained that most of the pre-2016 targeting efforts involved mere preparations for hacking, like scanning for vulnerabilities, and were not ultimately successful. 

Officials in both Illinois and Arizona have said that hackers tried to break into voter roles in their respective states. Hackers successfully accessed records on 200,000 Illinois voters by penetrating the state voter database. In Arizona, officials say that hackers successfully delivered malware to a county election official’s computer but that malicious actors never actually made it into the system.

Homeland Security notified all 21 states of the targeting efforts last September. Officials in some states have disputed the conclusions, saying that the evidence did not point to targeting of actual election infrastructure. 

“NBC’s irresponsible reporting, which is being roundly criticized elsewhere in the media and by security experts alike, undermines the ability of the Department of Homeland Security, our partners at the Election Assistance Commission, and state and local officials across the nation to do our incredibly important jobs,” Manfra said.

Homeland Security is providing cyber scanning and other services to state officials who request it as part of its new critical infrastructure designation for voting systems and infrastructure. The department is also working to bolster threat intelligence sharing with election officials in states across the country. 

Manfra’s statement on Monday came after the National Association of Secretaries of State, which represents a number of chief election officials, similarly criticized NBC for misleading reporting.

This post was updated at 12:56 p.m. to reflect a statement from NBC News. 

References

  1. ^ published (www.nbcnews.com)
0

Homeland Security calls NBC report on election hacking 'false'

The Department of Homeland Security on Monday pushed back against a recent NBC News report claiming that Russian hackers “successfully penetrated” U.S. voter roles before the 2016 elections, calling it misleading.

“Recent NBC reporting has misrepresented facts and confused the public with regard to Department of Homeland Security and state and local government efforts to combat election hacking,” Jeanette Manfra, the department’s chief cybersecurity official, said in a statement. 

The article published[1] by NBC last week drew on an exclusive interview with Manfra, during which she told the publication that U.S. officials observed “a targeting of 21 states and an exceptionally small number of them were actually successfully penetrated.” 

ADVERTISEMENT

Manfra’s comments echoed testimony she delivered before the Senate Intelligence Committee last June, in which she confirmed publicly that election-related systems in 21 states were targeted ahead of the election.

Citing her comments, NBC reported that Russia “successfully penetrated the voter registration rolls of several U.S. states” before the election. 

In a statement, a spokesperson for NBC defended the network’s reporting as accurate. 

“It’s hard to believe DHS actually watched or read NBC’s report. Our story is accurate, and makes all of the very same points this statement accuses us of not making,” the spokesperson said. 

Manfra said Monday morning, “NBC News continues to falsely report my recent comments on attempted election hacking — which clearly mirror my testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee last summer — as some kind of ‘breaking news,’ incorrectly claiming a shift in the administration’s position on cyber threats.”

“As I said eight months ago, a number of states were the target of Russian government cyber actors seeking vulnerabilities and access to U.S. election infrastructure,” she said. 

Homeland Security has maintained that most of the pre-2016 targeting efforts involved mere preparations for hacking, like scanning for vulnerabilities, and were not ultimately successful. 

Officials in both Illinois and Arizona have said that hackers tried to break into voter roles in their respective states. Hackers successfully accessed records on 200,000 Illinois voters by penetrating the state voter database. In Arizona, officials say that hackers successfully delivered malware to a county election official’s computer but that malicious actors never actually made it into the system.

Homeland Security notified all 21 states of the targeting efforts last September. Officials in some states have disputed the conclusions, saying that the evidence did not point to targeting of actual election infrastructure. 

“NBC’s irresponsible reporting, which is being roundly criticized elsewhere in the media and by security experts alike, undermines the ability of the Department of Homeland Security, our partners at the Election Assistance Commission, and state and local officials across the nation to do our incredibly important jobs,” Manfra said.

Homeland Security is providing cyber scanning and other services to state officials who request it as part of its new critical infrastructure designation for voting systems and infrastructure. The department is also working to bolster threat intelligence sharing with election officials in states across the country. 

Manfra’s statement on Monday came after the National Association of Secretaries of State, which represents a number of chief election officials, similarly criticized NBC for misleading reporting.

This post was updated at 12:56 p.m. to reflect a statement from NBC News. 

References

  1. ^ published (www.nbcnews.com)
0

Homeland Security calls NBC report on election hacking 'false …

The Department of Homeland Security on Monday pushed back against a recent NBC News report claiming that Russian hackers “successfully penetrated” U.S. voter roles before the 2016 elections, calling it misleading.

“Recent NBC reporting has misrepresented facts and confused the public with regard to Department of Homeland Security and state and local government efforts to combat election hacking,” Jeanette Manfra, the department’s chief cybersecurity official, said in a statement. 

The article published[1] by NBC last week drew on an exclusive interview with Manfra, during which she told the publication that U.S. officials observed “a targeting of 21 states and an exceptionally small number of them were actually successfully penetrated.” 

ADVERTISEMENT

Manfra’s comments echoed testimony she delivered before the Senate Intelligence Committee last June, in which she confirmed publicly that election-related systems in 21 states were targeted ahead of the election.

