Tagged: opportunity

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82nd Airborne hosts first electronic warfare competition

Drew Brooks Military editor @DrewBrooks

Sgt. 1st Class Mike Sanders and Sgt. Sam Odior stood just outside a cluster of pine trees and stared at a small screen.

Sanders pressed an icon on the screen as Odior glanced up at the antenna protruding from a pack on the other soldier’s back.

“I think I’ve got something,” Sanders said as Odior leaned forward to get a better look.

“We’ve got a possible hit on the freq,” the paratrooper repeated, this time into a radio, signalling three other soldiers nearby.

In a wooded training area on Fort Bragg, the team of soldiers from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division were involved in a complicated game of hide and seek.

Using an electronic warfare system known as the VMAX, paratroopers from across the 82nd Airborne Division were competing to find a series of waypoints. Using the VMAX, the soldiers scanned for a signal frequency and then honed in on its source.

The navigational test was the first event in the 82nd Airborne Division’s inaugural Electronic Warfare Competition.

Lt. Col. Robert A. Robinson II, the division’s cyber electromagnetic activities, or CEMA, chief and the officer in charge of the competition, said the event was designed to showcase skills that are becoming more and more important on the modern battlefield.

Electronic warfare is used to jam enemy signals, defeat unmanned aerial systems and disable improvised explosive devices.

Robinson said teams received an alert with a location grid early Monday.

“They knew the competition was going to start, but they didn’t know where,” he said. “We’re trying to stick to the traditions of the division: to be ready any time, any where.”

The three-day competition will include several classroom tests, but it began in the field.

Capt. Brian Mercado of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team said the navigation test was forcing the soldiers to use their electronic warfare systems in ways they haven’t before.

In past training, Mercado said, soldiers used the VMAX systems defensively on drop zones to protect paratroopers from enemy systems. But the navigational test showed that the systems also could be used to pinpoint an enemy force.

“This goes beyond our typical training,” Mercado said.

The system is the size of a large backpack with large antennas protruding overhead and can be jumped with a paratrooper. The lightweight system can detect, locate, monitor and jam radio frequency signals.

Each brigade combat team in the division has a CEMA cell. And each sent at least one team to compete, Robinson said. Each must be able to plan, troubleshoot and execute missions as they are provided.

“It’s a great opportunity,” he said. “Electronic warfare is a big part of the future and this is the tactical-level support we provide.”

Military editor Drew Brooks can be reached at [email protected] or 486-3567.

0

82nd Airborne hosts first electronic warfare competition

Drew Brooks Military editor @DrewBrooks

Sgt. 1st Class Mike Sanders and Sgt. Sam Odior stood just outside a cluster of pine trees and stared at a small screen.

Sanders pressed an icon on the screen as Odior glanced up at the antenna protruding from a pack on the other soldier’s back.

“I think I’ve got something,” Sanders said as Odior leaned forward to get a better look.

“We’ve got a possible hit on the freq,” the paratrooper repeated, this time into a radio, signalling three other soldiers nearby.

In a wooded training area on Fort Bragg, the team of soldiers from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division were involved in a complicated game of hide and seek.

Using an electronic warfare system known as the VMAX, paratroopers from across the 82nd Airborne Division were competing to find a series of waypoints. Using the VMAX, the soldiers scanned for a signal frequency and then honed in on its source.

The navigational test was the first event in the 82nd Airborne Division’s inaugural Electronic Warfare Competition.

Lt. Col. Robert A. Robinson II, the division’s cyber electromagnetic activities, or CEMA, chief and the officer in charge of the competition, said the event was designed to showcase skills that are becoming more and more important on the modern battlefield.

Electronic warfare is used to jam enemy signals, defeat unmanned aerial systems and disable improvised explosive devices.

Robinson said teams received an alert with a location grid early Monday.

“They knew the competition was going to start, but they didn’t know where,” he said. “We’re trying to stick to the traditions of the division: to be ready any time, any where.”

The three-day competition will include several classroom tests, but it began in the field.

Capt. Brian Mercado of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team said the navigation test was forcing the soldiers to use their electronic warfare systems in ways they haven’t before.

In past training, Mercado said, soldiers used the VMAX systems defensively on drop zones to protect paratroopers from enemy systems. But the navigational test showed that the systems also could be used to pinpoint an enemy force.

“This goes beyond our typical training,” Mercado said.

The system is the size of a large backpack with large antennas protruding overhead and can be jumped with a paratrooper. The lightweight system can detect, locate, monitor and jam radio frequency signals.

