Tagged: life

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2nd ABCT, 3rd ID, wins Sullivan Cup tank competition at Fort Benning

The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
1 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
2 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
3 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
4 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
5 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]

FORT BENNING, Ga. — The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.

After several days of competition, the tank crews performed one final timed event May 4.

Staggered by their points placement on the morning of the last day, the tank crews ran a 1.7-mile route to Brave Rifles Field the morning of May 4. On the field, the crewmembers performed several tank-related physical and mental tasks. Crewmembers also completed five burpees between each station, and there was a five-burpee penalty for incorrect responses and failures on tasks.

After the completion of the final competitive event, tallies were made of the scores from throughout the competition. The top finishers in the Sullivan Cup were:

– 1st place: B Company, 3rd Battalion, 67th Armored Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, from Fort Stewart, Georgia
– 2nd place: C Company, 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division from Fort Riley, Kansas
– 3rd place: 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division from Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

Brig. Gen. David A. Lesperance, commandant of the U.S. Army Armor School at the Maneuver Center of Excellence, spoke at the competition’s closing ceremony.

“Never in my wildest imagination would I have guessed that it would have delivered what it did for army today,” said Lesperance. “They truly have identified the best tank crew and tank crews the Army has to offer today.”

The first day of competition included a stress shoot adapted specifically for tank crews and a ranked simulated combat maneuver exercise. On the second two days, the crews conducted a live-fire exercise and a situational training exercise. The scored events were meant to represent both what tank crews trained on and what they could expect in combat.

“What do we expect of a tank crew in our army today?” Lesperance asked rhetorically during the closing ceremony. “We expect that tank crew to be able to survive, maneuver to a point of positional advantage, to get our weapons into the fight and to deliver first-round lethality and have an effect on our target and have our target destroyed.”

Staff Sgt. Johnathan Werner, tank commander, Cpl. Justin Harris, gunner, Pvt. Brandon Zacher, loader, and Pvt. Dekken Sanders, driver, the winning tank crew from 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID, had only worked together for a few months before joining the competition.

“It’s pretty intense for the past roughly three months, but we gave it our all,” said Harris.

Werner described the competition as “fierce.”

“This is stuff that we do on a day-to-day basis — tanker grade gunnery, maneuvering — this is our job,” said Werner. “But when you put everyone in one area, the best of the best you possibly in the entire world, and then you compete and you have a bunch of alpha males, it kind of speaks for itself.”

Werner echoed Lesperance’s belief in the real-life use of the training they received during the competition.

“The way they facilitated the training, just by the book, the way they did the props for the gunnery, the way they did the STX training and the stress shoot, it was a little more realistic for combat engagement,” said Werner. “We should be able to take that back to the units and implement that on a lower level, not necessarily just for competitors. But if we can do this worldwide and have the worldwide training, the way the Army can, it’s what we really need to work toward.”

Both Zacher and Sanders, who have been in the Army for less than a year, found it strange to return to Fort Benning after finishing their basic training here. Sanders described the experience as “surreal.” Zacher appreciated seeing his trainers.

“It’s been pretty great seeing some of our old drill sergeants and shaking their hands,” said Zacher. “They’ve been rooting for us, so it feels great.”

To see photos from the 2018 Sullivan Cup, visit “Photo Album” in the “Related Links” section on this page.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
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Senators lobby to bring new armored brigade team to Texas …

U.S. Senators Ted Cruz and John Cornyn sent a letter Monday to Secretary of the Army Mark Esper requesting the Army relocate a newly-designated armored brigade combat team to either Fort Hood or Fort Bliss.

The Army’s 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, currently located at Fort Carson, Colorado, is in the process of conversion from an infantry brigade combat team to an armored brigade combat team. The two Texas Army installations already have the training ranges necessary to prepare an armored brigade combat team for deployment.

“We write regarding the conversion of the Army’s 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division from an infantry brigade combat team to an armored brigade combat team,” the senators wrote. “As this conversion occurs, we also write to express our strong support for the relocation of the 2nd Brigade from Fort Carson, Colorado to one of Texas’s premier armor installations. The conversion of an infantry brigade combat team to an armored brigade combat team is a daunting task. Nevertheless, as you look across the Army, Fort Hood and Fort Bliss stand out as hosts for a unit of this size and composition.”

