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2nd ABCT, 3rd ID, wins Sullivan Cup tank competition at Fort Benning

The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
1 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
2 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
3 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
4 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
5 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]

FORT BENNING, Ga. — The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.

After several days of competition, the tank crews performed one final timed event May 4.

Staggered by their points placement on the morning of the last day, the tank crews ran a 1.7-mile route to Brave Rifles Field the morning of May 4. On the field, the crewmembers performed several tank-related physical and mental tasks. Crewmembers also completed five burpees between each station, and there was a five-burpee penalty for incorrect responses and failures on tasks.

After the completion of the final competitive event, tallies were made of the scores from throughout the competition. The top finishers in the Sullivan Cup were:

– 1st place: B Company, 3rd Battalion, 67th Armored Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, from Fort Stewart, Georgia
– 2nd place: C Company, 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division from Fort Riley, Kansas
– 3rd place: 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division from Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

Brig. Gen. David A. Lesperance, commandant of the U.S. Army Armor School at the Maneuver Center of Excellence, spoke at the competition’s closing ceremony.

“Never in my wildest imagination would I have guessed that it would have delivered what it did for army today,” said Lesperance. “They truly have identified the best tank crew and tank crews the Army has to offer today.”

The first day of competition included a stress shoot adapted specifically for tank crews and a ranked simulated combat maneuver exercise. On the second two days, the crews conducted a live-fire exercise and a situational training exercise. The scored events were meant to represent both what tank crews trained on and what they could expect in combat.

“What do we expect of a tank crew in our army today?” Lesperance asked rhetorically during the closing ceremony. “We expect that tank crew to be able to survive, maneuver to a point of positional advantage, to get our weapons into the fight and to deliver first-round lethality and have an effect on our target and have our target destroyed.”

Staff Sgt. Johnathan Werner, tank commander, Cpl. Justin Harris, gunner, Pvt. Brandon Zacher, loader, and Pvt. Dekken Sanders, driver, the winning tank crew from 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID, had only worked together for a few months before joining the competition.

“It’s pretty intense for the past roughly three months, but we gave it our all,” said Harris.

Werner described the competition as “fierce.”

“This is stuff that we do on a day-to-day basis — tanker grade gunnery, maneuvering — this is our job,” said Werner. “But when you put everyone in one area, the best of the best you possibly in the entire world, and then you compete and you have a bunch of alpha males, it kind of speaks for itself.”

Werner echoed Lesperance’s belief in the real-life use of the training they received during the competition.

“The way they facilitated the training, just by the book, the way they did the props for the gunnery, the way they did the STX training and the stress shoot, it was a little more realistic for combat engagement,” said Werner. “We should be able to take that back to the units and implement that on a lower level, not necessarily just for competitors. But if we can do this worldwide and have the worldwide training, the way the Army can, it’s what we really need to work toward.”

Both Zacher and Sanders, who have been in the Army for less than a year, found it strange to return to Fort Benning after finishing their basic training here. Sanders described the experience as “surreal.” Zacher appreciated seeing his trainers.

“It’s been pretty great seeing some of our old drill sergeants and shaking their hands,” said Zacher. “They’ve been rooting for us, so it feels great.”

To see photos from the 2018 Sullivan Cup, visit “Photo Album” in the “Related Links” section on this page.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
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Face of Defense: Guardsman Takes Army Values to Heart


ARLINGTON, Va. —

An infantryman with the South Carolina Army National Guard’s Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 118th Infantry Regiment, takes the Army values to heart. [1]

“We’re supporting the mission on the ground and making that difference,” said Army Sgt. Stephen Caldwell, adding that he loves being a part of a larger team.

“Being a fire team leader, providing fire superiority and taking over the objectives — it’s an adrenaline rush to say the least,” he said.

Monitoring Threats

In his civilian job, Caldwell is a watch analyst with the Department of Homeland Security. In that capacity, he monitors potential national threats that could pose harm to physical structures, cyber networks and the environment.[2]

“We have situational awareness on pretty much anything,” he said.

And, regarding his infantry duties, Caldwell said good radio communications provide a tactical edge for his unit.

“It’s communication that makes everything run and I love the challenge,” he said, adding the radio makes him feel like a double threat on the battlefield.

“A single radio has the power to change the outcome of an engagement,” Caldwell said.