Each brigade combat team in the division has a CEMA cell. And each sent at least one team to compete, Robinson said. Each must be able to plan, troubleshoot and execute missions as they are provided.

“It’s a great opportunity,” he said. “Electronic warfare is a big part of the future and this is the tactical-level support we provide.”

Military editor Drew Brooks can be reached at [email protected] or 486-3567.

0

82nd Airborne hosts first electronic warfare competition

Drew Brooks Military editor @DrewBrooks

Sgt. 1st Class Mike Sanders and Sgt. Sam Odior stood just outside a cluster of pine trees and stared at a small screen.

Sanders pressed an icon on the screen as Odior glanced up at the antenna protruding from a pack on the other soldier’s back.

“I think I’ve got something,” Sanders said as Odior leaned forward to get a better look.

“We’ve got a possible hit on the freq,” the paratrooper repeated, this time into a radio, signalling three other soldiers nearby.

In a wooded training area on Fort Bragg, the team of soldiers from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division were involved in a complicated game of hide and seek.

Using an electronic warfare system known as the VMAX, paratroopers from across the 82nd Airborne Division were competing to find a series of waypoints. Using the VMAX, the soldiers scanned for a signal frequency and then honed in on its source.

The navigational test was the first event in the 82nd Airborne Division’s inaugural Electronic Warfare Competition.

Lt. Col. Robert A. Robinson II, the division’s cyber electromagnetic activities, or CEMA, chief and the officer in charge of the competition, said the event was designed to showcase skills that are becoming more and more important on the modern battlefield.

Electronic warfare is used to jam enemy signals, defeat unmanned aerial systems and disable improvised explosive devices.

Robinson said teams received an alert with a location grid early Monday.

“They knew the competition was going to start, but they didn’t know where,” he said. “We’re trying to stick to the traditions of the division: to be ready any time, any where.”

The three-day competition will include several classroom tests, but it began in the field.

Capt. Brian Mercado of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team said the navigation test was forcing the soldiers to use their electronic warfare systems in ways they haven’t before.

In past training, Mercado said, soldiers used the VMAX systems defensively on drop zones to protect paratroopers from enemy systems. But the navigational test showed that the systems also could be used to pinpoint an enemy force.

“This goes beyond our typical training,” Mercado said.

The system is the size of a large backpack with large antennas protruding overhead and can be jumped with a paratrooper. The lightweight system can detect, locate, monitor and jam radio frequency signals.

Each brigade combat team in the division has a CEMA cell. And each sent at least one team to compete, Robinson said. Each must be able to plan, troubleshoot and execute missions as they are provided.

“It’s a great opportunity,” he said. “Electronic warfare is a big part of the future and this is the tactical-level support we provide.”

Military editor Drew Brooks can be reached at [email protected] or 486-3567.

0

Vice chief: Women serve in every BCT battalion, but sexual …

Since the service lifted the final ban on women in direct-combat units[1] in 2016, more than 600 women have joined infantry and armor units[2], Gen. James McConville told an audience at the Army Women’s Summit on Capitol Hill.

“Every single infantry, armor and artillery battalion in every single active-duty brigade combat team has women assigned,” he said.

The Army is still tracking percentages as a gauge of its success with its Leaders First integration initiative, which transferred female officers and noncommissioned officers into the 82nd Airborne Division and 1st Cavalry Division, ahead of accepting graduated one-station training graduates last summer.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army’s infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

And, he added, 10 of those women are sporting Ranger tabs, since the course opened to women in 2015, with seven more in training now.

“I’d like to see the day in the near future where we no longer need to count percentages of individuals,” he said.

But women who do step up still face discrimination and, at the extreme, sexual assault from their fellow soldiers, and multiple audience members took the microphone to ask McConville about the Army’s efforts to prevent violence and mistreatment.

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McConville’s three children are active-duty soldiers, he said, including his daughter.

“She says it’s better than it used to be, but it’s no where near where it needs to be,” he said.

McConville encouraged survivors, men and women, to report, to give the Army an opportunity to prosecute predators to the fullest extent of the law.

“But they have to report, or we’re not going to fix it, as we go forward,” he said.

McConville likened sexual assault to friendly-fire negligence on the job, and suggested that commanders treat it the same way.

“If you’re on a range and you accidentally shot someone, and you hurt them, we would hold you accountable,” he said. “And we’d go through this whole process, and your fellow soldiers would look at you and say, ‘How could you do this to our fellow soldiers?’”

