Tagged: security

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Israeli military investigating Palestinian's death in West Bank confrontation

JERUSALEM (Reuters) – A Palestinian man died after a confrontation with Israeli troops in the occupied West Bank on Thursday that the Palestinian Authority condemned as a “cold-blooded execution”.

The Israeli military said the man had attempted to attack troops and that it was investigating the incident.

In security camera footage posted on social media and carried by Israeli news sites, soldiers could be seen kicking and striking a man, identified by Palestinian officials as Yassin Omar Serda, after detaining him in the town of Jericho.

In a statement, the military said the man was armed with an iron rod and ran toward the soldiers in an attempt to strike them. The troops, it said, were on a raid to arrest “suspects” in the town.

“In response to the immediate threat, the troops fired toward the assailant and confronted him from close range and were able to stop him,” the military said.

“A knife was also found in his possession. Troops evacuated him to a hospital to receive medical treatment. His death was later announced. The incident is being reviewed.”

The Palestinian Information Ministry said about 20 soldiers had administered a “heavy beating” to Serda, especially on his stomach and back.

“The Information Ministry views (his) martyrdom … shortly after his arrest a cold-blooded execution,” it said.

Serda’s family said it was seeking to have an autopsy performed.

Israeli troops frequently mount raids in the West Bank to detain suspected militants. Israel captured the territory in the 1967 Middle East war. Palestinians seek to establish a state in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, with East Jerusalem as its capital.

An Israeli soldier, Elor Azaria, was sentenced last February to 18 months imprisonment for killing a wounded and incapacitated Palestinian assailant in the West Bank town of Hebron in 2015. He was convicted of manslaughter, a crime that carries a maximum sentence of 20 years.

His trial was one of the most divisive in Israeli history. Supporters argued he was justified in shooting a Palestinian whom they said had intended to kill Israelis. The military said he violated standing orders and that his conduct was unbecoming of an Israeli soldier.

Writing by Jeffrey Heller; Additional reporting by Ori Lewis, Mustafa Abu Ganayeh and Ali Sawafta; Editing by Janet Lawrence

References

  1. ^ The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. (thomsonreuters.com)
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Mattis faces deadline today on the military's transgender policy

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis faced a Wednesday deadline[1] to provide President Donald Trump guidance on transgender service members, as news reports surfaced revealing that the president initiated the ban last summer without consulting his top general.

“Things are at a very confusing moment right now,” said Shannon Minter, who is representing transgender personnel in two of the four federal lawsuits[2] challenging Trump’s ban.

“When President Trump issued his official memorandum[3] [in August of 2017] he ordered Mattis in that memo to provide the president with a written plan on how to implement the plan by Feb 21. So we’ve all been waiting, It’s obviously an important recommendation on exactly how the plan would be implemented.”

Mattis was directed to have the Pentagon study whether transgender personnel negatively impacted readiness and provide the White House guidance on whether Trump’s July ban should be reversed.

“The Secretary of Defense, after consulting with the Secretary of Homeland Security, may advise me at any time, in writing, that a change to this policy is warranted,” Trump said in the August 2017 memo.
[4]

As of midday Wednesday the Pentagon had not issued guidance, said Pentagon spokesman Army Maj. David Eastburn.

“The secretary has his recommendation for the President but has not provided it yet. When he’s ready to provide it, he will,” Eastburn said.

The guidance is not expected to be made public, several defense officials told Military Times.

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It was not clear if on that date the White House would also make Mattis’ February recommendations public. In addition, parts of Trump’s August directive have already been overturned in the courts, further muddying what exactly the transgender policy will be.

In the August memo, Trump also directed that no new transgender recruits be allowed to enlist in the military, upending earlier direction from Mattis that set a six-month delay that expired Jan. 1. Multiple federal courts have also ruled against that limitation, and transgender personnel were allowed to join the military as of Jan. 1, 2018.

In a statement issued in late December as the Jan. 1 ban expired, the Justice Department pointed to the anticipated guidance, supported by a study Mattis directed last August, as reason not to further pursue that angle of the ban.
[6]

The courts are still weighing in on the wider issue of whether any restrictions on transgender service are constitutional. In the two federal cases that Minter is involved with, administration attorneys have pointed to the anticipated policy from Mattis as a reason for delay. The cases are also in a heated discovery phase where attorneys for the transgender plaintiffs are trying to determine on what basis Trump made his July decision, and in consultation with whom.

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

On Wednesday BuzzFeed reported on emails it obtained that it said showed that Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Gen. Joseph Dunford was not consulted and caught off guard by the tweet, In subsequent memos to service members and in Congressional testimony Dunford has repeatedly said[7] “any individual who meets the physical and mental standards … should be afforded the opportunity to continue to serve.”

