Tagged: personal

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Giving troops a pay raise might be hurting the military

The 2019 budget proposal, if enacted, would give service members their biggest pay raise in eight years, a 2.4 percent increase in pay. But despite how good it sounds in the headlines, an across-the-board pay raise may not be what the military needs right now.

The military already saw a 2.1 percent pay increase request for 2018, and as military personnel costs are rising, some experts in military personnel are asking if across-the-board pay raises are the right approach to better the force.

Jim Perkins, former executive director of the Defense Entrepreneurs Forum and an Army reservist, says military pay is outpacing the inflation rate and civilians doing the same job, education and experience as troops are only paid 83 percent to 90 percent what service members are paid.

A 2013 Center for New American Security (CNAS) study[1] suggests the same thing.

“One of the largest contributors to the trend of rising military personnel costs is the growth in cash compensation. Military personnel cash compensation increased by 52 percent between 2002 and 2010, adjusted for inflation. Over the past 12 years, pay increases for military personnel have grown much faster than both inflation and private sector compensation,” the study stated.

Service members are at an even bigger financial advantage because of housing and food subsidies through basic allowance for housing (BAH) and commissaries.

The study stated the Defense Department could save $25 billion over 10 years if Congress issued more reasonable pay increases.

A Feb. 5 Congressional Budget Office report[2] stated personnel costs have increased 46 percent since 2000. A total of 42 percent of that growth is from BAH and basic pay.

The study stated that personnel costs were $142.3 billion in 2014.

Perkins thinks the across-the-board raises are harmful to the military’s search for talented individuals, while keeping less motivated individuals in the service.

“As much as I want to say paying the military more is great. It’s not necessarily,” Perkins said. “Throwing money at this problem is not going to solve it or not in the way that we want it to be solved.”

Perkins used a personal example to explain. An officer he knew was laid off from the Army after being passed over for promotion from captain to major. He left the military and couldn’t find equivalent compensation in the civilian sector based on his experience. He ended up joining the reserves and became an activated reservist for a year. He was promoted to major in the reserves.

“Now he is doing the same job as an active-duty captain, but getting paid more to do it as a major. A role for which he was previously deemed not qualified and the whole reason he was doing this was the fact that he couldn’t be paid as well if he wasn’t in the military,” Perkins said. “This epitomizes the fact that for the low performers in the military, if they stay in the military they may be staying because they’re afraid of losing this wonderful paycheck and benefits package.”

On the other hand, high-performing service members feel their effort is not being compensated; instead they are getting the same treatment as a low-performer for doing more work.

High performers “are seeing their hard work and talent is not being rewarded and differently than the lazy shirker who is sitting next to them,” Perkins said.

Those high performers can easily find jobs in the private sector that will pay them the equivalent compensation and benefits or much higher.

Perkins added that in the few exit surveys the military conducts, troops say pay is not the reason they are leaving, but rather the rigidity of military life.

Perkins suggested more flexibility in how Congress pays people in the military.

“We need to be able to compensate and reward people for taking on different roles that are more highly demanded or places that are bigger hardships. We need to have more flexibility in how we retain very specific skill sets,” Perkins said. “Raising pay across the board doesn’t necessarily do anything to solve the specific problems of a pilot shortage.”

The military is catching on to this as it watches some of the most needed employees like pilots, cyber experts and people trained in nuclear skills.

The military is offering modest bonuses to pilots and other occupations and creating some programs to make the work-life balance more flexible.

But, not many have caught on or are still in the pilot phase.

Meanwhile, the military is missing out on talented individuals it needs.

“Propensity to serve is declining, and each of the services, as well as the civilian sector, are vying for the same limited talent pool. We are clearly in a war for talent. Current forecasts based on leading economic indicators suggest difficult times ahead,” Vice Adm. Robert Burke, the deputy chief of Naval Operations of Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education, told the Senate Armed Services Committee on Feb. 14.

Military pay may be one of the issues hurting the effort.

Paying the military more across the board “is reflective of the divide and the guilt that exists between the civilians and the military. They don’t need to be paid more for what they’re doing and throwing money at this problem is not the way to solve it. Don’t say ‘Thank you for your service’ and then not realize we are sending troops to Niger. Don’t throw more money at the problem, get involved in the process,” Perkins said.

References

  1. ^ study (www.files.ethz.ch)
  2. ^ report (www.cbo.gov)
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Brazil's Military Is Put in Charge of Security in Rio de Janeiro

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RIO DE JANEIRO — President Michel Temer signed a decree on Friday putting the military in charge of security in Rio de Janeiro, an extraordinary measure intended to restore order in Brazil’s second-largest city and in the larger state of Rio amid an epidemic of violence.

It is the first time a Brazilian leader has ordered such a military intervention in a state since the return of democracy in the 1980s.

The decision was made two days after the end of Rio’s famed Carnival, which was marred by mass robberies, the looting of stores and shootouts between the police and drug gangs.

The decree confers sweeping authority on the military to restore order. It also places police forces, which have suffered shortages of personnel and equipment, under the command of a general, Walter Souza Braga Netto[1], who oversees military operations in the eastern part of the country.

