Tagged: select

0

Some soldiers may not be able to handle new pace of training, Guard chief says

The head of the National Guard Bureau says he believes the increased training days with the Army National Guard 4.0[1] initiative are sustainable but predicts some soldiers might need to make changes.

Gen. Joseph Lengyel, speaking Monday at an Association of the United States Army forum, said the 4.0 initiative focuses on certain units that need to deploy faster[2].

These high-priority units[3] include heavy armored brigade combat teams and Stryker brigade combat teams.

“We are changing the operational deployment tempo and the training tempo of the Army National Guard,” Lengyel said.

Beginning this year, four brigades — instead of two — will train at combat training centers each year, according to bureau spokesman Lt. Col. Wes Parmer. By fiscal 2019, seven brigades will participate in war-fighter staff exercises and exportable CTC rotations every year.

For example, the Tennessee National Guard’s 278th Armored Brigade Combat Team will complete a rotation at Fort Irwin’s National Training Center this spring. The soldiers will deploy overseas later this summer in support of NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence mission, Parmer told Army Times via email.

Although many Guardsmen will stick to the traditional commitment of 39 training days a year, Lengyel said that’s not the case for all Guard soldiers.

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The number of days a unit trains depends on where it falls within the sustainable readiness model, Parmer said.

The sustainable readiness model for certain units has 39 days in the first year, 48 days in the second year, 60 days in the third year and 51 days in the fourth year, Lengyel said.

Select high-priority units have already transitioned to this four-year collective training cycle, Parmer said.

Lengyel said this training model should be sustainable for most Guardsmen, but he anticipates some soldiers will have to make changes.

“We’re in cycle one of this … the trick for us is to see how are we going to be able to do this in cycle two and three and beyond,” he said. “Is this sustainable? We tend to think it is, but I predict there will be some changes.”

Some soldiers’ civilian lives might not be able to tolerate the increased training, he said.

These soldiers might have to cross train to do another job that doesn’t require so many training days away from their civilian jobs and lives.

“Some of these people will be able to adapt, and they’ll do it,” he said. “As we recruit new people into the bottom of the organization, they won’t know any different, and it will be the new way the Army National Guard works.”

Lengyel said one way for Guard units to be ready faster is to increase the number of full-time support personnel.

About 16 percent of the Army National Guard is full time, and adding to that would help the Guard maintain equipment better and get more training down, he said.

“The only reason you have full-time people in the Army National Guard is to train part-time folks,” Lengyel said. “Without the full-time force there to do it, we’re not going to be able to maintain that.”

References

  1. ^ Army National Guard 4.0 (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ deploy faster (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ high-priority units (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ 3-star: More training days for the Guard as the Army struggles with readiness (www.armytimes.com)
0

Some soldiers may not be able to handle new pace of training, Guard chief says

The head of the National Guard Bureau says he believes the increased training days with the Army National Guard 4.0[1] initiative are sustainable but predicts some soldiers might need to make changes.

Gen. Joseph Lengyel, speaking Monday at an Association of the United States Army forum, said the 4.0 initiative focuses on certain units that need to deploy faster[2].

These high-priority units[3] include heavy armored brigade combat teams and Stryker brigade combat teams.

“We are changing the operational deployment tempo and the training tempo of the Army National Guard,” Lengyel said.

Beginning this year, four brigades — instead of two — will train at combat training centers each year, according to bureau spokesman Lt. Col. Wes Parmer. By fiscal 2019, seven brigades will participate in war-fighter staff exercises and exportable CTC rotations every year.

For example, the Tennessee National Guard’s 278th Armored Brigade Combat Team will complete a rotation at Fort Irwin’s National Training Center this spring. The soldiers will deploy overseas later this summer in support of NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence mission, Parmer told Army Times via email.

Although many Guardsmen will stick to the traditional commitment of 39 training days a year, Lengyel said that’s not the case for all Guard soldiers.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The number of days a unit trains depends on where it falls within the sustainable readiness model, Parmer said.

The sustainable readiness model for certain units has 39 days in the first year, 48 days in the second year, 60 days in the third year and 51 days in the fourth year, Lengyel said.