Before working at DHS, he spent four years working at the South Carolina Emergency Management Division’s joint operations center. The experience there laid the groundwork for his current DHS job, Caldwell said.

“It gave me an understanding of what affects critical infrastructures,” he said. “Just seeing it from a technical standpoint helped me understand what is needed at the national level with DHS, as far as the cause and effect of things.”

Caldwell said he has also found crossovers from the military side, as well.

Communication

“Great communication is key when a situation is developing and when you need to put something out to leadership so they can make a judgment call,” he said. “Camaraderie is a big thing on our teams, and it keeps me motivated when taking on a new task.”

Whether he is in his civilian or military role, Caldwell said he likes to learn and grow, making it a point to move laterally within DHS and absorb all the new information he can along the way.

“Complacency kills, so I take the time in learning new things outside of my normal skill set,” he said. “It makes for more excitement on a daily basis.”

That eagerness to learn — along with being highly competent and having a strong commitment to the homeland security mission — makes Caldwell an asset, said Matt Vaughn, a program manager in the section where Caldwell works at DHS.

“He’s a real go-getter, and you never have to tell him [to execute a task] twice,” Vaughn said. “He gets it. He does it, and it’s always done well.”

Training, Teamwork

While Caldwell said training and teamwork have been the backbone of his success with the South Carolina Army National Guard and the DHS, he is furthering his personal and professional growth by attending school for intelligence studies at the American Military University.

“Education helps me relay my thoughts in a productive way, helping me better connect with soldiers,” he said.

But education has not been the only source of learning for Caldwell.

He was a self-described “gung-ho kid” when he deployed to Afghanistan in 2007 with the South Carolina Army National Guard’s 218th Infantry Brigade Combat Team. He said the experience of working with his fellow soldiers in a deployed environment taught him the importance of thinking in a more critical and tempered way.

“I learned that even though you can’t control everything, you still have to remain mission focused,” Caldwell said. Following that mindset, he added, requires not making “emotional decisions.”

He said he tells new soldiers that taking on new tasks will help them stand out – such as becoming a “double threat” by learning the ins and outs of radio communication.

“Always be willing to learn something new,” Caldwell said. “Once you start to do that you fall into a pattern as that soldier with a can-do attitude.”

References

  1. ^ South Carolina Army National Guard (www.scguard.com)
  2. ^ Department of Homeland Security (www.dhs.gov)
0

Face of Defense: Guardsman Takes Army Values to Heart


ARLINGTON, Va. —

An infantryman with the South Carolina Army National Guard’s Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 118th Infantry Regiment, takes the Army values to heart. [1]

“We’re supporting the mission on the ground and making that difference,” said Army Sgt. Stephen Caldwell, adding that he loves being a part of a larger team.

“Being a fire team leader, providing fire superiority and taking over the objectives — it’s an adrenaline rush to say the least,” he said.

Monitoring Threats

In his civilian job, Caldwell is a watch analyst with the Department of Homeland Security. In that capacity, he monitors potential national threats that could pose harm to physical structures, cyber networks and the environment.[2]

“We have situational awareness on pretty much anything,” he said.

And, regarding his infantry duties, Caldwell said good radio communications provide a tactical edge for his unit.

“It’s communication that makes everything run and I love the challenge,” he said, adding the radio makes him feel like a double threat on the battlefield.

“A single radio has the power to change the outcome of an engagement,” Caldwell said.

Before working at DHS, he spent four years working at the South Carolina Emergency Management Division’s joint operations center. The experience there laid the groundwork for his current DHS job, Caldwell said.

“It gave me an understanding of what affects critical infrastructures,” he said. “Just seeing it from a technical standpoint helped me understand what is needed at the national level with DHS, as far as the cause and effect of things.”

Caldwell said he has also found crossovers from the military side, as well.

Communication

“Great communication is key when a situation is developing and when you need to put something out to leadership so they can make a judgment call,” he said. “Camaraderie is a big thing on our teams, and it keeps me motivated when taking on a new task.”

Whether he is in his civilian or military role, Caldwell said he likes to learn and grow, making it a point to move laterally within DHS and absorb all the new information he can along the way.

“Complacency kills, so I take the time in learning new things outside of my normal skill set,” he said. “It makes for more excitement on a daily basis.”

That eagerness to learn — along with being highly competent and having a strong commitment to the homeland security mission — makes Caldwell an asset, said Matt Vaughn, a program manager in the section where Caldwell works at DHS.