“Together, the police and the armed forces will combat and confront those who have kidnapped our cities,” Mr. Temer said at the signing ceremony in the capital, Brasília. “Prison cells will no longer be thieves’ personal offices. Public squares will no longer be the reception halls for organized crime.”

Experts questioned the timing and motivation of the decision. It comes as Mr. Temer, who took office after his predecessor was impeached in 2016, has been weighing whether he has a chance of being elected president in October, despite his single-digit approval numbers.

The decree delays a vote on unpopular pensions legislation that looked increasingly doomed to failure: Under the Constitution, Brazilian lawmakers are barred from making sweeping legal changes during a military intervention imposed by decree.

“On the political level, Temer might be killing two birds with one stone,” said Christopher Harig, an expert on civilian-military relations in Brazil at King’s College London. “At the same time he creates an excuse for not being able to pass the social security reform.”

Brazil’s military leaders have expressed deep concern as the federal government has increasingly turned to the armed forces to quell outbreaks of violence around the country.

Gen. Eduardo Villas Bôas, the country’s top military commander, said in a recent interview conducted over email that the armed forces could not be expected to solve a security crisis rooted in longstanding problems that other government agencies had failed for decades to meaningfully address.

“Combating organized crime requires effective action by the government in economic and social spheres, in order to make drug trafficking less appealing in areas where a large segment of the population is grappling with unemployment,” General Boas wrote.

“Even as the military has been called to act in different areas, sometimes for lengthy periods, we don’t observe considerable changes due to lack of engagement by government agencies responsible for other areas.”

After Brazil was selected to host the 2014 World Cup in soccer and the 2016 Olympics, officials adopted an ambitious plan to transform poor districts that had long been hubs for drug gangs by adopting a community policing model that was supposed to pave the way for better schools, sanitation, health care and jobs.

Those plans fell short amid pervasive corruption[2], and Brazil entered a yearslong recession that left the state of Rio de Janeiro bankrupt.

General Boas also warned that permanently deploying military personnel to the front lines of Rio’s drug wars increased the risk that soldiers might become complicit in organized crime.

“These criminal structures, especially those linked to drug trafficking with international ties, makes it far more likely that institutions will become tainted,” he said. “There’s a possibility that troops could become tainted.”

Members of Rio’s military police, which has primary responsibility for security in the city, have lost control of large swaths of the city to well-armed drug gangs that act as the de facto authority in several teeming communities known as favelas. Critics accuse the police of using heavy-handed tactics, limiting their effectiveness, and say some members of the force have colluded with criminal organizations.

Lis Moriconi contributed reporting.

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References

  1. ^ Walter Souza Braga Netto (www.defesa.gov.br)
  2. ^ amid pervasive corruption (www.nytimes.com)
0

Military Trial Opens For 17-Year-Old Palestinian Activist

Palestinian activist Ahed Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of her altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Ariel Schalit/AP

The trial opened Tuesday in an Israeli military court for 17-year-old Ahed Tamimi. She is accused of assaulting Israeli soldiers outside her home in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.

For many Palestinians, Tamimi is a symbol of resistance to a half-century military occupation that stands in the way of Palestinian independence and shows no sign of ending.

For many Israelis, Tamimi is a provocateur who goads soldiers on video and champions rock-throwing, influenced by relatives who have been involved in protests and attacks against Israelis.

Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of an altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral[2].

Tamimi has been in Israeli jail since December, and the case has garnered international attention. She was ushered into the small courtroom Tuesday morning, appearing calm, as a large group of reporters, foreign diplomats and some Israeli peace activists crowded the area.

But shortly after, the military judge ordered that the trial be held behind closed doors, and Tamimi was ushered out of the courtroom. The reporters and observers were ordered to leave, then allowed back into the courtroom as Tamimi’s lawyer argued to keep the trial open.

“I don’t think this is in the interest of the minor” to have a large crowd in the courtroom, military judge Lt. Col. Menachem Lieberman ruled, clearing the courtroom of all but her family and lawyers.

“What I think is that the court doesn’t think it’s good for the court to have all of you inside of it,” Tamimi’s attorney Gaby Lasky told reporters outside, “so you cannot carry on watching her trial.” She said the military prosecutors did not object to an open trial.

Tamimi is indicted on 12 counts, including assaulting an Israeli officer and soldier — as seen in the video — on Dec. 15 and for five additional events in which she allegedly assaulted Israeli forces, threw rocks at them, threatened them, obstructed them during their duties and participated in riots and incited others to do so. She could face several months or years in jail if convicted.

An indictment also was filed against Nariman Tamimi, Ahed’s mother, who uploaded the video to Facebook. In it, the soldiers don’t appear to react to Tamimi’s confrontation. The military said in a statement that it is charging Nariman Tamimi with using Facebook to “incite others to commit terrorist attacks.”

Both women are being held until the end of their proceedings, which could last months.

The altercation with soldiers happened shortly after Tamimi’s cousin was shot in the head with a rubber bullet during a demonstration as he climbed a wall of a complex that Israeli soldiers had commandeered, according to Bassem Tamimi, Ahed’s father, who is a well-known leader of protests in his village.

Military prosecutors say Ahed Tamimi’s slapping, kicking and punching of soldiers was assault. Bassem Tamimi recently told NPR that his daughter’s confrontation is a natural reaction to a life of watching her relatives being arrested and killed.