Both installations are equipped with the infrastructure necessary to support the rapid deployment and redeployment of armored brigades, the letter stated. Fort Hood and Fort Bliss both have rail access, airfields capable of handling any size aircraft needed for rapid air transportation of personnel and equipment and the capacity to host an additional brigade.

The letter also touted the “superb quality of life including affordable housing, military friendly communities, recreational activities, and easy access to services” for family members. “Over the years, our installations and the surrounding communities have worked together to identify and provide the best available resources for soldiers and their families assigned to the region.”

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Tyler police team up with local shelter to try to combat homelessness

TYLER, TX (KLTV) –

Police all over the country are facing a tough new challenge with the homeless population; enforcing laws but still being sensitive to quality of life.

“Just bad choice after bad choice, addictions, drugs, alcohol,” Emiley Plunkett says.

Emiley Plunkett had been on the streets for eight years when Tyler police officer Johnny Green found her in a homeless camp. She’s now registered as a Texas citizen, and on track to marrying her husband-to-be.

The Tyler Police Department has partnered with the Hiway 80 Rescue Mission, a nonprofit that provides food, clothing, computer access and for most, housing.

“I care for most of these people and I just want to see the best for them, I want to push them in that right direction to get them off the streets,” Officer Green says.

The department just recently donated 1,500 pounds of non-perishable food.

Police officers are assigned to specific areas in the city, where they go to homeless camps and interact with people staying there. If the camp violates property laws, the officers find them a shelter to stay in, instead of arresting them on the spot.

“That’s been really nice for those who are homeless who would maybe sometimes be afraid of the police, to see them as a resource and as a friend,” Hiway 80 Rescue Mission Director Dawn Moltzan says.

The mission’s work is supported entirely through donations, and they say any help of volunteer work is appreciated[1].

Copyright 2018 KLTV. All rights reserved.[2]

0

Tyler police team up with local shelter to try to combat homelessness

TYLER, TX (KLTV) –

Police all over the country are facing a tough new challenge with the homeless population; enforcing laws but still being sensitive to quality of life.

“Just bad choice after bad choice, addictions, drugs, alcohol,” Emiley Plunkett says.

Emiley Plunkett had been on the streets for eight years when Tyler police officer Johnny Green found her in a homeless camp. She’s now registered as a Texas citizen, and on track to marrying her husband-to-be.

The Tyler Police Department has partnered with the Hiway 80 Rescue Mission, a nonprofit that provides food, clothing, computer access and for most, housing.

“I care for most of these people and I just want to see the best for them, I want to push them in that right direction to get them off the streets,” Officer Green says.

The department just recently donated 1,500 pounds of non-perishable food.

Police officers are assigned to specific areas in the city, where they go to homeless camps and interact with people staying there. If the camp violates property laws, the officers find them a shelter to stay in, instead of arresting them on the spot.

“That’s been really nice for those who are homeless who would maybe sometimes be afraid of the police, to see them as a resource and as a friend,” Hiway 80 Rescue Mission Director Dawn Moltzan says.

The mission’s work is supported entirely through donations, and they say any help of volunteer work is appreciated[1].

Copyright 2018 KLTV. All rights reserved.[2]

0

Troopers attend 1st Past and Present Garryowen Reunion

KEMPNER — More than 400 past and present troopers of the 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment “Garryowen,” gathered Saturday night for a first-of-a-kind Past and Present Garryowen Reunion at the Kempner Veterans of Foreign Wars post.

The unit, which was established July 28, 1866, is part of the 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, and is most well-known for its participation in the Battle of Little Big Horn under the command of Lt. Col. George A. Custer and for its victory against a vastly superior force during the Vietnam War at the IA Drang Valley under the command of Lt. Col. Hal Moore — a victory later portrayed in the Mel Gibson movie “We Were Soldiers.”

The unit’s history, stretching from the troopers’ bravery during the Indian Wars through countless victories in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Operation Desert Storm and into actions in Iraq during the War on Terror, prompted current and former members of the unit to bring everyone together to help foster the deep pride shared by the unit’s alumni in the newest generation of “Garryowen” troopers.