“He’s a real go-getter, and you never have to tell him [to execute a task] twice,” Vaughn said. “He gets it. He does it, and it’s always done well.”

Training, Teamwork

While Caldwell said training and teamwork have been the backbone of his success with the South Carolina Army National Guard and the DHS, he is furthering his personal and professional growth by attending school for intelligence studies at the American Military University.

“Education helps me relay my thoughts in a productive way, helping me better connect with soldiers,” he said.

But education has not been the only source of learning for Caldwell.

He was a self-described “gung-ho kid” when he deployed to Afghanistan in 2007 with the South Carolina Army National Guard’s 218th Infantry Brigade Combat Team. He said the experience of working with his fellow soldiers in a deployed environment taught him the importance of thinking in a more critical and tempered way.

“I learned that even though you can’t control everything, you still have to remain mission focused,” Caldwell said. Following that mindset, he added, requires not making “emotional decisions.”

He said he tells new soldiers that taking on new tasks will help them stand out – such as becoming a “double threat” by learning the ins and outs of radio communication.

“Always be willing to learn something new,” Caldwell said. “Once you start to do that you fall into a pattern as that soldier with a can-do attitude.”

References

  1. ^ South Carolina Army National Guard (www.scguard.com)
  2. ^ Department of Homeland Security (www.dhs.gov)
0

Face of Defense: Guardsman Takes Army Values to Heart


ARLINGTON, Va. —

An infantryman with the South Carolina Army National Guard’s Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 118th Infantry Regiment, takes the Army values to heart. [1]

“We’re supporting the mission on the ground and making that difference,” said Army Sgt. Stephen Caldwell, adding that he loves being a part of a larger team.

“Being a fire team leader, providing fire superiority and taking over the objectives — it’s an adrenaline rush to say the least,” he said.

Monitoring Threats

In his civilian job, Caldwell is a watch analyst with the Department of Homeland Security. In that capacity, he monitors potential national threats that could pose harm to physical structures, cyber networks and the environment.[2]

“We have situational awareness on pretty much anything,” he said.

And, regarding his infantry duties, Caldwell said good radio communications provide a tactical edge for his unit.

“It’s communication that makes everything run and I love the challenge,” he said, adding the radio makes him feel like a double threat on the battlefield.

“A single radio has the power to change the outcome of an engagement,” Caldwell said.

Before working at DHS, he spent four years working at the South Carolina Emergency Management Division’s joint operations center. The experience there laid the groundwork for his current DHS job, Caldwell said.

“It gave me an understanding of what affects critical infrastructures,” he said. “Just seeing it from a technical standpoint helped me understand what is needed at the national level with DHS, as far as the cause and effect of things.”

Caldwell said he has also found crossovers from the military side, as well.

Communication

“Great communication is key when a situation is developing and when you need to put something out to leadership so they can make a judgment call,” he said. “Camaraderie is a big thing on our teams, and it keeps me motivated when taking on a new task.”

Whether he is in his civilian or military role, Caldwell said he likes to learn and grow, making it a point to move laterally within DHS and absorb all the new information he can along the way.

“Complacency kills, so I take the time in learning new things outside of my normal skill set,” he said. “It makes for more excitement on a daily basis.”

That eagerness to learn — along with being highly competent and having a strong commitment to the homeland security mission — makes Caldwell an asset, said Matt Vaughn, a program manager in the section where Caldwell works at DHS.

“He’s a real go-getter, and you never have to tell him [to execute a task] twice,” Vaughn said. “He gets it. He does it, and it’s always done well.”

Training, Teamwork

While Caldwell said training and teamwork have been the backbone of his success with the South Carolina Army National Guard and the DHS, he is furthering his personal and professional growth by attending school for intelligence studies at the American Military University.

“Education helps me relay my thoughts in a productive way, helping me better connect with soldiers,” he said.

But education has not been the only source of learning for Caldwell.

He was a self-described “gung-ho kid” when he deployed to Afghanistan in 2007 with the South Carolina Army National Guard’s 218th Infantry Brigade Combat Team. He said the experience of working with his fellow soldiers in a deployed environment taught him the importance of thinking in a more critical and tempered way.

“I learned that even though you can’t control everything, you still have to remain mission focused,” Caldwell said. Following that mindset, he added, requires not making “emotional decisions.”

He said he tells new soldiers that taking on new tasks will help them stand out – such as becoming a “double threat” by learning the ins and outs of radio communication.