Lasky, Tamimi’s lawyer, said Israel “wants to deter Ahed and other young people from resisting occupation nonviolently.”

In an interview with NPR, Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Michael Oren recently described the video as very personal for Israelis. Referring to soldiers, he said that “for an Israeli audience to see again and again photos of our children being beaten up and not have the army react in any way was very, very difficult for the society.”

Human rights advocates, including Human Rights Watch, have criticized Ahed Tamimi’s pre-trial detention – now at more than 55 days. “Her case raises concern that Israel’s military justice system, which detains hundreds of Palestinian children every year, is incapable of respecting children’s rights,” the rights group stated[3].

Bassem Tamimi said he rejected the authority of the military court and did not expect justice to be delivered in his daughter’s trial.

B’tselem, an Israeli human rights organization, criticized the decision to close the trial to reporters. “The sudden concern for her rights is even less convincing considering their violation up till now, including her nighttime arrest, which was released to the media, her lengthy investigation in which she faced her interrogators by herself, and her remand in custody,” B’tselem added.

Lasky told reporters that in her preliminary arguments on Tuesday, she argued that the military court itself is illegitimate “because of the illegality of the occupation.”

She said Israel’s occupation of the West Bank, now in its 51st year, is no longer temporary — because of the existence of Israeli settlements and lawmakers’ efforts to annex Israeli settlement areas to Israel — and so therefore not legal.

“Occupation is illegal, and so this court cannot be holding trial,” she told reporters.

A statement from activists representing the Tamimis said Lasky also argued there is “abuse of process” because Israeli authorities prosecute residents of the West Bank under two separate legal systems — civil courts for Israeli settlers and military courts for Palestinians.

Israel argues that its presence in the West Bank is not illegal and that its disputed status should be determined through negotiations. It also argues the Palestinians have repeatedly declined Israeli offers of compromise on the territory.

The prosecution read the indictment, but Ahed Tamimi has not yet entered a plea. The next hearing is scheduled for March 11, Lasky said.

References

  1. ^ Enlarge this image (media.npr.org)
  2. ^ posted by her mother, went viral (www.facebook.com)
  3. ^ the rights group stated (www.hrw.org)
0

Military Trial Opens For 17-Year-Old Palestinian Activist

Palestinian activist Ahed Tamimi in an Israeli military court near Jerusalem on Tuesday. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Ariel Schalit/AP

The trial opened Tuesday in an Israeli military for 17-year-old Ahed Tamimi. She is accused of assaulting Israeli soldiers outside her home in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.

For many Palestinians, Tamimi is a symbol of resistance to a half-century military occupation that stands in the way of Palestinian independence and shows no sign of ending.

For many Israelis, Tamimi is a provocateur who goads soldiers on video and champions rock-throwing, influenced by relatives who have been involved in protests and attacks against Israelis.

Tamimi was arrested and indicted following a public outcry in Israeli when a video of her altercation with the soldiers posted by her mother went viral[2].

Tamimi has been in Israeli jail since December and the case has garnered international attention. She was ushered into the small courtroom Tuesday morning, appearing calm, as a large group of reporters, foreign diplomats and some Israeli peace activists crowded the area.

But shortly after, the military judge ordered that the trial be held behind closed doors, and Tamimi was ushered out of the courtroom. The reporters and observers were ordered to leave, then allowed back into the courtroom as Tamimi’s lawyer argued to keep the trial open.

“I don’t think this is in the interest of the minor” to have a large crowd in the courtroom, military judge Lt. Col. Menachem Lieberman ruled, clearing the courtroom to all but her family and lawyers.

“What I think is that the court doesn’t think it’s good for the court to have all of you inside of it,” Tamimi’s attorney Gaby Lasky told reporters outside, “so you cannot carry on watching her trial.” She claimed the military prosecutors did not object to an open trial.

Tamimi is indicted on 12 counts, including assaulting an Israeli officer and soldier — as seen in the video — on December 15, and for five additional events in which she allegedly assaulted Israeli forces, threw rocks at them, threatened them, obstructed them during their duties, and participated in riots and incited others to do so. She could face several months or years in jail if convicted.

An indictment also was filed against Nariman Tamimi, Ahed’s mother, who uploaded the video to Facebook. In it, the soldiers don’t appear to react to Tamimi’s confrontation. The military said in a statement that it is charging Nariman Tamimi with using Facebook to “incite others to commit terrorist attacks.”

Both women are being held until the end of their proceedings, which could last months.

The altercation with soldiers happened shortly after Tamimi’s cousin was shot in the head with a rubber bullet during a demonstration as he climbed a wall of a complex Israeli soldiers had commandeered, according to Bassem Tamimi, Ahed’s father, who is a well-known leader of protests in his village.

Military prosecutors say Ahed Tamimi’s slapping, kicking and punching soldiers was assault. Bassem Tamimi recently told NPR that his daughter’s confrontation is a natural reaction to a life of watching her relatives being arrested and killed.

Lasky, Tamimi’s lawyer, said Israel “wants to deter Ahed and other young people from resisting occupation nonviolently.”

