Tagged: feb

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Alaska Troops Hold Annual Winter Games

FORT WAINWRIGHT, Alaska, March 6, 2018 —

As temperatures plummeted into the negative ’20s here, 17 teams of 10 soldiers each from across U.S. Army Alaska and the Canadian Army competed in a series of cold weather and mountainous warrior tasks Feb. 27-March 2. [1]

Team 15 from 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, prevailed, scoring the highest point total.[2]

The annual U.S. Army Alaska Winter Games were held this year at the Birch Hill Ski and Snowboard Area here. Events included a biathlon, a written test, ahkio — runnerless sledge towing — shooting on snowshoes, casualty evacuation and treatment, tent setup, downhill skiing, skijoring — which is skiing while pulled, in this case by a vehicle, but a horse or dog team can also be used — and land navigation.[3]

“It’s important because it helps individuals training on these specific events, that they can then take back to their units,” said Army 1st Lt. Michael McKeon, the winning team’s leader and a platoon leader with 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Like for us, we’re the ski platoon for our troop, and we didn’t get really good at it until we trained for this competition,” he said. “Now, we’re excellent at skiing and can take that back to our unit.”

Building Arctic Skills

The games, as with any other military competition, serves a variety of purposes.

“This process started three-and-a-half to four months ago,” said Army 1st Lt. Christopher Rainsberger, the Arctic Warrior Games officer in charge and a platoon leader with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Events like this are extremely important for [U.S. Army Alaska] because one of the main things that the units up here focus on is Arctic mobility and Arctic skills,” Rainsberger said. “These events are an excellent way to train for that and to show how well your squad or your team is proficient at skiing, setting up 10-man tents and shooting in Arctic conditions under stress.”

“All the effort and the heart the teams put into practicing really shows the teams are competing,” he added. “The teams practice weeks and months before the event, and there’s a lot of camaraderie with those teams.”

References

  1. ^ U.S. Army Alaska (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ 25th Infantry Division (www.25idl.army.mil)
  3. ^ here (www.wainwright.army.mil)
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Alaska Troops Hold Annual Winter Games > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF …

FORT WAINWRIGHT, Alaska, March 6, 2018 —

As temperatures plummeted into the negative ’20s here, 17 teams of 10 soldiers each from across U.S. Army Alaska and the Canadian Army competed in a series of cold weather and mountainous warrior tasks Feb. 27-March 2. [1]

Team 15 from 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, prevailed, scoring the highest point total.[2]

The annual U.S. Army Alaska Winter Games were held this year at the Birch Hill Ski and Snowboard Area here. Events included a biathlon, a written test, ahkio — runnerless sledge towing — shooting on snowshoes, casualty evacuation and treatment, tent setup, downhill skiing, skijoring — which is skiing while pulled, in this case by a vehicle, but a horse or dog team can also be used — and land navigation.[3]

“It’s important because it helps individuals training on these specific events, that they can then take back to their units,” said Army 1st Lt. Michael McKeon, the winning team’s leader and a platoon leader with 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Like for us, we’re the ski platoon for our troop, and we didn’t get really good at it until we trained for this competition,” he said. “Now, we’re excellent at skiing and can take that back to our unit.”

Building Arctic Skills

The games, as with any other military competition, serves a variety of purposes.

“This process started three-and-a-half to four months ago,” said Army 1st Lt. Christopher Rainsberger, the Arctic Warrior Games officer in charge and a platoon leader with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Events like this are extremely important for [U.S. Army Alaska] because one of the main things that the units up here focus on is Arctic mobility and Arctic skills,” Rainsberger said. “These events are an excellent way to train for that and to show how well your squad or your team is proficient at skiing, setting up 10-man tents and shooting in Arctic conditions under stress.”

“All the effort and the heart the teams put into practicing really shows the teams are competing,” he added. “The teams practice weeks and months before the event, and there’s a lot of camaraderie with those teams.”