Select high-priority units have already transitioned to this four-year collective training cycle, Parmer said.

Lengyel said this training model should be sustainable for most Guardsmen, but he anticipates some soldiers will have to make changes.

“We’re in cycle one of this … the trick for us is to see how are we going to be able to do this in cycle two and three and beyond,” he said. “Is this sustainable? We tend to think it is, but I predict there will be some changes.”

Some soldiers’ civilian lives might not be able to tolerate the increased training, he said.

These soldiers might have to cross train to do another job that doesn’t require so many training days away from their civilian jobs and lives.

“Some of these people will be able to adapt, and they’ll do it,” he said. “As we recruit new people into the bottom of the organization, they won’t know any different, and it will be the new way the Army National Guard works.”

Lengyel said one way for Guard units to be ready faster is to increase the number of full-time support personnel.

About 16 percent of the Army National Guard is full time, and adding to that would help the Guard maintain equipment better and get more training down, he said.

“The only reason you have full-time people in the Army National Guard is to train part-time folks,” Lengyel said. “Without the full-time force there to do it, we’re not going to be able to maintain that.”

References

  1. ^ Army National Guard 4.0 (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ deploy faster (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ high-priority units (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ 3-star: More training days for the Guard as the Army struggles with readiness (www.armytimes.com)
0

Some soldiers may not be able to handle new pace of training, Guard chief says

The head of the National Guard Bureau says he believes the increased training days with the Army National Guard 4.0[1] initiative are sustainable but predicts some soldiers might need to make changes.

Gen. Joseph Lengyel, speaking Monday at an Association of the United States Army forum, said the 4.0 initiative focuses on certain units that need to deploy faster[2].

These high-priority units[3] include heavy armored brigade combat teams and Stryker brigade combat teams.

“We are changing the operational deployment tempo and the training tempo of the Army National Guard,” Lengyel said.

Beginning this year, four brigades — instead of two — will train at combat training centers each year, according to bureau spokesman Lt. Col. Wes Parmer. By fiscal 2019, seven brigades will participate in war-fighter staff exercises and exportable CTC rotations every year.

For example, the Tennessee National Guard’s 278th Armored Brigade Combat Team will complete a rotation at Fort Irwin’s National Training Center this spring. The soldiers will deploy overseas later this summer in support of NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence mission, Parmer told Army Times via email.

Although many Guardsmen will stick to the traditional commitment of 39 training days a year, Lengyel said that’s not the case for all Guard soldiers.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The number of days a unit trains depends on where it falls within the sustainable readiness model, Parmer said.

The sustainable readiness model for certain units has 39 days in the first year, 48 days in the second year, 60 days in the third year and 51 days in the fourth year, Lengyel said.

Select high-priority units have already transitioned to this four-year collective training cycle, Parmer said.

Lengyel said this training model should be sustainable for most Guardsmen, but he anticipates some soldiers will have to make changes.

“We’re in cycle one of this … the trick for us is to see how are we going to be able to do this in cycle two and three and beyond,” he said. “Is this sustainable? We tend to think it is, but I predict there will be some changes.”

Some soldiers’ civilian lives might not be able to tolerate the increased training, he said.

These soldiers might have to cross train to do another job that doesn’t require so many training days away from their civilian jobs and lives.

“Some of these people will be able to adapt, and they’ll do it,” he said. “As we recruit new people into the bottom of the organization, they won’t know any different, and it will be the new way the Army National Guard works.”

Lengyel said one way for Guard units to be ready faster is to increase the number of full-time support personnel.

About 16 percent of the Army National Guard is full time, and adding to that would help the Guard maintain equipment better and get more training down, he said.

“The only reason you have full-time people in the Army National Guard is to train part-time folks,” Lengyel said. “Without the full-time force there to do it, we’re not going to be able to maintain that.”

References

  1. ^ Army National Guard 4.0 (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ deploy faster (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ high-priority units (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ 3-star: More training days for the Guard as the Army struggles with readiness (www.armytimes.com)
0

Some soldiers may not be able to handle new pace of training, Guard chief says

The head of the National Guard Bureau says he believes the increased training days with the Army National Guard 4.0[1] initiative are sustainable but predicts some soldiers might need to make changes.