“I love this. I think this is great,” said Sgt. Janna M. Trevino, a combat medic with the squadron’s Headquarters and Headquarters Troop. “It’s inspiring. A lot of us are new to a (cavalry) unit and have no idea how the cavalry is run. To see all of these veterans and see everyone get together is great — it makes us want to stay motivated and positive while we do our work.”

Trevino, who sang the national anthem at the start of the ceremonies, said watching the interaction between young soldiers and the alumni troopers who served as far back as the Korean War was amazing.

“This is a very fast-paced unit. … The camaraderie is different. This is the type of stuff we need,” she said, adding that she would love to do something similar and more often in order to help foster a sense of pride for the unit within the newest troops who had never served with “Garryowen” before.

“The new privates who have just gotten here have got to experience this,” Trevino said. “Being able to see people who have so much experience in the military. … This is just so great.”

Lt. Gen. Paul Funk, III Corps and Fort Hood commander and a former “Garryowen” commander, even sent a video to the troopers from the Middle East, where he currently command Operation Inherent Resolve — the international coalition to defeat the Islamic State.

“I am even more proud I can hold my head high and say that I am a Garryowen trooper, just like you,” Funk said in the video. “All Garryowen troopers have one thing in common — tenacity, the single most important trait of a trooper. That fixed resolve not to quit when things get tough.”

Retired Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III, a former command sergeant major for the squadron and the 14th sergeant major of the Army, also offered some words of encouragement for all the troopers at the event, both past and present.

“My time in 1/7 Cav for me was the most pivotal and most memorable part of my military career,” he said. “A lot of people ask me, ‘do you miss the Army?’ Hell no, I do not. What I do miss is you. It’s that blood we shared over in Iraq and unfortunately the lives we lost and those who suffer from the visible wounds of war and those who suffer from invisible wounds.

“I just want to tell each and every one of you, thank you for helping to shape my life and for teaching me one of the most important things — that honor is the most important value,” Chandler added. “It’s what makes Garryowen, the 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, the pride of not only the 1st Cavalry Division, but as far as I’m concerned, the rest of the United States Army.”

Plans have already begun for the 2019 reunion, which will occur once the unit returns from an upcoming deployment to Europe with the 1st Brigade.

0

Troopers attend 1st Past and Present Garryowen Reunion

KEMPNER — More than 400 past and present troopers of the 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment “Garryowen,” gathered Saturday night for a first-of-a-kind Past and Present Garryowen Reunion at the Kempner Veterans of Foreign Wars post.

The unit, which was established July 28, 1866, is part of the 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, and is most well-known for its participation in the Battle of Little Big Horn under the command of Lt. Col. George A. Custer and for its victory against a vastly superior force during the Vietnam War at the IA Drang Valley under the command of Lt. Col. Hal Moore — a victory later portrayed in the Mel Gibson movie “We Were Soldiers.”

The unit’s history, stretching from the troopers’ bravery during the Indian Wars through countless victories in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Operation Desert Storm and into actions in Iraq during the War on Terror, prompted current and former members of the unit to bring everyone together to help foster the deep pride shared by the unit’s alumni in the newest generation of “Garryowen” troopers.

“I love this. I think this is great,” said Sgt. Janna M. Trevino, a combat medic with the squadron’s Headquarters and Headquarters Troop. “It’s inspiring. A lot of us are new to a (cavalry) unit and have no idea how the cavalry is run. To see all of these veterans and see everyone get together is great — it makes us want to stay motivated and positive while we do our work.”

Trevino, who sang the national anthem at the start of the ceremonies, said watching the interaction between young soldiers and the alumni troopers who served as far back as the Korean War was amazing.

“This is a very fast-paced unit. … The camaraderie is different. This is the type of stuff we need,” she said, adding that she would love to do something similar and more often in order to help foster a sense of pride for the unit within the newest troops who had never served with “Garryowen” before.

“The new privates who have just gotten here have got to experience this,” Trevino said. “Being able to see people who have so much experience in the military. … This is just so great.”