To combat assault and harassment within units, organizations need to start looking at them in the context of unit cohesiveness, he added.

“Sexual harassment and sexual assault is worse, because it’s intentional. It’s intentional fratricide,” he said. “Why would you commit intentional fratricide against one of your fellow soldiers?”

Similarly, the service’s Sexual Harassment and Assault Response and Prevention program should focus less on instilling fear of consequences in soldiers.

“What we have to do is get people to think beyond that,” he said. “What we need in the Army is cohesive teams of trusted professionals.”

Harassment and assault should be treated as readiness issues, he said.

“If you don’t treat them with dignity and respect, if you’re harassing them and assaulting them, what kind of organization are you going to have?” he said. “You’re an American soldier. You treat everyone with dignity and respect because that is the right thing to do.”

The Army has been encouraged by an increase in reporting numbers but a decrease in incidents over recent years, though conviction rates for both assaults and whistleblower retaliation remain low.

“We’re not there yet. We’ve got a long way to go,” McConville said.

References

  1. ^ direct-combat units (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ infantry and armor units (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Congress advances new sexual assault, harassment rules for the military (www.armytimes.com)
0

Vice chief: Women serve in every BCT battalion, but sexual …

Since the service lifted the final ban on women in direct-combat units[1] in 2016, more than 600 women have joined infantry and armor units[2], Gen. James McConville told an audience at the Army Women’s Summit on Capitol Hill.

“Every single infantry, armor and artillery battalion in every single active-duty brigade combat team has women assigned,” he said.

The Army is still tracking percentages as a gauge of its success with its Leaders First integration initiative, which transferred female officers and noncommissioned officers into the 82nd Airborne Division and 1st Cavalry Division, ahead of accepting graduated one-station training graduates last summer.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army’s infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

And, he added, 10 of those women are sporting Ranger tabs, since the course opened to women in 2015, with seven more in training now.

“I’d like to see the day in the near future where we no longer need to count percentages of individuals,” he said.

But women who do step up still face discrimination and, at the extreme, sexual assault from their fellow soldiers, and multiple audience members took the microphone to ask McConville about the Army’s efforts to prevent violence and mistreatment.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

McConville’s three children are active-duty soldiers, he said, including his daughter.

“She says it’s better than it used to be, but it’s no where near where it needs to be,” he said.

McConville encouraged survivors, men and women, to report, to give the Army an opportunity to prosecute predators to the fullest extent of the law.

“But they have to report, or we’re not going to fix it, as we go forward,” he said.

McConville likened sexual assault to friendly-fire negligence on the job, and suggested that commanders treat it the same way.

“If you’re on a range and you accidentally shot someone, and you hurt them, we would hold you accountable,” he said. “And we’d go through this whole process, and your fellow soldiers would look at you and say, ‘How could you do this to our fellow soldiers?’”

To combat assault and harassment within units, organizations need to start looking at them in the context of unit cohesiveness, he added.

“Sexual harassment and sexual assault is worse, because it’s intentional. It’s intentional fratricide,” he said. “Why would you commit intentional fratricide against one of your fellow soldiers?”

Similarly, the service’s Sexual Harassment and Assault Response and Prevention program should focus less on instilling fear of consequences in soldiers.

“What we have to do is get people to think beyond that,” he said. “What we need in the Army is cohesive teams of trusted professionals.”

Harassment and assault should be treated as readiness issues, he said.

“If you don’t treat them with dignity and respect, if you’re harassing them and assaulting them, what kind of organization are you going to have?” he said. “You’re an American soldier. You treat everyone with dignity and respect because that is the right thing to do.”

The Army has been encouraged by an increase in reporting numbers but a decrease in incidents over recent years, though conviction rates for both assaults and whistleblower retaliation remain low.

“We’re not there yet. We’ve got a long way to go,” McConville said.

References

  1. ^ direct-combat units (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ infantry and armor units (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Congress advances new sexual assault, harassment rules for the military (www.armytimes.com)
0

Vice chief: Women serve in every BCT battalion, but sexual …

Since the service lifted the final ban on women in direct-combat units[1] in 2016, more than 600 women have joined infantry and armor units[2], Gen. James McConville told an audience at the Army Women’s Summit on Capitol Hill.

“Every single infantry, armor and artillery battalion in every single active-duty brigade combat team has women assigned,” he said.

The Army is still tracking percentages as a gauge of its success with its Leaders First integration initiative, which transferred female officers and noncommissioned officers into the 82nd Airborne Division and 1st Cavalry Division, ahead of accepting graduated one-station training graduates last summer.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army’s infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

And, he added, 10 of those women are sporting Ranger tabs, since the course opened to women in 2015, with seven more in training now.