Gen. Joseph Lengyel, speaking Monday at an Association of the United States Army forum, said the 4.0 initiative focuses on certain units that need to deploy faster[2].

These high-priority units[3] include heavy armored brigade combat teams and Stryker brigade combat teams.

“We are changing the operational deployment tempo and the training tempo of the Army National Guard,” Lengyel said.

Beginning this year, four brigades — instead of two — will train at combat training centers each year, according to bureau spokesman Lt. Col. Wes Parmer. By fiscal 2019, seven brigades will participate in war-fighter staff exercises and exportable CTC rotations every year.

For example, the Tennessee National Guard’s 278th Armored Brigade Combat Team will complete a rotation at Fort Irwin’s National Training Center this spring. The soldiers will deploy overseas later this summer in support of NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence mission, Parmer told Army Times via email.

Although many Guardsmen will stick to the traditional commitment of 39 training days a year, Lengyel said that’s not the case for all Guard soldiers.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The number of days a unit trains depends on where it falls within the sustainable readiness model, Parmer said.

The sustainable readiness model for certain units has 39 days in the first year, 48 days in the second year, 60 days in the third year and 51 days in the fourth year, Lengyel said.

Select high-priority units have already transitioned to this four-year collective training cycle, Parmer said.

Lengyel said this training model should be sustainable for most Guardsmen, but he anticipates some soldiers will have to make changes.

“We’re in cycle one of this … the trick for us is to see how are we going to be able to do this in cycle two and three and beyond,” he said. “Is this sustainable? We tend to think it is, but I predict there will be some changes.”

Some soldiers’ civilian lives might not be able to tolerate the increased training, he said.

These soldiers might have to cross train to do another job that doesn’t require so many training days away from their civilian jobs and lives.

“Some of these people will be able to adapt, and they’ll do it,” he said. “As we recruit new people into the bottom of the organization, they won’t know any different, and it will be the new way the Army National Guard works.”

Lengyel said one way for Guard units to be ready faster is to increase the number of full-time support personnel.

About 16 percent of the Army National Guard is full time, and adding to that would help the Guard maintain equipment better and get more training down, he said.

“The only reason you have full-time people in the Army National Guard is to train part-time folks,” Lengyel said. “Without the full-time force there to do it, we’re not going to be able to maintain that.”

References

  1. ^ Army National Guard 4.0 (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ deploy faster (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ high-priority units (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ 3-star: More training days for the Guard as the Army struggles with readiness (www.armytimes.com)
0

Some soldiers may not be able to handle new pace of training, Guard chief says

The head of the National Guard Bureau says he believes the increased training days with the Army National Guard 4.0[1] initiative are sustainable but predicts some soldiers might need to make changes.

Gen. Joseph Lengyel, speaking Monday at an Association of the United States Army forum, said the 4.0 initiative focuses on certain units that need to deploy faster[2].

These high-priority units[3] include heavy armored brigade combat teams and Stryker brigade combat teams.

“We are changing the operational deployment tempo and the training tempo of the Army National Guard,” Lengyel said.

Beginning this year, four brigades — instead of two — will train at combat training centers each year, according to bureau spokesman Lt. Col. Wes Parmer. By fiscal 2019, seven brigades will participate in war-fighter staff exercises and exportable CTC rotations every year.

For example, the Tennessee National Guard’s 278th Armored Brigade Combat Team will complete a rotation at Fort Irwin’s National Training Center this spring. The soldiers will deploy overseas later this summer in support of NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence mission, Parmer told Army Times via email.

Although many Guardsmen will stick to the traditional commitment of 39 training days a year, Lengyel said that’s not the case for all Guard soldiers.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The number of days a unit trains depends on where it falls within the sustainable readiness model, Parmer said.

The sustainable readiness model for certain units has 39 days in the first year, 48 days in the second year, 60 days in the third year and 51 days in the fourth year, Lengyel said.

Select high-priority units have already transitioned to this four-year collective training cycle, Parmer said.

Lengyel said this training model should be sustainable for most Guardsmen, but he anticipates some soldiers will have to make changes.