Lt. Gen. Paul Funk, III Corps and Fort Hood commander and a former “Garryowen” commander, even sent a video to the troopers from the Middle East, where he currently command Operation Inherent Resolve — the international coalition to defeat the Islamic State.

“I am even more proud I can hold my head high and say that I am a Garryowen trooper, just like you,” Funk said in the video. “All Garryowen troopers have one thing in common — tenacity, the single most important trait of a trooper. That fixed resolve not to quit when things get tough.”

Retired Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III, a former command sergeant major for the squadron and the 14th sergeant major of the Army, also offered some words of encouragement for all the troopers at the event, both past and present.

“My time in 1/7 Cav for me was the most pivotal and most memorable part of my military career,” he said. “A lot of people ask me, ‘do you miss the Army?’ Hell no, I do not. What I do miss is you. It’s that blood we shared over in Iraq and unfortunately the lives we lost and those who suffer from the visible wounds of war and those who suffer from invisible wounds.

“I just want to tell each and every one of you, thank you for helping to shape my life and for teaching me one of the most important things — that honor is the most important value,” Chandler added. “It’s what makes Garryowen, the 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, the pride of not only the 1st Cavalry Division, but as far as I’m concerned, the rest of the United States Army.”

Plans have already begun for the 2019 reunion, which will occur once the unit returns from an upcoming deployment to Europe with the 1st Brigade.

0

'First-of-its-kind' training: 2 brigades head from Camp Shelby to Fort Bliss

From staff reports Published 3:01 p.m. CT March 10, 2018

CLOSE

The Mississippi National Guard’s 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team and First Army’s 177th Armored Brigade practice remobilization training at Camp Shelby on Monday. The 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team will travel to Fort Bliss, Texas afterwards to continue their training. Susan Broadbridge/Hattiesburg American

Two Mississippi-based brigades are heading to Fort Bliss, Texas, to train with each other in a first-of-its-kind exercise.

First Army’s 177th Armored Brigade from Camp Shelby will advise and assist the Mississippi National Guard’s 155th Armored  Brigade Combat Team out of Tupelo.

“The 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team will be the first Army National Guard Armored Brigade Combat Team to train and deploy prepared for decisive action operations that include operating all along the continuum of conflict,” said Col. Jack Vantress, 177th Armored Brigade commander, in an email. “The 155th has been working toward this end for over three years, and over the next three months, we in the 177th are honored to advise and assist them as they make final preparations for their upcoming deployment.”

The number of soldiers, the large-scale exercises and the closeness of the two brigades make this training mission unique.

Most recently, the two brigades have been training at Camp Shelby in preparation for their move to Fort Bliss.

“Both our formations totaling near 4,300 soldiers have been working together to plan and execute training that will prepare them for deployment,” Vantress said.

More: Camp Shelby, Homeland Security test unmanned aircraft[1]

The entirety of the 177th, with augmentation from First Army Division East, is assembling at Fort Bliss and will partner with the 155th for nearly 90 days.

“This is not a normal event,” Vantress said. “It is a first-of-its-kind to insure the 155th is as prepared as can be to deploy on a contingency mission.”

The 155th is preparing for an upcoming deployment to the Middle East in support of Operation Spartan Shield.

Story continues below photo gallery.

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

[2][3]

Fort Bliss was chosen for the training because it is the only suitable installation, Vantress said.

“We are conducting the training at Fort Bliss due to the size of the training requirement,” he said. “Fort Bliss is one of only a few installations in the United States that can train an Armored Brigade Combat Team with its vast expanse of training areas as well as the necessary number and sizes of live fire ranges for tanks and artillery.

“The environment also replicates the environment the 155th will deploy to and conduct their operations.”

More: Country’s only Unmanned Aircraft Regional Flight Center opens at Camp Shelby[4]

Vantress said the two brigades have been living and working together at Camp Shelby for some time.

“Partnering with the 155th is special for our brigade because they are the hometown partners,” Vantress said. “Our brigade partners with units across seven primary states  and two territories, so the opportunity to work with a partner that we are very close to and live amongst is exciting.”

Vantress said the soldiers of the 177th are technical experts with years of deployment experience. After assisting the 155th, they will return to serve other Army National Guard and Army Reserve partners for the foreseeable future.