“I’d like to see the day in the near future where we no longer need to count percentages of individuals,” he said.

But women who do step up still face discrimination and, at the extreme, sexual assault from their fellow soldiers, and multiple audience members took the microphone to ask McConville about the Army’s efforts to prevent violence and mistreatment.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

McConville’s three children are active-duty soldiers, he said, including his daughter.

“She says it’s better than it used to be, but it’s no where near where it needs to be,” he said.

McConville encouraged survivors, men and women, to report, to give the Army an opportunity to prosecute predators to the fullest extent of the law.

“But they have to report, or we’re not going to fix it, as we go forward,” he said.

McConville likened sexual assault to friendly-fire negligence on the job, and suggested that commanders treat it the same way.

“If you’re on a range and you accidentally shot someone, and you hurt them, we would hold you accountable,” he said. “And we’d go through this whole process, and your fellow soldiers would look at you and say, ‘How could you do this to our fellow soldiers?’”

To combat assault and harassment within units, organizations need to start looking at them in the context of unit cohesiveness, he added.

“Sexual harassment and sexual assault is worse, because it’s intentional. It’s intentional fratricide,” he said. “Why would you commit intentional fratricide against one of your fellow soldiers?”

Similarly, the service’s Sexual Harassment and Assault Response and Prevention program should focus less on instilling fear of consequences in soldiers.

“What we have to do is get people to think beyond that,” he said. “What we need in the Army is cohesive teams of trusted professionals.”

Harassment and assault should be treated as readiness issues, he said.

“If you don’t treat them with dignity and respect, if you’re harassing them and assaulting them, what kind of organization are you going to have?” he said. “You’re an American soldier. You treat everyone with dignity and respect because that is the right thing to do.”

The Army has been encouraged by an increase in reporting numbers but a decrease in incidents over recent years, though conviction rates for both assaults and whistleblower retaliation remain low.

“We’re not there yet. We’ve got a long way to go,” McConville said.

References

  1. ^ direct-combat units (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ infantry and armor units (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Congress advances new sexual assault, harassment rules for the military (www.armytimes.com)
0

Vice chief: Women serve in every BCT battalion, but sexual …

Since the service lifted the final ban on women in direct-combat units[1] in 2016, more than 600 women have joined infantry and armor units[2], Gen. James McConville told an audience at the Army Women’s Summit on Capitol Hill.

“Every single infantry, armor and artillery battalion in every single active-duty brigade combat team has women assigned,” he said.

The Army is still tracking percentages as a gauge of its success with its Leaders First integration initiative, which transferred female officers and noncommissioned officers into the 82nd Airborne Division and 1st Cavalry Division, ahead of accepting graduated one-station training graduates last summer.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army’s infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

And, he added, 10 of those women are sporting Ranger tabs, since the course opened to women in 2015, with seven more in training now.

“I’d like to see the day in the near future where we no longer need to count percentages of individuals,” he said.

But women who do step up still face discrimination and, at the extreme, sexual assault from their fellow soldiers, and multiple audience members took the microphone to ask McConville about the Army’s efforts to prevent violence and mistreatment.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

McConville’s three children are active-duty soldiers, he said, including his daughter.

“She says it’s better than it used to be, but it’s no where near where it needs to be,” he said.

McConville encouraged survivors, men and women, to report, to give the Army an opportunity to prosecute predators to the fullest extent of the law.

“But they have to report, or we’re not going to fix it, as we go forward,” he said.

McConville likened sexual assault to friendly-fire negligence on the job, and suggested that commanders treat it the same way.

“If you’re on a range and you accidentally shot someone, and you hurt them, we would hold you accountable,” he said. “And we’d go through this whole process, and your fellow soldiers would look at you and say, ‘How could you do this to our fellow soldiers?’”

To combat assault and harassment within units, organizations need to start looking at them in the context of unit cohesiveness, he added.

“Sexual harassment and sexual assault is worse, because it’s intentional. It’s intentional fratricide,” he said. “Why would you commit intentional fratricide against one of your fellow soldiers?”

Similarly, the service’s Sexual Harassment and Assault Response and Prevention program should focus less on instilling fear of consequences in soldiers.

“What we have to do is get people to think beyond that,” he said. “What we need in the Army is cohesive teams of trusted professionals.”

Harassment and assault should be treated as readiness issues, he said.