In an interview with NPR, Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Michael Oren recently described the video as very personal for Israelis. Referring to soldiers, he said that “for an Israeli audience to see again and again photos of our children being beaten up and not have the army react in any way was very, very difficult for the society.”

Human rights advocates, including Human Rights Watch, have criticized Ahed Tamimi’s pre-trial detention – now at more than 55 days. “Her case raises concern that Israel’s military justice system, which detains hundreds of Palestinian children every year, is incapable of respecting children’s rights,” the rights group stated[3].

Bassem Tamimi said he rejected the authority of the military court and did not expect justice to be delivered in his daughter’s trial.

B’tselem, an Israeli human rights organization, criticized the decision to close the trial to reporters. “The sudden concern for her rights is even less convincing considering their violation up till now, including her nighttime arrest, which was released to the media, her lengthy investigation in which she faced her interrogators by herself, and her remand in custody,” B’tselem added.

Lasky told reporters that, in her preliminary arguments on Tuesday, she argued the military court itself is illegitimate “because of the illegality of the occupation.”

She said Israel’s occupation of the West Bank, now in its 51st year, is no longer temporary — due to the existence of Israeli settlements and lawmakers’ efforts to annex Israeli settlement areas to Israel — and so therefore not legal.

“Occupation is illegal and so this court cannot be holding trial,” she told reporters.

A statement from activists representing the Tamimis said Lasky also argued there is “abuse of process” because Israeli authorities prosecute residents of the West Bank under two separate legal systems — civil courts for Israeli settlers and military courts for Palestinians.

Israel argues its presence in the West Bank is not illegal, and that its disputed status should be determined through negotiations. It also argues the Palestinians have repeatedly declined Israeli offers of compromise on the territory.

The prosecution read the indictment but Ahed Tamimi has not yet entered a plea. The next hearing is scheduled for March 11, Lasky said.

References

  1. ^ Enlarge this image (media.npr.org)
  2. ^ posted by her mother went viral (www.facebook.com)
  3. ^ the rights group stated (www.hrw.org)
0

Military Trial Opens For 17-Year-Old Palestinian Activist

Palestinian activist Ahed Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of her altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Ariel Schalit/AP

The trial opened Tuesday in an Israeli military court for 17-year-old Ahed Tamimi. She is accused of assaulting Israeli soldiers outside her home in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.

For many Palestinians, Tamimi is a symbol of resistance to a half-century military occupation that stands in the way of Palestinian independence and shows no sign of ending.

For many Israelis, Tamimi is a provocateur who goads soldiers on video and champions rock-throwing, influenced by relatives who have been involved in protests and attacks against Israelis.

Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of an altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral[2].

Tamimi has been in Israeli jail since December, and the case has garnered international attention. She was ushered into the small courtroom Tuesday morning, appearing calm, as a large group of reporters, foreign diplomats and some Israeli peace activists crowded the area.

But shortly after, the military judge ordered that the trial be held behind closed doors, and Tamimi was ushered out of the courtroom. The reporters and observers were ordered to leave, then allowed back into the courtroom as Tamimi’s lawyer argued to keep the trial open.

“I don’t think this is in the interest of the minor” to have a large crowd in the courtroom, military judge Lt. Col. Menachem Lieberman ruled, clearing the courtroom of all but her family and lawyers.

“What I think is that the court doesn’t think it’s good for the court to have all of you inside of it,” Tamimi’s attorney Gaby Lasky told reporters outside, “so you cannot carry on watching her trial.” She said the military prosecutors did not object to an open trial.

Tamimi is indicted on 12 counts, including assaulting an Israeli officer and soldier — as seen in the video — on Dec. 15 and for five additional events in which she allegedly assaulted Israeli forces, threw rocks at them, threatened them, obstructed them during their duties and participated in riots and incited others to do so. She could face several months or years in jail if convicted.

An indictment also was filed against Nariman Tamimi, Ahed’s mother, who uploaded the video to Facebook. In it, the soldiers don’t appear to react to Tamimi’s confrontation. The military said in a statement that it is charging Nariman Tamimi with using Facebook to “incite others to commit terrorist attacks.”

Both women are being held until the end of their proceedings, which could last months.

The altercation with soldiers happened shortly after Tamimi’s cousin was shot in the head with a rubber bullet during a demonstration as he climbed a wall of a complex that Israeli soldiers had commandeered, according to Bassem Tamimi, Ahed’s father, who is a well-known leader of protests in his village.

Military prosecutors say Ahed Tamimi’s slapping, kicking and punching of soldiers was assault. Bassem Tamimi recently told NPR that his daughter’s confrontation is a natural reaction to a life of watching her relatives being arrested and killed.

Lasky, Tamimi’s lawyer, said Israel “wants to deter Ahed and other young people from resisting occupation nonviolently.”

In an interview with NPR, Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Michael Oren recently described the video as very personal for Israelis. Referring to soldiers, he said that “for an Israeli audience to see again and again photos of our children being beaten up and not have the army react in any way was very, very difficult for the society.”

Human rights advocates, including Human Rights Watch, have criticized Ahed Tamimi’s pre-trial detention – now at more than 55 days. “Her case raises concern that Israel’s military justice system, which detains hundreds of Palestinian children every year, is incapable of respecting children’s rights,” the rights group stated[3].