“Our reserve force is more important now than it ever was to generate a force capable of deterring our nation’s enemies, and if called upon, defeating our adversaries to protect the American people and our way of life,” Vantress said.

Click it

On Facebook 

177th Armored Brigade: https://www.facebook.com/177ARBde/?ref=br_rs[5]

155th Armored Brigade Combat Team: https://www.facebook.com/155ABCT/[6]

On Twitter

177th Armored Brigade: @177th_BDE_CDR

155th Armored Brigade Combat Team: @155ABCT

 

Read or Share this story: http://hatne.ws/2Gf9zpI

References

  1. ^ Camp Shelby, Homeland Security test unmanned aircraft (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  2. ^ (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  3. ^ (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  4. ^ Country’s only Unmanned Aircraft Regional Flight Center opens at Camp Shelby (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  5. ^ https://www.facebook.com/177ARBde/?ref=br_rs (www.facebook.com)
  6. ^ https://www.facebook.com/155ABCT/ (www.facebook.com)
0

'First-of-its-kind' training: 2 brigades head from Camp Shelby to Fort Bliss

From staff reports Published 3:01 p.m. CT March 10, 2018

CLOSE

The Mississippi National Guard’s 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team and First Army’s 177th Armored Brigade practice remobilization training at Camp Shelby on Monday. The 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team will travel to Fort Bliss, Texas afterwards to continue their training. Susan Broadbridge/Hattiesburg American

Two Mississippi-based brigades are heading to Fort Bliss, Texas, to train with each other in a first-of-its-kind exercise.

First Army’s 177th Armored Brigade from Camp Shelby will advise and assist the Mississippi National Guard’s 155th Armored  Brigade Combat Team out of Tupelo.

“The 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team will be the first Army National Guard Armored Brigade Combat Team to train and deploy prepared for decisive action operations that include operating all along the continuum of conflict,” said Col. Jack Vantress, 177th Armored Brigade commander, in an email. “The 155th has been working toward this end for over three years, and over the next three months, we in the 177th are honored to advise and assist them as they make final preparations for their upcoming deployment.”

The number of soldiers, the large-scale exercises and the closeness of the two brigades make this training mission unique.

Most recently, the two brigades have been training at Camp Shelby in preparation for their move to Fort Bliss.

“Both our formations totaling near 4,300 soldiers have been working together to plan and execute training that will prepare them for deployment,” Vantress said.

More: Camp Shelby, Homeland Security test unmanned aircraft[1]

The entirety of the 177th, with augmentation from First Army Division East, is assembling at Fort Bliss and will partner with the 155th for nearly 90 days.

“This is not a normal event,” Vantress said. “It is a first-of-its-kind to insure the 155th is as prepared as can be to deploy on a contingency mission.”

The 155th is preparing for an upcoming deployment to the Middle East in support of Operation Spartan Shield.

Story continues below photo gallery.

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

[2][3]

Fort Bliss was chosen for the training because it is the only suitable installation, Vantress said.

“We are conducting the training at Fort Bliss due to the size of the training requirement,” he said. “Fort Bliss is one of only a few installations in the United States that can train an Armored Brigade Combat Team with its vast expanse of training areas as well as the necessary number and sizes of live fire ranges for tanks and artillery.

“The environment also replicates the environment the 155th will deploy to and conduct their operations.”

More: Country’s only Unmanned Aircraft Regional Flight Center opens at Camp Shelby[4]

Vantress said the two brigades have been living and working together at Camp Shelby for some time.

“Partnering with the 155th is special for our brigade because they are the hometown partners,” Vantress said. “Our brigade partners with units across seven primary states  and two territories, so the opportunity to work with a partner that we are very close to and live amongst is exciting.”

Vantress said the soldiers of the 177th are technical experts with years of deployment experience. After assisting the 155th, they will return to serve other Army National Guard and Army Reserve partners for the foreseeable future.

“Our reserve force is more important now than it ever was to generate a force capable of deterring our nation’s enemies, and if called upon, defeating our adversaries to protect the American people and our way of life,” Vantress said.