“If you don’t treat them with dignity and respect, if you’re harassing them and assaulting them, what kind of organization are you going to have?” he said. “You’re an American soldier. You treat everyone with dignity and respect because that is the right thing to do.”

The Army has been encouraged by an increase in reporting numbers but a decrease in incidents over recent years, though conviction rates for both assaults and whistleblower retaliation remain low.

“We’re not there yet. We’ve got a long way to go,” McConville said.

References

  1. ^ direct-combat units (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ infantry and armor units (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Congress advances new sexual assault, harassment rules for the military (www.armytimes.com)
0

Vice chief: Women serve in every BCT battalion, but sexual harassment battle is far from over

Since the service lifted the final ban on women in direct-combat units[1] in 2016, more than 600 women have joined infantry and armor units[2], Gen. James McConville told an audience at the Army Women’s Summit on Capitol Hill.

“Every single infantry, armor and artillery battalion in every single active-duty brigade combat team has women assigned,” he said.

The Army is still tracking percentages as a gauge of its success with its Leaders First integration initiative, which transferred female officers and noncommissioned officers into the 82nd Airborne Division and 1st Cavalry Division, ahead of accepting graduated one-station training graduates last summer.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army’s infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

And, he added, 10 of those women are sporting Ranger tabs, since the course opened to women in 2015, with seven more in training now.

“I’d like to see the day in the near future where we no longer need to count percentages of individuals,” he said.

But women who do step up still face discrimination and, at the extreme, sexual assault from their fellow soldiers, and multiple audience members took the microphone to ask McConville about the Army’s efforts to prevent violence and mistreatment.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

McConville’s three children are active-duty soldiers, he said, including his daughter.

“She says it’s better than it used to be, but it’s no where near where it needs to be,” he said.

McConville encouraged survivors, men and women, to report, to give the Army an opportunity to prosecute predators to the fullest extent of the law.

“But they have to report, or we’re not going to fix it, as we go forward,” he said.

McConville likened sexual assault to friendly-fire negligence on the job, and suggested that commanders treat it the same way.

“If you’re on a range and you accidentally shot someone, and you hurt them, we would hold you accountable,” he said. “And we’d go through this whole process, and your fellow soldiers would look at you and say, ‘How could you do this to our fellow soldiers?’”

To combat assault and harassment within units, organizations need to start looking at them in the context of unit cohesiveness, he added.

“Sexual harassment and sexual assault is worse, because it’s intentional. It’s intentional fratricide,” he said. “Why would you commit intentional fratricide against one of your fellow soldiers?”

Similarly, the service’s Sexual Harassment and Assault Response and Prevention program should focus less on instilling fear of consequences in soldiers.

“What we have to do is get people to think beyond that,” he said. “What we need in the Army is cohesive teams of trusted professionals.”

Harassment and assault should be treated as readiness issues, he said.

“If you don’t treat them with dignity and respect, if you’re harassing them and assaulting them, what kind of organization are you going to have?” he said. “You’re an American soldier. You treat everyone with dignity and respect because that is the right thing to do.”

The Army has been encouraged by an increase in reporting numbers but a decrease in incidents over recent years, though conviction rates for both assaults and whistleblower retaliation remain low.

“We’re not there yet. We’ve got a long way to go,” McConville said.

References

  1. ^ direct-combat units (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ infantry and armor units (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Congress advances new sexual assault, harassment rules for the military (www.armytimes.com)
0

Vice chief: Women serve in every BCT battalion, but sexual harassment battle is far from over

Since the service lifted the final ban on women in direct-combat units[1] in 2016, more than 600 women have joined infantry and armor units[2], Gen. James McConville told an audience at the Army Women’s Summit on Capitol Hill.

“Every single infantry, armor and artillery battalion in every single active-duty brigade combat team has women assigned,” he said.

The Army is still tracking percentages as a gauge of its success with its Leaders First integration initiative, which transferred female officers and noncommissioned officers into the 82nd Airborne Division and 1st Cavalry Division, ahead of accepting graduated one-station training graduates last summer.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army’s infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

And, he added, 10 of those women are sporting Ranger tabs, since the course opened to women in 2015, with seven more in training now.

“I’d like to see the day in the near future where we no longer need to count percentages of individuals,” he said.

But women who do step up still face discrimination and, at the extreme, sexual assault from their fellow soldiers, and multiple audience members took the microphone to ask McConville about the Army’s efforts to prevent violence and mistreatment.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

McConville’s three children are active-duty soldiers, he said, including his daughter.