“Always be willing to learn something new,” Caldwell said. “Once you start to do that you fall into a pattern as that soldier with a can-do attitude.”

References

  1. ^ South Carolina Army National Guard (www.scguard.com)
  2. ^ Department of Homeland Security (www.dhs.gov)
0

Face of Defense: Guardsman Takes Army Values to Heart


ARLINGTON, Va. —

An infantryman with the South Carolina Army National Guard’s Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 118th Infantry Regiment, takes the Army values to heart. [1]

“We’re supporting the mission on the ground and making that difference,” said Army Sgt. Stephen Caldwell, adding that he loves being a part of a larger team.

“Being a fire team leader, providing fire superiority and taking over the objectives — it’s an adrenaline rush to say the least,” he said.

Monitoring Threats

In his civilian job, Caldwell is a watch analyst with the Department of Homeland Security. In that capacity, he monitors potential national threats that could pose harm to physical structures, cyber networks and the environment.[2]

“We have situational awareness on pretty much anything,” he said.

And, regarding his infantry duties, Caldwell said good radio communications provide a tactical edge for his unit.

“It’s communication that makes everything run and I love the challenge,” he said, adding the radio makes him feel like a double threat on the battlefield.

“A single radio has the power to change the outcome of an engagement,” Caldwell said.

Before working at DHS, he spent four years working at the South Carolina Emergency Management Division’s joint operations center. The experience there laid the groundwork for his current DHS job, Caldwell said.

“It gave me an understanding of what affects critical infrastructures,” he said. “Just seeing it from a technical standpoint helped me understand what is needed at the national level with DHS, as far as the cause and effect of things.”

Caldwell said he has also found crossovers from the military side, as well.

Communication

“Great communication is key when a situation is developing and when you need to put something out to leadership so they can make a judgment call,” he said. “Camaraderie is a big thing on our teams, and it keeps me motivated when taking on a new task.”

Whether he is in his civilian or military role, Caldwell said he likes to learn and grow, making it a point to move laterally within DHS and absorb all the new information he can along the way.

“Complacency kills, so I take the time in learning new things outside of my normal skill set,” he said. “It makes for more excitement on a daily basis.”

That eagerness to learn — along with being highly competent and having a strong commitment to the homeland security mission — makes Caldwell an asset, said Matt Vaughn, a program manager in the section where Caldwell works at DHS.

“He’s a real go-getter, and you never have to tell him [to execute a task] twice,” Vaughn said. “He gets it. He does it, and it’s always done well.”

Training, Teamwork

While Caldwell said training and teamwork have been the backbone of his success with the South Carolina Army National Guard and the DHS, he is furthering his personal and professional growth by attending school for intelligence studies at the American Military University.

“Education helps me relay my thoughts in a productive way, helping me better connect with soldiers,” he said.

But education has not been the only source of learning for Caldwell.

He was a self-described “gung-ho kid” when he deployed to Afghanistan in 2007 with the South Carolina Army National Guard’s 218th Infantry Brigade Combat Team. He said the experience of working with his fellow soldiers in a deployed environment taught him the importance of thinking in a more critical and tempered way.

“I learned that even though you can’t control everything, you still have to remain mission focused,” Caldwell said. Following that mindset, he added, requires not making “emotional decisions.”

He said he tells new soldiers that taking on new tasks will help them stand out – such as becoming a “double threat” by learning the ins and outs of radio communication.

“Always be willing to learn something new,” Caldwell said. “Once you start to do that you fall into a pattern as that soldier with a can-do attitude.”

References

  1. ^ South Carolina Army National Guard (www.scguard.com)
  2. ^ Department of Homeland Security (www.dhs.gov)
0

Face of Defense: Guardsman Takes Army Values to Heart


ARLINGTON, Va. —

An infantryman with the South Carolina Army National Guard’s Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 118th Infantry Regiment, takes the Army values to heart. [1]

“We’re supporting the mission on the ground and making that difference,” said Army Sgt. Stephen Caldwell, adding that he loves being a part of a larger team.

“Being a fire team leader, providing fire superiority and taking over the objectives — it’s an adrenaline rush to say the least,” he said.

Monitoring Threats

In his civilian job, Caldwell is a watch analyst with the Department of Homeland Security. In that capacity, he monitors potential national threats that could pose harm to physical structures, cyber networks and the environment.[2]

“We have situational awareness on pretty much anything,” he said.