Dunford spokesman Air Force Col. Pat Ryder would not confirm whether the emails BuzzFeed obtained were authentic, stating that “because there is ongoing litigation regarding DoD policy on transgender accessions, it would be inappropriate for us to comment at this time on questions related to actual or alleged internal DoD correspondence.”

Meanwhile, the first new transgender recruits are getting closer to enlisting, Minter said. Nicolas Talbott,[8] 24, is one of the plaintiffs Minter is representing. Talbott has completed all of the medical paperwork necessary, including verification that he has had 18 months of stability after transitioning to a male.

“Next step is to schedule the MEPS,” Minter said.

References

  1. ^ Wednesday deadline (www.militarytimes.com)
  2. ^ in two of the four federal lawsuits (www.militarytimes.com)
  3. ^ official memorandum (www.militarytimes.com)
  4. ^ Trump said in the August 2017 memo. (www.whitehouse.gov)
  5. ^ This young man is transgender, and ready to enlist Jan. 1 (www.militarytimes.com)
  6. ^ Mattis directed last August, (www.militarytimes.com)
  7. ^ Dunford has repeatedly said (www.militarytimes.com)
  8. ^ Nicolas Talbott, (www.militarytimes.com)
0

Mattis faces deadline today on the military's transgender policy

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis faced a Wednesday deadline[1] to provide President Donald Trump guidance on transgender service members, as news reports surfaced revealing that the president initiated the ban last summer without consulting his top general.

“Things are at a very confusing moment right now,” said Shannon Minter, who is representing transgender personnel in two of the four federal lawsuits[2] challenging Trump’s ban.

“When President Trump issued his official memorandum[3] [in August of 2017] he ordered Mattis in that memo to provide the president with a written plan on how to implement the plan by Feb 21. So we’ve all been waiting, It’s obviously an important recommendation on exactly how the plan would be implemented.”

Mattis was directed to have the Pentagon study whether transgender personnel negatively impacted readiness and provide the White House guidance on whether Trump’s July ban should be reversed.

“The Secretary of Defense, after consulting with the Secretary of Homeland Security, may advise me at any time, in writing, that a change to this policy is warranted,” Trump said in the August 2017 memo.
[4]

As of midday Wednesday the Pentagon had not issued guidance, said Pentagon spokesman Army Maj. David Eastburn.

“The secretary has his recommendation for the President but has not provided it yet. When he’s ready to provide it, he will,” Eastburn said.

The guidance is not expected to be made public, several defense officials told Military Times.

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It was not clear if on that date the White House would also make Mattis’ February recommendations public. In addition, parts of Trump’s August directive have already been overturned in the courts, further muddying what exactly the transgender policy will be.

In the August memo, Trump also directed that no new transgender recruits be allowed to enlist in the military, upending earlier direction from Mattis that set a six-month delay that expired Jan. 1. Multiple federal courts have also ruled against that limitation, and transgender personnel were allowed to join the military as of Jan. 1, 2018.

In a statement issued in late December as the Jan. 1 ban expired, the Justice Department pointed to the anticipated guidance, supported by a study Mattis directed last August, as reason not to further pursue that angle of the ban.
[6]

The courts are still weighing in on the wider issue of whether any restrictions on transgender service are constitutional. In the two federal cases that Minter is involved with, administration attorneys have pointed to the anticipated policy from Mattis as a reason for delay. The cases are also in a heated discovery phase where attorneys for the transgender plaintiffs are trying to determine on what basis Trump made his July decision, and in consultation with whom.

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

On Wednesday BuzzFeed reported on emails it obtained that it said showed that Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Gen. Joseph Dunford was not consulted and caught off guard by the tweet, In subsequent memos to service members and in Congressional testimony Dunford has repeatedly said[7] “any individual who meets the physical and mental standards … should be afforded the opportunity to continue to serve.”

Dunford spokesman Air Force Col. Pat Ryder would not confirm whether the emails BuzzFeed obtained were authentic, stating that “because there is ongoing litigation regarding DoD policy on transgender accessions, it would be inappropriate for us to comment at this time on questions related to actual or alleged internal DoD correspondence.”

Meanwhile, the first new transgender recruits are getting closer to enlisting, Minter said. Nicolas Talbott,[8] 24, is one of the plaintiffs Minter is representing. Talbott has completed all of the medical paperwork necessary, including verification that he has had 18 months of stability after transitioning to a male.

“Next step is to schedule the MEPS,” Minter said.

References

  1. ^ Wednesday deadline (www.militarytimes.com)
  2. ^ in two of the four federal lawsuits (www.militarytimes.com)
  3. ^ official memorandum (www.militarytimes.com)
  4. ^ Trump said in the August 2017 memo. (www.whitehouse.gov)
  5. ^ This young man is transgender, and ready to enlist Jan. 1 (www.militarytimes.com)
  6. ^ Mattis directed last August, (www.militarytimes.com)
  7. ^ Dunford has repeatedly said (www.militarytimes.com)
  8. ^ Nicolas Talbott, (www.militarytimes.com)
0

Mattis faces deadline today on the military's transgender policy

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis faced a Wednesday deadline[1] to provide President Donald Trump guidance on transgender service members, as news reports surfaced revealing that the president initiated the ban last summer without consulting his top general.