“She says it’s better than it used to be, but it’s no where near where it needs to be,” he said.

McConville encouraged survivors, men and women, to report, to give the Army an opportunity to prosecute predators to the fullest extent of the law.

“But they have to report, or we’re not going to fix it, as we go forward,” he said.

McConville likened sexual assault to friendly-fire negligence on the job, and suggested that commanders treat it the same way.

“If you’re on a range and you accidentally shot someone, and you hurt them, we would hold you accountable,” he said. “And we’d go through this whole process, and your fellow soldiers would look at you and say, ‘How could you do this to our fellow soldiers?’”

To combat assault and harassment within units, organizations need to start looking at them in the context of unit cohesiveness, he added.

“Sexual harassment and sexual assault is worse, because it’s intentional. It’s intentional fratricide,” he said. “Why would you commit intentional fratricide against one of your fellow soldiers?”

Similarly, the service’s Sexual Harassment and Assault Response and Prevention program should focus less on instilling fear of consequences in soldiers.

“What we have to do is get people to think beyond that,” he said. “What we need in the Army is cohesive teams of trusted professionals.”

Harassment and assault should be treated as readiness issues, he said.

“If you don’t treat them with dignity and respect, if you’re harassing them and assaulting them, what kind of organization are you going to have?” he said. “You’re an American soldier. You treat everyone with dignity and respect because that is the right thing to do.”

The Army has been encouraged by an increase in reporting numbers but a decrease in incidents over recent years, though conviction rates for both assaults and whistleblower retaliation remain low.

“We’re not there yet. We’ve got a long way to go,” McConville said.

References

  1. ^ direct-combat units (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ infantry and armor units (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Congress advances new sexual assault, harassment rules for the military (www.armytimes.com)
0

Vice chief: Women serve in every BCT battalion, but sexual …

Since the service lifted the final ban on women in direct-combat units[1] in 2016, more than 600 women have joined infantry and armor units[2], Gen. James McConville told an audience at the Army Women’s Summit on Capitol Hill.

“Every single infantry, armor and artillery battalion in every single active-duty brigade combat team has women assigned,” he said.

The Army is still tracking percentages as a gauge of its success with its Leaders First integration initiative, which transferred female officers and noncommissioned officers into the 82nd Airborne Division and 1st Cavalry Division, ahead of accepting graduated one-station training graduates last summer.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army’s infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

And, he added, 10 of those women are sporting Ranger tabs, since the course opened to women in 2015, with seven more in training now.

“I’d like to see the day in the near future where we no longer need to count percentages of individuals,” he said.

But women who do step up still face discrimination and, at the extreme, sexual assault from their fellow soldiers, and multiple audience members took the microphone to ask McConville about the Army’s efforts to prevent violence and mistreatment.

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McConville’s three children are active-duty soldiers, he said, including his daughter.

“She says it’s better than it used to be, but it’s no where near where it needs to be,” he said.

McConville encouraged survivors, men and women, to report, to give the Army an opportunity to prosecute predators to the fullest extent of the law.

“But they have to report, or we’re not going to fix it, as we go forward,” he said.

McConville likened sexual assault to friendly-fire negligence on the job, and suggested that commanders treat it the same way.

“If you’re on a range and you accidentally shot someone, and you hurt them, we would hold you accountable,” he said. “And we’d go through this whole process, and your fellow soldiers would look at you and say, ‘How could you do this to our fellow soldiers?’”

To combat assault and harassment within units, organizations need to start looking at them in the context of unit cohesiveness, he added.

“Sexual harassment and sexual assault is worse, because it’s intentional. It’s intentional fratricide,” he said. “Why would you commit intentional fratricide against one of your fellow soldiers?”

Similarly, the service’s Sexual Harassment and Assault Response and Prevention program should focus less on instilling fear of consequences in soldiers.

“What we have to do is get people to think beyond that,” he said. “What we need in the Army is cohesive teams of trusted professionals.”

Harassment and assault should be treated as readiness issues, he said.

“If you don’t treat them with dignity and respect, if you’re harassing them and assaulting them, what kind of organization are you going to have?” he said. “You’re an American soldier. You treat everyone with dignity and respect because that is the right thing to do.”

The Army has been encouraged by an increase in reporting numbers but a decrease in incidents over recent years, though conviction rates for both assaults and whistleblower retaliation remain low.

“We’re not there yet. We’ve got a long way to go,” McConville said.

References

  1. ^ direct-combat units (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ infantry and armor units (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Congress advances new sexual assault, harassment rules for the military (www.armytimes.com)