“We’re in cycle one of this … the trick for us is to see how are we going to be able to do this in cycle two and three and beyond,” he said. “Is this sustainable? We tend to think it is, but I predict there will be some changes.”

Some soldiers’ civilian lives might not be able to tolerate the increased training, he said.

These soldiers might have to cross train to do another job that doesn’t require so many training days away from their civilian jobs and lives.

“Some of these people will be able to adapt, and they’ll do it,” he said. “As we recruit new people into the bottom of the organization, they won’t know any different, and it will be the new way the Army National Guard works.”

Lengyel said one way for Guard units to be ready faster is to increase the number of full-time support personnel.

About 16 percent of the Army National Guard is full time, and adding to that would help the Guard maintain equipment better and get more training down, he said.

“The only reason you have full-time people in the Army National Guard is to train part-time folks,” Lengyel said. “Without the full-time force there to do it, we’re not going to be able to maintain that.”

References

  1. ^ Army National Guard 4.0 (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ deploy faster (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ high-priority units (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ 3-star: More training days for the Guard as the Army struggles with readiness (www.armytimes.com)
0

Peraton Hires President For Homeland Security Sector

John Coleman, Peraton

Peraton[1] has hired John Coleman, recently a president with OMNIPLEX World Services, to lead its homeland security sector, effective March 5, 2018.

Coleman brings more than two decades’ experience to the role, and will be responsible for a Peraton division that provides technology integration, engineering, logistics and mission support services to customers throughout the departments of Homeland Security, State and other select federal civilian agencies, the company said.

Peraton’s work includes support for the Transportation Security Administration’s Integrated Logistics Support program and the Customs and Border Protection’s Tethered Aerostat Radar System, or TARS.

Peraton President and CEO Stu Shea said the hire strengthens a core market for Peraton.

“John’s extensive experience in program management, business management, and customer relations will be an asset to the company as we work diligently to support current and future homeland security customer missions,” Shea said.

Before joining Peraton, Coleman was president of OMNIPLEX World Services’ international investigations unit, managing a team of more than 2,000 cleared employees and contractors and overseeing key senior customer relationships. Coleman previously was vice president of PAE National Security Solutions’ information and mission solutions business area, where he was responsible for a portfolio that primarily focused on DHS and Justice Department customers.  He has also worked for Northrop Grumman Corp. and FCi Federal.

Peraton’s current health programs in the Veterans Affairs Department, the Defense Health Agency and other agencies will remain within its homeland security sector, the company said.

The government IT services company was part of Harris Corp. before acquired by Veritas in April 2017 and rebranded as Peraton. The company has named several new senior executives since its rebranding, including a chief technology officer[2], chief financial officer,[3] chief security officer[4]chief human resources officer[5]chief communications officer[6] and president of its newly formed Space, Intelligence and Cyber[7] sector.

References

  1. ^ Peraton (www.peraton.com)
  2. ^ chief technology officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  3. ^ chief financial officer, (www.washingtonexec.com)
  4. ^ chief security officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  5. ^ chief human resources officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  6. ^ chief communications officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  7. ^ president of its newly formed Space, Intelligence and Cyber (www.washingtonexec.com)
0

Peraton Hires President For Homeland Security Sector …

John Coleman, Peraton

Peraton[1] has hired John Coleman, recently a president with OMNIPLEX World Services, to lead its homeland security sector, effective March 5, 2018.

Coleman brings more than two decades’ experience to the role, and will be responsible for a Peraton division that provides technology integration, engineering, logistics and mission support services to customers throughout the departments of Homeland Security, State and other select federal civilian agencies, the company said.

Peraton’s work includes support for the Transportation Security Administration’s Integrated Logistics Support program and the Customs and Border Protection’s Tethered Aerostat Radar System, or TARS.

Peraton President and CEO Stu Shea said the hire strengthens a core market for Peraton.

“John’s extensive experience in program management, business management, and customer relations will be an asset to the company as we work diligently to support current and future homeland security customer missions,” Shea said.

Before joining Peraton, Coleman was president of OMNIPLEX World Services’ international investigations unit, managing a team of more than 2,000 cleared employees and contractors and overseeing key senior customer relationships. Coleman previously was vice president of PAE National Security Solutions’ information and mission solutions business area, where he was responsible for a portfolio that primarily focused on DHS and Justice Department customers.  He has also worked for Northrop Grumman Corp. and FCi Federal.