Bassem Tamimi said he rejected the authority of the military court and did not expect justice to be delivered in his daughter’s trial.

B’tselem, an Israeli human rights organization, criticized the decision to close the trial to reporters. “The sudden concern for her rights is even less convincing considering their violation up till now, including her nighttime arrest, which was released to the media, her lengthy investigation in which she faced her interrogators by herself, and her remand in custody,” B’tselem added.

Lasky told reporters that in her preliminary arguments on Tuesday, she argued that the military court itself is illegitimate “because of the illegality of the occupation.”

She said Israel’s occupation of the West Bank, now in its 51st year, is no longer temporary — because of the existence of Israeli settlements and lawmakers’ efforts to annex Israeli settlement areas to Israel — and so therefore not legal.

“Occupation is illegal, and so this court cannot be holding trial,” she told reporters.

A statement from activists representing the Tamimis said Lasky also argued there is “abuse of process” because Israeli authorities prosecute residents of the West Bank under two separate legal systems — civil courts for Israeli settlers and military courts for Palestinians.

Israel argues that its presence in the West Bank is not illegal and that its disputed status should be determined through negotiations. It also argues the Palestinians have repeatedly declined Israeli offers of compromise on the territory.

The prosecution read the indictment, but Ahed Tamimi has not yet entered a plea. The next hearing is scheduled for March 11, Lasky said.

References

  1. ^ Enlarge this image (media.npr.org)
  2. ^ posted by her mother, went viral (www.facebook.com)
  3. ^ the rights group stated (www.hrw.org)
0

Military Trial Opens For 17-Year-Old Palestinian Activist

Palestinian activist Ahed Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of her altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Ariel Schalit/AP

The trial opened Tuesday in an Israeli military court for 17-year-old Ahed Tamimi. She is accused of assaulting Israeli soldiers outside her home in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.

For many Palestinians, Tamimi is a symbol of resistance to a half-century military occupation that stands in the way of Palestinian independence and shows no sign of ending.

For many Israelis, Tamimi is a provocateur who goads soldiers on video and champions rock-throwing, influenced by relatives who have been involved in protests and attacks against Israelis.

Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of an altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral[2].

Tamimi has been in Israeli jail since December, and the case has garnered international attention. She was ushered into the small courtroom Tuesday morning, appearing calm, as a large group of reporters, foreign diplomats and some Israeli peace activists crowded the area.

But shortly after, the military judge ordered that the trial be held behind closed doors, and Tamimi was ushered out of the courtroom. The reporters and observers were ordered to leave, then allowed back into the courtroom as Tamimi’s lawyer argued to keep the trial open.

“I don’t think this is in the interest of the minor” to have a large crowd in the courtroom, military judge Lt. Col. Menachem Lieberman ruled, clearing the courtroom of all but her family and lawyers.

“What I think is that the court doesn’t think it’s good for the court to have all of you inside of it,” Tamimi’s attorney Gaby Lasky told reporters outside, “so you cannot carry on watching her trial.” She said the military prosecutors did not object to an open trial.

Tamimi is indicted on 12 counts, including assaulting an Israeli officer and soldier — as seen in the video — on Dec. 15 and for five additional events in which she allegedly assaulted Israeli forces, threw rocks at them, threatened them, obstructed them during their duties and participated in riots and incited others to do so. She could face several months or years in jail if convicted.

An indictment also was filed against Nariman Tamimi, Ahed’s mother, who uploaded the video to Facebook. In it, the soldiers don’t appear to react to Tamimi’s confrontation. The military said in a statement that it is charging Nariman Tamimi with using Facebook to “incite others to commit terrorist attacks.”

Both women are being held until the end of their proceedings, which could last months.

The altercation with soldiers happened shortly after Tamimi’s cousin was shot in the head with a rubber bullet during a demonstration as he climbed a wall of a complex that Israeli soldiers had commandeered, according to Bassem Tamimi, Ahed’s father, who is a well-known leader of protests in his village.

Military prosecutors say Ahed Tamimi’s slapping, kicking and punching of soldiers was assault. Bassem Tamimi recently told NPR that his daughter’s confrontation is a natural reaction to a life of watching her relatives being arrested and killed.

Lasky, Tamimi’s lawyer, said Israel “wants to deter Ahed and other young people from resisting occupation nonviolently.”

In an interview with NPR, Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Michael Oren recently described the video as very personal for Israelis. Referring to soldiers, he said that “for an Israeli audience to see again and again photos of our children being beaten up and not have the army react in any way was very, very difficult for the society.”

Human rights advocates, including Human Rights Watch, have criticized Ahed Tamimi’s pre-trial detention – now at more than 55 days. “Her case raises concern that Israel’s military justice system, which detains hundreds of Palestinian children every year, is incapable of respecting children’s rights,” the rights group stated[3].

Bassem Tamimi said he rejected the authority of the military court and did not expect justice to be delivered in his daughter’s trial.

B’tselem, an Israeli human rights organization, criticized the decision to close the trial to reporters. “The sudden concern for her rights is even less convincing considering their violation up till now, including her nighttime arrest, which was released to the media, her lengthy investigation in which she faced her interrogators by herself, and her remand in custody,” B’tselem added.