And, regarding his infantry duties, Caldwell said good radio communications provide a tactical edge for his unit.

“It’s communication that makes everything run and I love the challenge,” he said, adding the radio makes him feel like a double threat on the battlefield.

“A single radio has the power to change the outcome of an engagement,” Caldwell said.

Before working at DHS, he spent four years working at the South Carolina Emergency Management Division’s joint operations center. The experience there laid the groundwork for his current DHS job, Caldwell said.

“It gave me an understanding of what affects critical infrastructures,” he said. “Just seeing it from a technical standpoint helped me understand what is needed at the national level with DHS, as far as the cause and effect of things.”

Caldwell said he has also found crossovers from the military side, as well.

Communication

“Great communication is key when a situation is developing and when you need to put something out to leadership so they can make a judgment call,” he said. “Camaraderie is a big thing on our teams, and it keeps me motivated when taking on a new task.”

Whether he is in his civilian or military role, Caldwell said he likes to learn and grow, making it a point to move laterally within DHS and absorb all the new information he can along the way.

“Complacency kills, so I take the time in learning new things outside of my normal skill set,” he said. “It makes for more excitement on a daily basis.”

That eagerness to learn — along with being highly competent and having a strong commitment to the homeland security mission — makes Caldwell an asset, said Matt Vaughn, a program manager in the section where Caldwell works at DHS.

“He’s a real go-getter, and you never have to tell him [to execute a task] twice,” Vaughn said. “He gets it. He does it, and it’s always done well.”

Training, Teamwork

While Caldwell said training and teamwork have been the backbone of his success with the South Carolina Army National Guard and the DHS, he is furthering his personal and professional growth by attending school for intelligence studies at the American Military University.

“Education helps me relay my thoughts in a productive way, helping me better connect with soldiers,” he said.

But education has not been the only source of learning for Caldwell.

He was a self-described “gung-ho kid” when he deployed to Afghanistan in 2007 with the South Carolina Army National Guard’s 218th Infantry Brigade Combat Team. He said the experience of working with his fellow soldiers in a deployed environment taught him the importance of thinking in a more critical and tempered way.

“I learned that even though you can’t control everything, you still have to remain mission focused,” Caldwell said. Following that mindset, he added, requires not making “emotional decisions.”

He said he tells new soldiers that taking on new tasks will help them stand out – such as becoming a “double threat” by learning the ins and outs of radio communication.

“Always be willing to learn something new,” Caldwell said. “Once you start to do that you fall into a pattern as that soldier with a can-do attitude.”

References

  1. ^ South Carolina Army National Guard (www.scguard.com)
  2. ^ Department of Homeland Security (www.dhs.gov)
0

Think One Military Drone is Bad? Drone Swarms Are Terrifyingly Difficult to Stop

This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use[1].

The advent of military drones and their rapidly expanding portfolio of capabilities has already had a major impact on the future of warfare planning across the United States. The Pentagon has launched a major program to build a new artificial intelligence for controlling its own drone efforts, and Google is helping it[2]. Concern over the long-term impact of low-cost missiles and drones drove the Navy’s research into railguns and other delivery vehicles with lower-cost projectile systems until those programs were shelved. Legal experts and military tacticians have both debated how the use of remote autonomous vehicles could challenge existing views on the use of force across the military and in civilian encounters.

But our view of a military drone as an expensive, large, fixed-wing aircraft with a bevy of sophisticated onboard sensors and capabilities may rapidly be as obsolescent as the idea of wooden-hulled battleships. As a recent story in The Atlantic[3] points out, rapid advances in drone technology are making it easier to deploy incredibly primitive “drones” that are still capable of doing real damage.

The National Academy of Science was recently commissioned to write a report on the risks of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) and whether the military’s existing timetable for evaluating and developing responses to existing threats is satisfactory. The subsequent report wasted few words, stating[4]:

The U.S. Army’s force capability timeframe is too drawn out to address the rapid advancements in sUAS performance capabilities and anticipated threat uses. This is because potential adversaries are improving their sUAS capabilities on commercial and consumer developmental timelines.