Citing her comments, NBC reported that Russia “successfully penetrated the voter registration rolls of several U.S. states” before the election. 

In a statement, a spokesperson for NBC defended the network’s reporting as accurate. 

“It’s hard to believe DHS actually watched or read NBC’s report. Our story is accurate, and makes all of the very same points this statement accuses us of not making,” the spokesperson said. 

Manfra said Monday morning, “NBC News continues to falsely report my recent comments on attempted election hacking — which clearly mirror my testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee last summer — as some kind of ‘breaking news,’ incorrectly claiming a shift in the administration’s position on cyber threats.”

“As I said eight months ago, a number of states were the target of Russian government cyber actors seeking vulnerabilities and access to U.S. election infrastructure,” she said. 

Homeland Security has maintained that most of the pre-2016 targeting efforts involved mere preparations for hacking, like scanning for vulnerabilities, and were not ultimately successful. 

Officials in both Illinois and Arizona have said that hackers tried to break into voter roles in their respective states. Hackers successfully accessed records on 200,000 Illinois voters by penetrating the state voter database. In Arizona, officials say that hackers successfully delivered malware to a county election official’s computer but that malicious actors never actually made it into the system.

Homeland Security notified all 21 states of the targeting efforts last September. Officials in some states have disputed the conclusions, saying that the evidence did not point to targeting of actual election infrastructure. 

“NBC’s irresponsible reporting, which is being roundly criticized elsewhere in the media and by security experts alike, undermines the ability of the Department of Homeland Security, our partners at the Election Assistance Commission, and state and local officials across the nation to do our incredibly important jobs,” Manfra said.

Homeland Security is providing cyber scanning and other services to state officials who request it as part of its new critical infrastructure designation for voting systems and infrastructure. The department is also working to bolster threat intelligence sharing with election officials in states across the country. 

Manfra’s statement on Monday came after the National Association of Secretaries of State, which represents a number of chief election officials, similarly criticized NBC for misleading reporting.

This post was updated at 12:56 p.m. to reflect a statement from NBC News. 

References

  1. ^ published (www.nbcnews.com)
0

Homeland Security calls NBC report on election hacking 'false …

The Department of Homeland Security on Monday pushed back against a recent NBC News report claiming that Russian hackers “successfully penetrated” U.S. voter roles before the 2016 elections, calling it misleading.

“Recent NBC reporting has misrepresented facts and confused the public with regard to Department of Homeland Security and state and local government efforts to combat election hacking,” Jeanette Manfra, the department’s chief cybersecurity official, said in a statement. 

The article published[1] by NBC last week drew on an exclusive interview with Manfra, during which she told the publication that U.S. officials observed “a targeting of 21 states and an exceptionally small number of them were actually successfully penetrated.” 

ADVERTISEMENT

Manfra’s comments echoed testimony she delivered before the Senate Intelligence Committee last June, in which she confirmed publicly that election-related systems in 21 states were targeted ahead of the election.

Citing her comments, NBC reported that Russia “successfully penetrated the voter registration rolls of several U.S. states” before the election. 

In a statement, a spokesperson for NBC defended the network’s reporting as accurate. 

“It’s hard to believe DHS actually watched or read NBC’s report. Our story is accurate, and makes all of the very same points this statement accuses us of not making,” the spokesperson said. 

Manfra said Monday morning, “NBC News continues to falsely report my recent comments on attempted election hacking — which clearly mirror my testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee last summer — as some kind of ‘breaking news,’ incorrectly claiming a shift in the administration’s position on cyber threats.”

“As I said eight months ago, a number of states were the target of Russian government cyber actors seeking vulnerabilities and access to U.S. election infrastructure,” she said. 

Homeland Security has maintained that most of the pre-2016 targeting efforts involved mere preparations for hacking, like scanning for vulnerabilities, and were not ultimately successful. 

Officials in both Illinois and Arizona have said that hackers tried to break into voter roles in their respective states. Hackers successfully accessed records on 200,000 Illinois voters by penetrating the state voter database. In Arizona, officials say that hackers successfully delivered malware to a county election official’s computer but that malicious actors never actually made it into the system.

Homeland Security notified all 21 states of the targeting efforts last September. Officials in some states have disputed the conclusions, saying that the evidence did not point to targeting of actual election infrastructure. 

“NBC’s irresponsible reporting, which is being roundly criticized elsewhere in the media and by security experts alike, undermines the ability of the Department of Homeland Security, our partners at the Election Assistance Commission, and state and local officials across the nation to do our incredibly important jobs,” Manfra said.

Homeland Security is providing cyber scanning and other services to state officials who request it as part of its new critical infrastructure designation for voting systems and infrastructure. The department is also working to bolster threat intelligence sharing with election officials in states across the country. 

Manfra’s statement on Monday came after the National Association of Secretaries of State, which represents a number of chief election officials, similarly criticized NBC for misleading reporting.

This post was updated at 12:56 p.m. to reflect a statement from NBC News. 

References

  1. ^ published (www.nbcnews.com)