Peraton’s current health programs in the Veterans Affairs Department, the Defense Health Agency and other agencies will remain within its homeland security sector, the company said.

The government IT services company was part of Harris Corp. before acquired by Veritas in April 2017 and rebranded as Peraton. The company has named several new senior executives since its rebranding, including a chief technology officer[2], chief financial officer,[3] chief security officer[4]chief human resources officer[5]chief communications officer[6] and president of its newly formed Space, Intelligence and Cyber[7] sector.

See How Capitals Tickets Can Drive Business With a Pair of Complimentary Tickets

References

  1. ^ Peraton (www.peraton.com)
  2. ^ chief technology officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  3. ^ chief financial officer, (www.washingtonexec.com)
  4. ^ chief security officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  5. ^ chief human resources officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  6. ^ chief communications officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  7. ^ president of its newly formed Space, Intelligence and Cyber (www.washingtonexec.com)
0

Peraton Hires President For Homeland Security Sector …

John Coleman, Peraton

Peraton[1] has hired John Coleman, recently a president with OMNIPLEX World Services, to lead its homeland security sector, effective March 5, 2018.

Coleman brings more than two decades’ experience to the role, and will be responsible for a Peraton division that provides technology integration, engineering, logistics and mission support services to customers throughout the departments of Homeland Security, State and other select federal civilian agencies, the company said.

Peraton’s work includes support for the Transportation Security Administration’s Integrated Logistics Support program and the Customs and Border Protection’s Tethered Aerostat Radar System, or TARS.

Peraton President and CEO Stu Shea said the hire strengthens a core market for Peraton.

“John’s extensive experience in program management, business management, and customer relations will be an asset to the company as we work diligently to support current and future homeland security customer missions,” Shea said.

Before joining Peraton, Coleman was president of OMNIPLEX World Services’ international investigations unit, managing a team of more than 2,000 cleared employees and contractors and overseeing key senior customer relationships. Coleman previously was vice president of PAE National Security Solutions’ information and mission solutions business area, where he was responsible for a portfolio that primarily focused on DHS and Justice Department customers.  He has also worked for Northrop Grumman Corp. and FCi Federal.

Peraton’s current health programs in the Veterans Affairs Department, the Defense Health Agency and other agencies will remain within its homeland security sector, the company said.

The government IT services company was part of Harris Corp. before acquired by Veritas in April 2017 and rebranded as Peraton. The company has named several new senior executives since its rebranding, including a chief technology officer[2], chief financial officer,[3] chief security officer[4]chief human resources officer[5]chief communications officer[6] and president of its newly formed Space, Intelligence and Cyber[7] sector.

See How Capitals Tickets Can Drive Business With a Pair of Complimentary Tickets

References

  1. ^ Peraton (www.peraton.com)
  2. ^ chief technology officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  3. ^ chief financial officer, (www.washingtonexec.com)
  4. ^ chief security officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  5. ^ chief human resources officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  6. ^ chief communications officer (www.washingtonexec.com)
  7. ^ president of its newly formed Space, Intelligence and Cyber (www.washingtonexec.com)
0

Peraton Appoints John Coleman as President of Its Homeland Security Sector

HERNDON, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE[1])–Peraton has announced the appointment of John Coleman as president of its Homeland Security sector, effective March 5, 2018.

Bringing more than two decades of experience to the role, Coleman will have executive responsibility for the sector’s overall growth strategy and program execution. The Homeland Security sector provides industry-leading technology integration, engineering, logistics, and mission support services to customers throughout the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Department of State and other select federal civilian agencies. Key programs include the Transportation Security Administration’s Integrated Logistics Support program and the Customs and Border Protection agency’s Tethered Aerostat Radar System (TARS).

Peraton’s current health programs in the Department of Veteran’s Affairs, Defense Health, and other agencies will remain within this sector.