References

  1. ^ U.S. Army Alaska (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ 25th Infantry Division (www.25idl.army.mil)
  3. ^ here (www.wainwright.army.mil)
0

Alaska Troops Hold Annual Winter Games > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF …

FORT WAINWRIGHT, Alaska, March 6, 2018 —

As temperatures plummeted into the negative ’20s here, 17 teams of 10 soldiers each from across U.S. Army Alaska and the Canadian Army competed in a series of cold weather and mountainous warrior tasks Feb. 27-March 2. [1]

Team 15 from 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, prevailed, scoring the highest point total.[2]

The annual U.S. Army Alaska Winter Games were held this year at the Birch Hill Ski and Snowboard Area here. Events included a biathlon, a written test, ahkio — runnerless sledge towing — shooting on snowshoes, casualty evacuation and treatment, tent setup, downhill skiing, skijoring — which is skiing while pulled, in this case by a vehicle, but a horse or dog team can also be used — and land navigation.[3]

“It’s important because it helps individuals training on these specific events, that they can then take back to their units,” said Army 1st Lt. Michael McKeon, the winning team’s leader and a platoon leader with 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Like for us, we’re the ski platoon for our troop, and we didn’t get really good at it until we trained for this competition,” he said. “Now, we’re excellent at skiing and can take that back to our unit.”

Building Arctic Skills

The games, as with any other military competition, serves a variety of purposes.

“This process started three-and-a-half to four months ago,” said Army 1st Lt. Christopher Rainsberger, the Arctic Warrior Games officer in charge and a platoon leader with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Events like this are extremely important for [U.S. Army Alaska] because one of the main things that the units up here focus on is Arctic mobility and Arctic skills,” Rainsberger said. “These events are an excellent way to train for that and to show how well your squad or your team is proficient at skiing, setting up 10-man tents and shooting in Arctic conditions under stress.”

“All the effort and the heart the teams put into practicing really shows the teams are competing,” he added. “The teams practice weeks and months before the event, and there’s a lot of camaraderie with those teams.”

References

  1. ^ U.S. Army Alaska (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ 25th Infantry Division (www.25idl.army.mil)
  3. ^ here (www.wainwright.army.mil)
0

Alaska Troops Hold Annual Winter Games

FORT WAINWRIGHT, Alaska, March 6, 2018 —

As temperatures plummeted into the negative ’20s here, 17 teams of 10 soldiers each from across U.S. Army Alaska and the Canadian Army competed in a series of cold weather and mountainous warrior tasks Feb. 27-March 2. [1]

Team 15 from 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, prevailed, scoring the highest point total.[2]

The annual U.S. Army Alaska Winter Games were held this year at the Birch Hill Ski and Snowboard Area here. Events included a biathlon, a written test, ahkio — runnerless sledge towing — shooting on snowshoes, casualty evacuation and treatment, tent setup, downhill skiing, skijoring — which is skiing while pulled, in this case by a vehicle, but a horse or dog team can also be used — and land navigation.[3]

“It’s important because it helps individuals training on these specific events, that they can then take back to their units,” said Army 1st Lt. Michael McKeon, the winning team’s leader and a platoon leader with 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Like for us, we’re the ski platoon for our troop, and we didn’t get really good at it until we trained for this competition,” he said. “Now, we’re excellent at skiing and can take that back to our unit.”

Building Arctic Skills

The games, as with any other military competition, serves a variety of purposes.

“This process started three-and-a-half to four months ago,” said Army 1st Lt. Christopher Rainsberger, the Arctic Warrior Games officer in charge and a platoon leader with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Events like this are extremely important for [U.S. Army Alaska] because one of the main things that the units up here focus on is Arctic mobility and Arctic skills,” Rainsberger said. “These events are an excellent way to train for that and to show how well your squad or your team is proficient at skiing, setting up 10-man tents and shooting in Arctic conditions under stress.”

“All the effort and the heart the teams put into practicing really shows the teams are competing,” he added. “The teams practice weeks and months before the event, and there’s a lot of camaraderie with those teams.”

References

  1. ^ U.S. Army Alaska (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ 25th Infantry Division (www.25idl.army.mil)
  3. ^ here (www.wainwright.army.mil)
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Russian Military Transport Plane Crashes in Syria, Killing 39

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MOSCOW — A Russian military transport plane carrying 33 passengers and six crew members crashed on landing at an air base in Syria on Tuesday, killing all on board, the Russian Defense Ministry said.