Lasky told reporters that in her preliminary arguments on Tuesday, she argued that the military court itself is illegitimate “because of the illegality of the occupation.”

She said Israel’s occupation of the West Bank, now in its 51st year, is no longer temporary — because of the existence of Israeli settlements and lawmakers’ efforts to annex Israeli settlement areas to Israel — and so therefore not legal.

“Occupation is illegal, and so this court cannot be holding trial,” she told reporters.

A statement from activists representing the Tamimis said Lasky also argued there is “abuse of process” because Israeli authorities prosecute residents of the West Bank under two separate legal systems — civil courts for Israeli settlers and military courts for Palestinians.

Israel argues that its presence in the West Bank is not illegal and that its disputed status should be determined through negotiations. It also argues the Palestinians have repeatedly declined Israeli offers of compromise on the territory.

The prosecution read the indictment, but Ahed Tamimi has not yet entered a plea. The next hearing is scheduled for March 11, Lasky said.

References

  1. ^ Enlarge this image (media.npr.org)
  2. ^ posted by her mother, went viral (www.facebook.com)
  3. ^ the rights group stated (www.hrw.org)
0

Military Trial Opens For 17-Year-Old Palestinian Activist

Palestinian activist Ahed Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of her altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Ariel Schalit/AP

The trial opened Tuesday in an Israeli military court for 17-year-old Ahed Tamimi. She is accused of assaulting Israeli soldiers outside her home in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.

For many Palestinians, Tamimi is a symbol of resistance to a half-century military occupation that stands in the way of Palestinian independence and shows no sign of ending.

For many Israelis, Tamimi is a provocateur who goads soldiers on video and champions rock-throwing, influenced by relatives who have been involved in protests and attacks against Israelis.

Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of an altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral[2].

Tamimi has been in Israeli jail since December, and the case has garnered international attention. She was ushered into the small courtroom Tuesday morning, appearing calm, as a large group of reporters, foreign diplomats and some Israeli peace activists crowded the area.

But shortly after, the military judge ordered that the trial be held behind closed doors, and Tamimi was ushered out of the courtroom. The reporters and observers were ordered to leave, then allowed back into the courtroom as Tamimi’s lawyer argued to keep the trial open.

“I don’t think this is in the interest of the minor” to have a large crowd in the courtroom, military judge Lt. Col. Menachem Lieberman ruled, clearing the courtroom of all but her family and lawyers.

“What I think is that the court doesn’t think it’s good for the court to have all of you inside of it,” Tamimi’s attorney Gaby Lasky told reporters outside, “so you cannot carry on watching her trial.” She said the military prosecutors did not object to an open trial.

Tamimi is indicted on 12 counts, including assaulting an Israeli officer and soldier — as seen in the video — on Dec. 15 and for five additional events in which she allegedly assaulted Israeli forces, threw rocks at them, threatened them, obstructed them during their duties and participated in riots and incited others to do so. She could face several months or years in jail if convicted.

An indictment also was filed against Nariman Tamimi, Ahed’s mother, who uploaded the video to Facebook. In it, the soldiers don’t appear to react to Tamimi’s confrontation. The military said in a statement that it is charging Nariman Tamimi with using Facebook to “incite others to commit terrorist attacks.”

Both women are being held until the end of their proceedings, which could last months.

The altercation with soldiers happened shortly after Tamimi’s cousin was shot in the head with a rubber bullet during a demonstration as he climbed a wall of a complex that Israeli soldiers had commandeered, according to Bassem Tamimi, Ahed’s father, who is a well-known leader of protests in his village.

Military prosecutors say Ahed Tamimi’s slapping, kicking and punching of soldiers was assault. Bassem Tamimi recently told NPR that his daughter’s confrontation is a natural reaction to a life of watching her relatives being arrested and killed.

Lasky, Tamimi’s lawyer, said Israel “wants to deter Ahed and other young people from resisting occupation nonviolently.”

In an interview with NPR, Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Michael Oren recently described the video as very personal for Israelis. Referring to soldiers, he said that “for an Israeli audience to see again and again photos of our children being beaten up and not have the army react in any way was very, very difficult for the society.”

Human rights advocates, including Human Rights Watch, have criticized Ahed Tamimi’s pre-trial detention – now at more than 55 days. “Her case raises concern that Israel’s military justice system, which detains hundreds of Palestinian children every year, is incapable of respecting children’s rights,” the rights group stated[3].

Bassem Tamimi said he rejected the authority of the military court and did not expect justice to be delivered in his daughter’s trial.

B’tselem, an Israeli human rights organization, criticized the decision to close the trial to reporters. “The sudden concern for her rights is even less convincing considering their violation up till now, including her nighttime arrest, which was released to the media, her lengthy investigation in which she faced her interrogators by herself, and her remand in custody,” B’tselem added.

Lasky told reporters that in her preliminary arguments on Tuesday, she argued that the military court itself is illegitimate “because of the illegality of the occupation.”

She said Israel’s occupation of the West Bank, now in its 51st year, is no longer temporary — because of the existence of Israeli settlements and lawmakers’ efforts to annex Israeli settlement areas to Israel — and so therefore not legal.

“Occupation is illegal, and so this court cannot be holding trial,” she told reporters.