FAA investigations into a single drone firing a handgun make headlines in the US — and to be sure, that’s something civilian law enforcement should absolutely care about — but forget about the dubious mechanics of trying to fire a weapon aboard a moving platform with a weight measured in ounces. A simple drone built out of plywood can carry and drop a hand grenade. Russian drones carrying a pound of thermite are believed to have destroyed two Ukrainian ammo depots last year, in July[5] and September[6]. And an entire swarm of primitive drones struck Russian forces in Syria this year[7]. Of the 13 drones that struck Russia’s Syrian HQ, seven were shot down and six brought down by electronic countermeasures. While the Russians defeated this attack, it proves the point — militias and guerilla organizations working with minimal tools can now build drones capable of launching attacks.

The US military has invested in electronic countermeasures, believing that the key to stopping drones is the use of jamming. But as drones become more proficient at making decisions on their own, the need for a remote uplink could vanish altogether. And as the report notes, simply shooting at the diminutive drones isn’t a great option for stopping them.

“Kinetic counters, such as shooting down a single, highly dynamic, fast-moving, low-flying hobby aircraft with small arms (rifles, shotguns, and light machine guns), are extremely difficult due to the agility and small size of sUASs,” the report states. “Additionally, swarming sUASs can be employed to overwhelm most existing kinetic countermeasures.”

The United States is working on its own drone swarms, including a recent test of a deployment of more than 100 robin-sized micro-drones designed by Perdix from a pair of F-18s. The Perdix drones are being built as part of research into using large swarms of drones with a distributed intelligence. The goal is to use them for unmanned aerial surveillance, taking advantage of the fact that it’s much harder to hit a bunch of tiny drones than a single large target like a Predator drone.

It’s not clear yet what an effective response to this attack strategy will look like. The military still grapples with fighting guerilla and insurgent forces effectively because the nature of civil conflict within states is, for various reasons, a difficult problem for conventional armed forces to confront. The advent of cheap, easily assembled drone swarms serving as a micro-bombing fleet could make such situations worse. How do you identify and strike military centers when the “air force” attacking you can be assembled largely from scrap and cobbled-together components, powered by a “brain” equivalent to a midrange smartphone, and launched from a parking lot?

References

  1. ^ Terms of use (www.ziffdavis.com)
  2. ^ is helping it (www.extremetech.com)
  3. ^ The Atlantic (www.theatlantic.com)
  4. ^ stating (www.nap.edu)
  5. ^ July (www.popsci.com)
  6. ^ September (www.popularmechanics.com)
  7. ^ this year (www.washingtonpost.com)
0

Military Meteorologist vs. Broadcast Meteorologist

They wear camo to blend in, while we wear bright colors to stand out. But at the end of the day meteorologists in the military and the ones you see on TV have the same goal; to provide an accurate forecast and keep people safe.

There are plenty of similarities between meteorology and the military. You’ve heard Storm Team 3 talk about fronts. Fronts separate different types of air masses. During World War I Norwegian meteorologists visualized these as battlefronts. That’s where they got their name. We also talk about the position of the jet stream. American bombers in World War II sometimes encountered unusually strong headwinds. On return flights they noticed strong westerly tailwinds, allowing meteorologists to gain a better understanding of what drives our weather.

I’ve read about the way past military events helped meteorologists learn more about the atmosphere…but since we live in a military town I wanted to dive deeper. I took a trip to Hunter Army Airfield to learn the differences between my job and that of a meteorologist in the Air Force.

Captain Kevin Brenner, Unit Commander of the 318th Weather Squadron says it all begins with education, “the air force has always driven degreed meteorologists to be their officers”

As for the Airmen who work under Brenner, “they’re getting a crash course in physics, and math, all the forecasting, how to draw their charts, how to generate forecasts, how to read meteorological code, how to take manual observations”

Once they learn these skills, “how to read surface maps, how to read a 500 mb chart,  how to read the models to know exactly when a storm is coming”

They are able to apply to a real life situation, “where they can actually identify a tornado using radar software, put out warning to the base, initiate the tornado siren and get people to shelter.”

Brenner and his team provide all of the weather services for the 3rd ID soldiers in town and in the field, “we train to do forecasting in a deployed environment(limited data forecasting) you could be trying to generate a forecast in the middle of the desert, where your closer weather sensor is 300 miles away, you may have a satellite, that’s it”

But that’s not the only challenge a Staff Weather Officer faces. Brenner says a big challenge is “conveying the weather to someone who doesn’t understand weather, they understand bullets bombs, soldiers, etc well I have to explain how the weather will impact them”

Something else military and broadcast meteorologists agree on, “weather is finicky, as far as the sciences it’s one of the newest, i think people take that for granted with their cell phones and models.”