Initial reports ruled out a terrorist attack against the aircraft, an Antonov An-26 transport plane, with technical failure being the likely cause, the Interfax news agency reported. All those on board were Russian military personnel, the ministry said.

“According to a report from the scene, the airplane was not fired upon,” the Russian Defense Ministry said in a statement, adding that an investigation into the crash had begun. The plane hit the ground more than 1,600 feet short of the runway at the Russian-operated Hmeimim Air Base, the statement said.

Russia has stepped up security at the air base and at a naval facility at Tartus on the Mediterranean coast after both came under a drone attack[1] in early January. The drones were shot down before they caused any damage and there were no casualties, according to a statement[2] on the military’s Facebook page.

The crash on Tuesday is the latest in a string of episodes involving markedly higher casualties among Russians in Syria after more than two years of relatively few. From the time Russia first intervened militarily in Syria in September 2015 until early this year, the public casualty figure was about 46 killed, although some analysts had suspected that it was higher.

In early February, anti-government forces shot down a Russian fighter jet[3] whose pilot blew himself up with a grenade rather than face capture. Then on Feb. 7, a clash erupted between pro-government forces backed by Russian mercenaries and an American-supported largely Kurdish militia near an eastern oil field. Amid confusing details, reports of Russian casualties[4] have ranged from five to dozens.

The Russian government sought to distance itself from that episode, first saying that no Russian army soldiers had been involved, then announcing that just five Russian citizens had been killed, then saying that dozens of Russian wounded had been evacuated home for treatment.

President Vladimir V. Putin appears increasingly mired in Syria despite saying several times that the Russian mission there has been accomplished.

The twin-engine turbo prop airplane Antonov An-26 that crashed Tuesday — produced in the Soviet Union from 1969 to 1986 — has a less than stellar safety record. More than 140 such airplanes have been involved in accidents over the past three decades, resulting in more than 1,300 casualties, according the Aviation Security Network, a database[5] that tracks aviation accidents.

In December 2016, another military transport plane carrying a famous military choir to Syria for Christmas celebrations plunged into the Black Sea[6] after taking off from the southern Russian resort of Sochi, killing all 92 people onboard.

Follow Neil MacFarquhar on Twitter: @NeilMacFarquhar

Ivan Nechepurenko contributed reporting.

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References

  1. ^ drone attack (www.nytimes.com)
  2. ^ statement (www.facebook.com)
  3. ^ shot down a Russian fighter jet (www.nytimes.com)
  4. ^ reports of Russian casualties (www.nytimes.com)
  5. ^ database (aviation-safety.net)
  6. ^ plunged into the Black Sea (www.nytimes.com)
0

Russian Military Transport Plane Crashes in Syria, Killing 39

Advertisement

MOSCOW — A Russian military transport plane carrying 33 passengers and six crew members crashed on landing at an air base in Syria on Tuesday, killing all on board, the Russian Defense Ministry said.

Initial reports ruled out a terrorist attack against the aircraft, an Antonov An-26 transport plane, with technical failure being the likely cause, the Interfax news agency reported. All those on board were Russian military personnel, the ministry said.

“According to a report from the scene, the airplane was not fired upon,” the Russian Defense Ministry said in a statement, adding that an investigation into the crash had begun. The plane hit the ground more than 1,600 feet short of the runway at the Russian-operated Hmeimim Air Base, the statement said.

Russia has stepped up security at the air base and at a naval facility at Tartus on the Mediterranean coast after both came under a drone attack[1] in early January. The drones were shot down before they caused any damage and there were no casualties, according to a statement[2] on the military’s Facebook page.

The crash on Tuesday is the latest in a string of episodes involving markedly higher casualties among Russians in Syria after more than two years of relatively few. From the time Russia first intervened militarily in Syria in September 2015 until early this year, the public casualty figure was about 46 killed, although some analysts had suspected that it was higher.

In early February, anti-government forces shot down a Russian fighter jet[3] whose pilot blew himself up with a grenade rather than face capture. Then on Feb. 7, a clash erupted between pro-government forces backed by Russian mercenaries and an American-supported largely Kurdish militia near an eastern oil field. Amid confusing details, reports of Russian casualties[4] have ranged from five to dozens.