A statement from activists representing the Tamimis said Lasky also argued there is “abuse of process” because Israeli authorities prosecute residents of the West Bank under two separate legal systems — civil courts for Israeli settlers and military courts for Palestinians.

Israel argues that its presence in the West Bank is not illegal and that its disputed status should be determined through negotiations. It also argues the Palestinians have repeatedly declined Israeli offers of compromise on the territory.

The prosecution read the indictment, but Ahed Tamimi has not yet entered a plea. The next hearing is scheduled for March 11, Lasky said.

References

  1. ^ Enlarge this image (media.npr.org)
  2. ^ posted by her mother, went viral (www.facebook.com)
  3. ^ the rights group stated (www.hrw.org)
0

Military Trial Opens For 17-Year-Old Palestinian Activist

Palestinian activist Ahed Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of her altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Ariel Schalit/AP

The trial opened Tuesday in an Israeli military court for 17-year-old Ahed Tamimi. She is accused of assaulting Israeli soldiers outside her home in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.

For many Palestinians, Tamimi is a symbol of resistance to a half-century military occupation that stands in the way of Palestinian independence and shows no sign of ending.

For many Israelis, Tamimi is a provocateur who goads soldiers on video and champions rock-throwing, influenced by relatives who have been involved in protests and attacks against Israelis.

Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of an altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral[2].

Tamimi has been in Israeli jail since December, and the case has garnered international attention. She was ushered into the small courtroom Tuesday morning, appearing calm, as a large group of reporters, foreign diplomats and some Israeli peace activists crowded the area.

But shortly after, the military judge ordered that the trial be held behind closed doors, and Tamimi was ushered out of the courtroom. The reporters and observers were ordered to leave, then allowed back into the courtroom as Tamimi’s lawyer argued to keep the trial open.

“I don’t think this is in the interest of the minor” to have a large crowd in the courtroom, military judge Lt. Col. Menachem Lieberman ruled, clearing the courtroom of all but her family and lawyers.

“What I think is that the court doesn’t think it’s good for the court to have all of you inside of it,” Tamimi’s attorney Gaby Lasky told reporters outside, “so you cannot carry on watching her trial.” She said the military prosecutors did not object to an open trial.

Tamimi is indicted on 12 counts, including assaulting an Israeli officer and soldier — as seen in the video — on Dec. 15 and for five additional events in which she allegedly assaulted Israeli forces, threw rocks at them, threatened them, obstructed them during their duties and participated in riots and incited others to do so. She could face several months or years in jail if convicted.

An indictment also was filed against Nariman Tamimi, Ahed’s mother, who uploaded the video to Facebook. In it, the soldiers don’t appear to react to Tamimi’s confrontation. The military said in a statement that it is charging Nariman Tamimi with using Facebook to “incite others to commit terrorist attacks.”

Both women are being held until the end of their proceedings, which could last months.

The altercation with soldiers happened shortly after Tamimi’s cousin was shot in the head with a rubber bullet during a demonstration as he climbed a wall of a complex that Israeli soldiers had commandeered, according to Bassem Tamimi, Ahed’s father, who is a well-known leader of protests in his village.

Military prosecutors say Ahed Tamimi’s slapping, kicking and punching of soldiers was assault. Bassem Tamimi recently told NPR that his daughter’s confrontation is a natural reaction to a life of watching her relatives being arrested and killed.

Lasky, Tamimi’s lawyer, said Israel “wants to deter Ahed and other young people from resisting occupation nonviolently.”

In an interview with NPR, Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Michael Oren recently described the video as very personal for Israelis. Referring to soldiers, he said that “for an Israeli audience to see again and again photos of our children being beaten up and not have the army react in any way was very, very difficult for the society.”

Human rights advocates, including Human Rights Watch, have criticized Ahed Tamimi’s pre-trial detention – now at more than 55 days. “Her case raises concern that Israel’s military justice system, which detains hundreds of Palestinian children every year, is incapable of respecting children’s rights,” the rights group stated[3].

Bassem Tamimi said he rejected the authority of the military court and did not expect justice to be delivered in his daughter’s trial.

B’tselem, an Israeli human rights organization, criticized the decision to close the trial to reporters. “The sudden concern for her rights is even less convincing considering their violation up till now, including her nighttime arrest, which was released to the media, her lengthy investigation in which she faced her interrogators by herself, and her remand in custody,” B’tselem added.

Lasky told reporters that in her preliminary arguments on Tuesday, she argued that the military court itself is illegitimate “because of the illegality of the occupation.”

She said Israel’s occupation of the West Bank, now in its 51st year, is no longer temporary — because of the existence of Israeli settlements and lawmakers’ efforts to annex Israeli settlement areas to Israel — and so therefore not legal.

“Occupation is illegal, and so this court cannot be holding trial,” she told reporters.

A statement from activists representing the Tamimis said Lasky also argued there is “abuse of process” because Israeli authorities prosecute residents of the West Bank under two separate legal systems — civil courts for Israeli settlers and military courts for Palestinians.

Israel argues that its presence in the West Bank is not illegal and that its disputed status should be determined through negotiations. It also argues the Palestinians have repeatedly declined Israeli offers of compromise on the territory.