All jokes aside we both agreed the title of meteorologist gives you a lot of pride, “you feel good about doing what you’re doing, generally a thankless job, like you said people only complain when it’s raining on their kids birthday”

Brenner says “getting that sense of accomplishment that knowing what were doing is helping achieve our national security objectives. He ended with “were going to get the job done and were going to win because that’s what the United States military does.”

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Military Meteorologist vs. Broadcast Meteorologist

They wear camo to blend in, while we wear bright colors to stand out. But at the end of the day meteorologists in the military and the ones you see on TV have the same goal; to provide an accurate forecast and keep people safe.

There are plenty of similarities between meteorology and the military. You’ve heard Storm Team 3 talk about fronts. Fronts separate different types of air masses. During World War I Norwegian meteorologists visualized these as battlefronts. That’s where they got their name. We also talk about the position of the jet stream. American bombers in World War II sometimes encountered unusually strong headwinds. On return flights they noticed strong westerly tailwinds, allowing meteorologists to gain a better understanding of what drives our weather.

I’ve read about the way past military events helped meteorologists learn more about the atmosphere…but since we live in a military town I wanted to dive deeper. I took a trip to Hunter Army Airfield to learn the differences between my job and that of a meteorologist in the Air Force.

Captain Kevin Brenner, Unit Commander of the 318th Weather Squadron says it all begins with education, “the air force has always driven degreed meteorologists to be their officers”

As for the Airmen who work under Brenner, “they’re getting a crash course in physics, and math, all the forecasting, how to draw their charts, how to generate forecasts, how to read meteorological code, how to take manual observations”

Once they learn these skills, “how to read surface maps, how to read a 500 mb chart,  how to read the models to know exactly when a storm is coming”

They are able to apply to a real life situation, “where they can actually identify a tornado using radar software, put out warning to the base, initiate the tornado siren and get people to shelter.”

Brenner and his team provide all of the weather services for the 3rd ID soldiers in town and in the field, “we train to do forecasting in a deployed environment(limited data forecasting) you could be trying to generate a forecast in the middle of the desert, where your closer weather sensor is 300 miles away, you may have a satellite, that’s it”

But that’s not the only challenge a Staff Weather Officer faces. Brenner says a big challenge is “conveying the weather to someone who doesn’t understand weather, they understand bullets bombs, soldiers, etc well I have to explain how the weather will impact them”

Something else military and broadcast meteorologists agree on, “weather is finicky, as far as the sciences it’s one of the newest, i think people take that for granted with their cell phones and models.”

All jokes aside we both agreed the title of meteorologist gives you a lot of pride, “you feel good about doing what you’re doing, generally a thankless job, like you said people only complain when it’s raining on their kids birthday”

Brenner says “getting that sense of accomplishment that knowing what were doing is helping achieve our national security objectives. He ended with “were going to get the job done and were going to win because that’s what the United States military does.”

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Homeland Security refutes Russian hacker reports

(Source: Jamiese Price/WBRC)(Source: Jamiese Price/WBRC)
BIRMINGHAM, AL (WBRC) –

A media report out today from NBC said seven states election process was violated by Russian hackers during the 2016 Presidential election. Homeland Security refutes the report.

Still, Secretary of State John Merrell is concerned about continued efforts to hack into the country’s election system. He tells WBRC Fox 6 News today Alabama is safe so far but realizes this is an ongoing fight.

Merrill said in 2016 Alabama’s election machines were scanned but nothing was penetrated by hackers. Merrill was in Washington D.C. just last week. He met with the head of Homeland Security and had a classified  briefing by the FBI, Homeland Security and counter intelligence about hacking efforts. Merrill has said it’s difficult to hack into Alabama’s election machines because they are not connected by the internet. But he says this is a problem his office and others across the nation have to stay on top of every day.

“The threat is real. People need to be in a position to understand we are being diligent. We are working hard to make sure we are protecting the integrity of the election system in the state of Alabama.” Merrill said.

Again, Alabama was not on the list of states the latest report names as having been penetrated by Russian Hackers. Homeland Security again says there is no evidence Russian hacker successfully manipulated the 2016 presidential election.

Copyright 2018 WBRC[1]. All rights reserved.

References

  1. ^ WBRC (www.wbrc.com)