The Russian government sought to distance itself from that episode, first saying that no Russian army soldiers had been involved, then announcing that just five Russian citizens had been killed, then saying that dozens of Russian wounded had been evacuated home for treatment.

President Vladimir V. Putin appears increasingly mired in Syria despite saying several times that the Russian mission there has been accomplished.

The twin-engine turbo prop airplane Antonov An-26 that crashed Tuesday — produced in the Soviet Union from 1969 to 1986 — has a less than stellar safety record. More than 140 such airplanes have been involved in accidents over the past three decades, resulting in more than 1,300 casualties, according the Aviation Security Network, a database[5] that tracks aviation accidents.

In December 2016, another military transport plane carrying a famous military choir to Syria for Christmas celebrations plunged into the Black Sea[6] after taking off from the southern Russian resort of Sochi, killing all 92 people onboard.

Follow Neil MacFarquhar on Twitter: @NeilMacFarquhar

Ivan Nechepurenko contributed reporting.

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References

  1. ^ drone attack (www.nytimes.com)
  2. ^ statement (www.facebook.com)
  3. ^ shot down a Russian fighter jet (www.nytimes.com)
  4. ^ reports of Russian casualties (www.nytimes.com)
  5. ^ database (aviation-safety.net)
  6. ^ plunged into the Black Sea (www.nytimes.com)
0

Russian Military Transport Plane Crashes in Syria, Killing 39

Advertisement

MOSCOW — A Russian military transport plane carrying 33 passengers and six crew members crashed on landing at an air base in Syria on Tuesday, killing all on board, the Russian Defense Ministry said.

Initial reports ruled out a terrorist attack against the aircraft, an Antonov An-26 transport plane, with technical failure being the likely cause, the Interfax news agency reported. All those on board were Russian military personnel, the ministry said.

“According to a report from the scene, the airplane was not fired upon,” the Russian Defense Ministry said in a statement, adding that an investigation into the crash had begun. The plane hit the ground more than 1,600 feet short of the runway at the Russian-operated Khmeimim Air Base, the statement said.

Russia has stepped up security at the air base and at a naval facility at Tartus on the Mediterranean coast after both came under a drone attack[1] in early January. The drones were shot down before they caused any damage and there were no casualties, according to a statement[2] on the military’s Facebook page.

The crash on Tuesday is the latest in a string of episodes involving markedly higher casualties among Russians in Syria after more than two years of relatively few. From the time Russia first intervened militarily in Syria in September 2015 until early this year, the public casualty figure was about 46 killed, although some analysts had suspected that it was higher.

In early February, anti-government forces shot down a Russian fighter jet[3] whose pilot blew himself up with a grenade rather than face capture. Then on Feb. 7, a clash erupted between pro-government forces backed by Russian mercenaries and an American-supported largely Kurdish militia near an eastern oil field. Amid confusing details, reports of Russian casualties[4] have ranged from five to dozens.

The Russian government sought to distance itself from that episode, first saying that no Russian army soldiers had been involved, then announcing that just five Russian citizens had been killed, then saying that dozens of Russian wounded had been evacuated home for treatment.

President Vladimir V. Putin appears increasingly mired in Syria despite saying several times that the Russian mission there has been accomplished.

The twin-engine turbo prop airplane Antonov An-26 that crashed Tuesday — produced in the Soviet Union from 1969 to 1986 — has a less than stellar safety record. More than 140 such airplanes have been involved in accidents over the past three decades, resulting in more than 1,300 casualties, according the Aviation Security Network, a database[5] that tracks aviation accidents.

In December 2016, another military transport plane carrying a famous military choir to Syria for Christmas celebrations plunged into the Black Sea[6] after taking off from the southern Russian resort of Sochi, killing all 92 people onboard.

Follow Neil MacFarquhar on Twitter: @NeilMacFarquhar

Ivan Nechepurenko contributed reporting.

Advertisement

References

  1. ^ drone attack (www.nytimes.com)
  2. ^ statement (www.facebook.com)
  3. ^ shot down a Russian fighter jet (www.nytimes.com)
  4. ^ reports of Russian casualties (www.nytimes.com)
  5. ^ database (aviation-safety.net)
  6. ^ plunged into the Black Sea (www.nytimes.com)