The prosecution read the indictment, but Ahed Tamimi has not yet entered a plea. The next hearing is scheduled for March 11, Lasky said.

References

  1. ^ Enlarge this image (media.npr.org)
  2. ^ posted by her mother, went viral (www.facebook.com)
  3. ^ the rights group stated (www.hrw.org)
0

Military Trial Opens For 17-Year-Old Palestinian Activist

Palestinian activist Ahed Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of her altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Ariel Schalit/AP

The trial opened Tuesday in an Israeli military court for 17-year-old Ahed Tamimi. She is accused of assaulting Israeli soldiers outside her home in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.

For many Palestinians, Tamimi is a symbol of resistance to a half-century military occupation that stands in the way of Palestinian independence and shows no sign of ending.

For many Israelis, Tamimi is a provocateur who goads soldiers on video and champions rock-throwing, influenced by relatives who have been involved in protests and attacks against Israelis.

Tamimi was arrested and indicted after a public outcry in Israel when a video of an altercation with the soldiers, posted by her mother, went viral[2].

Tamimi has been in Israeli jail since December, and the case has garnered international attention. She was ushered into the small courtroom Tuesday morning, appearing calm, as a large group of reporters, foreign diplomats and some Israeli peace activists crowded the area.

But shortly after, the military judge ordered that the trial be held behind closed doors, and Tamimi was ushered out of the courtroom. The reporters and observers were ordered to leave, then allowed back into the courtroom as Tamimi’s lawyer argued to keep the trial open.

“I don’t think this is in the interest of the minor” to have a large crowd in the courtroom, military judge Lt. Col. Menachem Lieberman ruled, clearing the courtroom of all but her family and lawyers.

“What I think is that the court doesn’t think it’s good for the court to have all of you inside of it,” Tamimi’s attorney Gaby Lasky told reporters outside, “so you cannot carry on watching her trial.” She said the military prosecutors did not object to an open trial.

Tamimi is indicted on 12 counts, including assaulting an Israeli officer and soldier — as seen in the video — on Dec. 15 and for five additional events in which she allegedly assaulted Israeli forces, threw rocks at them, threatened them, obstructed them during their duties and participated in riots and incited others to do so. She could face several months or years in jail if convicted.

An indictment also was filed against Nariman Tamimi, Ahed’s mother, who uploaded the video to Facebook. In it, the soldiers don’t appear to react to Tamimi’s confrontation. The military said in a statement that it is charging Nariman Tamimi with using Facebook to “incite others to commit terrorist attacks.”

Both women are being held until the end of their proceedings, which could last months.

The altercation with soldiers happened shortly after Tamimi’s cousin was shot in the head with a rubber bullet during a demonstration as he climbed a wall of a complex that Israeli soldiers had commandeered, according to Bassem Tamimi, Ahed’s father, who is a well-known leader of protests in his village.

Military prosecutors say Ahed Tamimi’s slapping, kicking and punching of soldiers was assault. Bassem Tamimi recently told NPR that his daughter’s confrontation is a natural reaction to a life of watching her relatives being arrested and killed.

Lasky, Tamimi’s lawyer, said Israel “wants to deter Ahed and other young people from resisting occupation nonviolently.”

In an interview with NPR, Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Michael Oren recently described the video as very personal for Israelis. Referring to soldiers, he said that “for an Israeli audience to see again and again photos of our children being beaten up and not have the army react in any way was very, very difficult for the society.”

Human rights advocates, including Human Rights Watch, have criticized Ahed Tamimi’s pre-trial detention – now at more than 55 days. “Her case raises concern that Israel’s military justice system, which detains hundreds of Palestinian children every year, is incapable of respecting children’s rights,” the rights group stated[3].

Bassem Tamimi said he rejected the authority of the military court and did not expect justice to be delivered in his daughter’s trial.

B’tselem, an Israeli human rights organization, criticized the decision to close the trial to reporters. “The sudden concern for her rights is even less convincing considering their violation up till now, including her nighttime arrest, which was released to the media, her lengthy investigation in which she faced her interrogators by herself, and her remand in custody,” B’tselem added.

Lasky told reporters that in her preliminary arguments on Tuesday, she argued that the military court itself is illegitimate “because of the illegality of the occupation.”

She said Israel’s occupation of the West Bank, now in its 51st year, is no longer temporary — because of the existence of Israeli settlements and lawmakers’ efforts to annex Israeli settlement areas to Israel — and so therefore not legal.

“Occupation is illegal, and so this court cannot be holding trial,” she told reporters.

A statement from activists representing the Tamimis said Lasky also argued there is “abuse of process” because Israeli authorities prosecute residents of the West Bank under two separate legal systems — civil courts for Israeli settlers and military courts for Palestinians.

Israel argues that its presence in the West Bank is not illegal and that its disputed status should be determined through negotiations. It also argues the Palestinians have repeatedly declined Israeli offers of compromise on the territory.

The prosecution read the indictment, but Ahed Tamimi has not yet entered a plea. The next hearing is scheduled for March 11, Lasky said.

References

  1. ^ Enlarge this image (media.npr.org)
  2. ^ posted by her mother, went viral (www.facebook.com)
  3. ^ the rights group stated (www.hrw.org)