Speaking about Coleman’s appointment, Peraton’s president and CEO, Stu Shea, said, “Homeland security represents a core market for Peraton and we are extremely excited to have someone of John’s caliber and background lead this sector.” Shea continued, “John’s extensive experience in program management, business management, and customer relations will be an asset to the company as we work diligently to support current and future homeland security customer missions.”

Coleman joins Peraton from OMNIPLEX World Services where he served as president of its OMNISEC International Investigations unit. OMNISEC provides background investigation services for Intelligence Community and federal civilian agencies. There he managed a team of more than 2,000 cleared employees and contractors and was responsible for establishing strong senior customer relationships and improving program performance.

Prior to his role at OMNIPLEX, he was vice president of the Information and Mission Solutions business area of PAE National Security Solutions where he had responsibility for a portfolio primarily focused on DHS and Department of Justice customers.

Earlier in his career, he served in a variety of senior P&L, program, and business management roles, including vice president, Service Center Operations division at the former FCi Federal, Inc. and program director, USCIS Application Support Center Contract with Northrop Grumman’s former Technical Services sector.

Coleman earned his MBA and a bachelor’s of science degree in management from Clemson University and is a recognized industry leader in program start-ups and transitions, business management, and pricing expertise.

About Peraton

Peraton provides innovative, reliable solutions to the nation’s most sensitive and mission-critical programs and systems. As a trusted provider of highly differentiated space, intelligence, cyber/SIGINT, defense, electronic warfare, homeland security, and secure communications capabilities, Peraton is a critical partner to the Intelligence Community, Department of Defense, and select federal agencies and commercial entities. Headquartered in Herndon, Virginia, the company employs approximately 3,500 people across the U.S. and Canada.

References

  1. ^ BUSINESS WIRE (www.businesswire.com)
0

Peraton Appoints John Coleman as President of Its Homeland Security Sector

HERNDON, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE[1])–Peraton has announced the appointment of John Coleman as president of its Homeland Security sector, effective March 5, 2018.

Bringing more than two decades of experience to the role, Coleman will have executive responsibility for the sector’s overall growth strategy and program execution. The Homeland Security sector provides industry-leading technology integration, engineering, logistics, and mission support services to customers throughout the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Department of State and other select federal civilian agencies. Key programs include the Transportation Security Administration’s Integrated Logistics Support program and the Customs and Border Protection agency’s Tethered Aerostat Radar System (TARS).

Peraton’s current health programs in the Department of Veteran’s Affairs, Defense Health, and other agencies will remain within this sector.

Speaking about Coleman’s appointment, Peraton’s president and CEO, Stu Shea, said, “Homeland security represents a core market for Peraton and we are extremely excited to have someone of John’s caliber and background lead this sector.” Shea continued, “John’s extensive experience in program management, business management, and customer relations will be an asset to the company as we work diligently to support current and future homeland security customer missions.”

Coleman joins Peraton from OMNIPLEX World Services where he served as president of its OMNISEC International Investigations unit. OMNISEC provides background investigation services for Intelligence Community and federal civilian agencies. There he managed a team of more than 2,000 cleared employees and contractors and was responsible for establishing strong senior customer relationships and improving program performance.

Prior to his role at OMNIPLEX, he was vice president of the Information and Mission Solutions business area of PAE National Security Solutions where he had responsibility for a portfolio primarily focused on DHS and Department of Justice customers.

Earlier in his career, he served in a variety of senior P&L, program, and business management roles, including vice president, Service Center Operations division at the former FCi Federal, Inc. and program director, USCIS Application Support Center Contract with Northrop Grumman’s former Technical Services sector.

Coleman earned his MBA and a bachelor’s of science degree in management from Clemson University and is a recognized industry leader in program start-ups and transitions, business management, and pricing expertise.

About Peraton

Peraton provides innovative, reliable solutions to the nation’s most sensitive and mission-critical programs and systems. As a trusted provider of highly differentiated space, intelligence, cyber/SIGINT, defense, electronic warfare, homeland security, and secure communications capabilities, Peraton is a critical partner to the Intelligence Community, Department of Defense, and select federal agencies and commercial entities. Headquartered in Herndon, Virginia, the company employs approximately 3,500 people across the U.S. and Canada.

References

  1. ^ BUSINESS WIRE (www.businesswire.com)