“Things are at a very confusing moment right now,” said Shannon Minter, who is representing transgender personnel in two of the four federal lawsuits[2] challenging Trump’s ban.

“When President Trump issued his official memorandum[3] [in August of 2017] he ordered Mattis in that memo to provide the president with a written plan on how to implement the plan by Feb 21. So we’ve all been waiting, It’s obviously an important recommendation on exactly how the plan would be implemented.”

Mattis was directed to have the Pentagon study whether transgender personnel negatively impacted readiness and provide the White House guidance on whether Trump’s July ban should be reversed.

“The Secretary of Defense, after consulting with the Secretary of Homeland Security, may advise me at any time, in writing, that a change to this policy is warranted,” Trump said in the August 2017 memo.
[4]

As of midday Wednesday the Pentagon had not issued guidance, said Pentagon spokesman Army Maj. David Eastburn.

“The secretary has his recommendation for the President but has not provided it yet. When he’s ready to provide it, he will,” Eastburn said.

The guidance is not expected to be made public, several defense officials told Military Times.

Sign up for the Good News
All positive stories about the military
Thanks for signing up!

It was not clear if on that date the White House would also make Mattis’ February recommendations public. In addition, parts of Trump’s August directive have already been overturned in the courts, further muddying what exactly the transgender policy will be.

In the August memo, Trump also directed that no new transgender recruits be allowed to enlist in the military, upending earlier direction from Mattis that set a six-month delay that expired Jan. 1. Multiple federal courts have also ruled against that limitation, and transgender personnel were allowed to join the military as of Jan. 1, 2018.

In a statement issued in late December as the Jan. 1 ban expired, the Justice Department pointed to the anticipated guidance, supported by a study Mattis directed last August, as reason not to further pursue that angle of the ban.
[6]

The courts are still weighing in on the wider issue of whether any restrictions on transgender service are constitutional. In the two federal cases that Minter is involved with, administration attorneys have pointed to the anticipated policy from Mattis as a reason for delay. The cases are also in a heated discovery phase where attorneys for the transgender plaintiffs are trying to determine on what basis Trump made his July decision, and in consultation with whom.

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

On Wednesday BuzzFeed reported on emails it obtained that it said showed that Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Gen. Joseph Dunford was not consulted and caught off guard by the tweet, In subsequent memos to service members and in Congressional testimony Dunford has repeatedly said[7] “any individual who meets the physical and mental standards … should be afforded the opportunity to continue to serve.”

Dunford spokesman Air Force Col. Pat Ryder would not confirm whether the emails BuzzFeed obtained were authentic, stating that “because there is ongoing litigation regarding DoD policy on transgender accessions, it would be inappropriate for us to comment at this time on questions related to actual or alleged internal DoD correspondence.”

Meanwhile, the first new transgender recruits are getting closer to enlisting, Minter said. Nicolas Talbott,[8] 24, is one of the plaintiffs Minter is representing. Talbott has completed all of the medical paperwork necessary, including verification that he has had 18 months of stability after transitioning to a male.

“Next step is to schedule the MEPS,” Minter said.

References

  1. ^ Wednesday deadline (www.militarytimes.com)
  2. ^ in two of the four federal lawsuits (www.militarytimes.com)
  3. ^ official memorandum (www.militarytimes.com)
  4. ^ Trump said in the August 2017 memo. (www.whitehouse.gov)
  5. ^ This young man is transgender, and ready to enlist Jan. 1 (www.militarytimes.com)
  6. ^ Mattis directed last August, (www.militarytimes.com)
  7. ^ Dunford has repeatedly said (www.militarytimes.com)
  8. ^ Nicolas Talbott, (www.militarytimes.com)
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$500000 found during traffic stop, Homeland Security investigating

YORK COUNTY – Nearly half a million dollars smeared with yellow mustard was discovered during a traffic stop in York County, leading to a Homeland Security investigation.

The York County Sheriff’s Office said a deputy pulled over an eastbound vehicle near Mile Marker 348 on Feb. 18.

The deputy felt something was suspicious during the stop, and asked the driver to search the car. Permission was granted, and a suitcase full of wrapped money smeared with yellow mustard was discovered. The total currency found is estimated at $490,000.

After seizing the money, a K9 indicated the cash had a strong odor of drugs.

The York County Sheriff’s Office said the case is now being investigated by Homeland Security, and the money was most likely headed to the Chicago area.

The suspect’s name is not being released.