Click it

On Facebook 

177th Armored Brigade: https://www.facebook.com/177ARBde/?ref=br_rs[5]

155th Armored Brigade Combat Team: https://www.facebook.com/155ABCT/[6]

On Twitter

177th Armored Brigade: @177th_BDE_CDR

155th Armored Brigade Combat Team: @155ABCT

 

Read or Share this story: http://hatne.ws/2Gf9zpI

References

  1. ^ Camp Shelby, Homeland Security test unmanned aircraft (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  2. ^ (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  3. ^ (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  4. ^ Country’s only Unmanned Aircraft Regional Flight Center opens at Camp Shelby (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  5. ^ https://www.facebook.com/177ARBde/?ref=br_rs (www.facebook.com)
  6. ^ https://www.facebook.com/155ABCT/ (www.facebook.com)
0

'First-of-its-kind' training: 2 brigades head from Camp Shelby to Fort Bliss

From staff reports Published 3:01 p.m. CT March 10, 2018

CLOSE

The Mississippi National Guard’s 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team and First Army’s 177th Armored Brigade practice remobilization training at Camp Shelby on Monday. The 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team will travel to Fort Bliss, Texas afterwards to continue their training. Susan Broadbridge/Hattiesburg American

Two Mississippi-based brigades are heading to Fort Bliss, Texas, to train with each other in a first-of-its-kind exercise.

First Army’s 177th Armored Brigade from Camp Shelby will advise and assist the Mississippi National Guard’s 155th Armored  Brigade Combat Team out of Tupelo.

“The 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team will be the first Army National Guard Armored Brigade Combat Team to train and deploy prepared for decisive action operations that include operating all along the continuum of conflict,” said Col. Jack Vantress, 177th Armored Brigade commander, in an email. “The 155th has been working toward this end for over three years, and over the next three months, we in the 177th are honored to advise and assist them as they make final preparations for their upcoming deployment.”

The number of soldiers, the large-scale exercises and the closeness of the two brigades make this training mission unique.

Most recently, the two brigades have been training at Camp Shelby in preparation for their move to Fort Bliss.

“Both our formations totaling near 4,300 soldiers have been working together to plan and execute training that will prepare them for deployment,” Vantress said.

More: Camp Shelby, Homeland Security test unmanned aircraft[1]

The entirety of the 177th, with augmentation from First Army Division East, is assembling at Fort Bliss and will partner with the 155th for nearly 90 days.

“This is not a normal event,” Vantress said. “It is a first-of-its-kind to insure the 155th is as prepared as can be to deploy on a contingency mission.”

The 155th is preparing for an upcoming deployment to the Middle East in support of Operation Spartan Shield.

Story continues below photo gallery.

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

[2][3]

Fort Bliss was chosen for the training because it is the only suitable installation, Vantress said.

“We are conducting the training at Fort Bliss due to the size of the training requirement,” he said. “Fort Bliss is one of only a few installations in the United States that can train an Armored Brigade Combat Team with its vast expanse of training areas as well as the necessary number and sizes of live fire ranges for tanks and artillery.

“The environment also replicates the environment the 155th will deploy to and conduct their operations.”

More: Country’s only Unmanned Aircraft Regional Flight Center opens at Camp Shelby[4]

Vantress said the two brigades have been living and working together at Camp Shelby for some time.

“Partnering with the 155th is special for our brigade because they are the hometown partners,” Vantress said. “Our brigade partners with units across seven primary states  and two territories, so the opportunity to work with a partner that we are very close to and live amongst is exciting.”

Vantress said the soldiers of the 177th are technical experts with years of deployment experience. After assisting the 155th, they will return to serve other Army National Guard and Army Reserve partners for the foreseeable future.

“Our reserve force is more important now than it ever was to generate a force capable of deterring our nation’s enemies, and if called upon, defeating our adversaries to protect the American people and our way of life,” Vantress said.

Click it

On Facebook 

177th Armored Brigade: https://www.facebook.com/177ARBde/?ref=br_rs[5]

155th Armored Brigade Combat Team: https://www.facebook.com/155ABCT/[6]

On Twitter

177th Armored Brigade: @177th_BDE_CDR

155th Armored Brigade Combat Team: @155ABCT

 

Read or Share this story: http://hatne.ws/2Gf9zpI

References

  1. ^ Camp Shelby, Homeland Security test unmanned aircraft (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  2. ^ (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  3. ^ (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  4. ^ Country’s only Unmanned Aircraft Regional Flight Center opens at Camp Shelby (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  5. ^ https://www.facebook.com/177ARBde/?ref=br_rs (www.facebook.com)
  6. ^ https://www.facebook.com/155ABCT/ (www.facebook.com)
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'First-of-its-kind' training: 2 brigades head from Camp Shelby to Fort Bliss

From staff reports Published 3:01 p.m. CT March 10, 2018

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The Mississippi National Guard’s 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team and First Army’s 177th Armored Brigade practice remobilization training at Camp Shelby on Monday. The 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team will travel to Fort Bliss, Texas afterwards to continue their training. Susan Broadbridge/Hattiesburg American

Two Mississippi-based brigades are heading to Fort Bliss, Texas, to train with each other in a first-of-its-kind exercise.

First Army’s 177th Armored Brigade from Camp Shelby will advise and assist the Mississippi National Guard’s 155th Armored  Brigade Combat Team out of Tupelo.

“The 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team will be the first Army National Guard Armored Brigade Combat Team to train and deploy prepared for decisive action operations that include operating all along the continuum of conflict,” said Col. Jack Vantress, 177th Armored Brigade commander, in an email. “The 155th has been working toward this end for over three years, and over the next three months, we in the 177th are honored to advise and assist them as they make final preparations for their upcoming deployment.”

The number of soldiers, the large-scale exercises and the closeness of the two brigades make this training mission unique.

Most recently, the two brigades have been training at Camp Shelby in preparation for their move to Fort Bliss.

“Both our formations totaling near 4,300 soldiers have been working together to plan and execute training that will prepare them for deployment,” Vantress said.

More: Camp Shelby, Homeland Security test unmanned aircraft[1]

The entirety of the 177th, with augmentation from First Army Division East, is assembling at Fort Bliss and will partner with the 155th for nearly 90 days.

“This is not a normal event,” Vantress said. “It is a first-of-its-kind to insure the 155th is as prepared as can be to deploy on a contingency mission.”

The 155th is preparing for an upcoming deployment to the Middle East in support of Operation Spartan Shield.

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Fort Bliss was chosen for the training because it is the only suitable installation, Vantress said.

“We are conducting the training at Fort Bliss due to the size of the training requirement,” he said. “Fort Bliss is one of only a few installations in the United States that can train an Armored Brigade Combat Team with its vast expanse of training areas as well as the necessary number and sizes of live fire ranges for tanks and artillery.

“The environment also replicates the environment the 155th will deploy to and conduct their operations.”

More: Country’s only Unmanned Aircraft Regional Flight Center opens at Camp Shelby[4]

Vantress said the two brigades have been living and working together at Camp Shelby for some time.

“Partnering with the 155th is special for our brigade because they are the hometown partners,” Vantress said. “Our brigade partners with units across seven primary states  and two territories, so the opportunity to work with a partner that we are very close to and live amongst is exciting.”

Vantress said the soldiers of the 177th are technical experts with years of deployment experience. After assisting the 155th, they will return to serve other Army National Guard and Army Reserve partners for the foreseeable future.

“Our reserve force is more important now than it ever was to generate a force capable of deterring our nation’s enemies, and if called upon, defeating our adversaries to protect the American people and our way of life,” Vantress said.

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On Facebook 

177th Armored Brigade: https://www.facebook.com/177ARBde/?ref=br_rs[5]

155th Armored Brigade Combat Team: https://www.facebook.com/155ABCT/[6]

On Twitter

177th Armored Brigade: @177th_BDE_CDR

155th Armored Brigade Combat Team: @155ABCT

 

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References

  1. ^ Camp Shelby, Homeland Security test unmanned aircraft (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  2. ^ (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  3. ^ (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  4. ^ Country’s only Unmanned Aircraft Regional Flight Center opens at Camp Shelby (www.hattiesburgamerican.com)
  5. ^ https://www.facebook.com/177ARBde/?ref=br_rs (www.facebook.com)
  6. ^ https://www.facebook.com/155ABCT/ (www.facebook.com)