Tagged: feb

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Mattis faces deadline today on the military's transgender policy

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis faced a Wednesday deadline[1] to provide President Donald Trump guidance on transgender service members, as news reports surfaced revealing that the president initiated the ban last summer without consulting his top general.

“Things are at a very confusing moment right now,” said Shannon Minter, who is representing transgender personnel in two of the four federal lawsuits[2] challenging Trump’s ban.

“When President Trump issued his official memorandum[3] [in August of 2017] he ordered Mattis in that memo to provide the president with a written plan on how to implement the plan by Feb 21. So we’ve all been waiting, It’s obviously an important recommendation on exactly how the plan would be implemented.”

Mattis was directed to have the Pentagon study whether transgender personnel negatively impacted readiness and provide the White House guidance on whether Trump’s July ban should be reversed.

“The Secretary of Defense, after consulting with the Secretary of Homeland Security, may advise me at any time, in writing, that a change to this policy is warranted,” Trump said in the August 2017 memo.
[4]

As of midday Wednesday the Pentagon had not issued guidance, said Pentagon spokesman Army Maj. David Eastburn.

“The secretary has his recommendation for the President but has not provided it yet. When he’s ready to provide it, he will,” Eastburn said.

The guidance is not expected to be made public, several defense officials told Military Times.

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It was not clear if on that date the White House would also make Mattis’ February recommendations public. In addition, parts of Trump’s August directive have already been overturned in the courts, further muddying what exactly the transgender policy will be.

In the August memo, Trump also directed that no new transgender recruits be allowed to enlist in the military, upending earlier direction from Mattis that set a six-month delay that expired Jan. 1. Multiple federal courts have also ruled against that limitation, and transgender personnel were allowed to join the military as of Jan. 1, 2018.

In a statement issued in late December as the Jan. 1 ban expired, the Justice Department pointed to the anticipated guidance, supported by a study Mattis directed last August, as reason not to further pursue that angle of the ban.
[6]

The courts are still weighing in on the wider issue of whether any restrictions on transgender service are constitutional. In the two federal cases that Minter is involved with, administration attorneys have pointed to the anticipated policy from Mattis as a reason for delay. The cases are also in a heated discovery phase where attorneys for the transgender plaintiffs are trying to determine on what basis Trump made his July decision, and in consultation with whom.

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

On Wednesday BuzzFeed reported on emails it obtained that it said showed that Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Gen. Joseph Dunford was not consulted and caught off guard by the tweet, In subsequent memos to service members and in Congressional testimony Dunford has repeatedly said[7] “any individual who meets the physical and mental standards … should be afforded the opportunity to continue to serve.”

Dunford spokesman Air Force Col. Pat Ryder would not confirm whether the emails BuzzFeed obtained were authentic, stating that “because there is ongoing litigation regarding DoD policy on transgender accessions, it would be inappropriate for us to comment at this time on questions related to actual or alleged internal DoD correspondence.”

Meanwhile, the first new transgender recruits are getting closer to enlisting, Minter said. Nicolas Talbott,[8] 24, is one of the plaintiffs Minter is representing. Talbott has completed all of the medical paperwork necessary, including verification that he has had 18 months of stability after transitioning to a male.

“Next step is to schedule the MEPS,” Minter said.

References

  1. ^ Wednesday deadline (www.militarytimes.com)
  2. ^ in two of the four federal lawsuits (www.militarytimes.com)
  3. ^ official memorandum (www.militarytimes.com)
  4. ^ Trump said in the August 2017 memo. (www.whitehouse.gov)
  5. ^ This young man is transgender, and ready to enlist Jan. 1 (www.militarytimes.com)
  6. ^ Mattis directed last August, (www.militarytimes.com)
  7. ^ Dunford has repeatedly said (www.militarytimes.com)
  8. ^ Nicolas Talbott, (www.militarytimes.com)
0

Mattis faces deadline today on the military's transgender policy

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis faced a Wednesday deadline[1] to provide President Donald Trump guidance on transgender service members, as news reports surfaced revealing that the president initiated the ban last summer without consulting his top general.

“Things are at a very confusing moment right now,” said Shannon Minter, who is representing transgender personnel in two of the four federal lawsuits[2] challenging Trump’s ban.

“When President Trump issued his official memorandum[3] [in August of 2017] he ordered Mattis in that memo to provide the president with a written plan on how to implement the plan by Feb 21. So we’ve all been waiting, It’s obviously an important recommendation on exactly how the plan would be implemented.”

Mattis was directed to have the Pentagon study whether transgender personnel negatively impacted readiness and provide the White House guidance on whether Trump’s July ban should be reversed.

“The Secretary of Defense, after consulting with the Secretary of Homeland Security, may advise me at any time, in writing, that a change to this policy is warranted,” Trump said in the August 2017 memo.
[4]

As of midday Wednesday the Pentagon had not issued guidance, said Pentagon spokesman Army Maj. David Eastburn.

“The secretary has his recommendation for the President but has not provided it yet. When he’s ready to provide it, he will,” Eastburn said.

The guidance is not expected to be made public, several defense officials told Military Times.

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It was not clear if on that date the White House would also make Mattis’ February recommendations public. In addition, parts of Trump’s August directive have already been overturned in the courts, further muddying what exactly the transgender policy will be.

In the August memo, Trump also directed that no new transgender recruits be allowed to enlist in the military, upending earlier direction from Mattis that set a six-month delay that expired Jan. 1. Multiple federal courts have also ruled against that limitation, and transgender personnel were allowed to join the military as of Jan. 1, 2018.

In a statement issued in late December as the Jan. 1 ban expired, the Justice Department pointed to the anticipated guidance, supported by a study Mattis directed last August, as reason not to further pursue that angle of the ban.
[6]

The courts are still weighing in on the wider issue of whether any restrictions on transgender service are constitutional. In the two federal cases that Minter is involved with, administration attorneys have pointed to the anticipated policy from Mattis as a reason for delay. The cases are also in a heated discovery phase where attorneys for the transgender plaintiffs are trying to determine on what basis Trump made his July decision, and in consultation with whom.

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

On Wednesday BuzzFeed reported on emails it obtained that it said showed that Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Gen. Joseph Dunford was not consulted and caught off guard by the tweet, In subsequent memos to service members and in Congressional testimony Dunford has repeatedly said[7] “any individual who meets the physical and mental standards … should be afforded the opportunity to continue to serve.”

Dunford spokesman Air Force Col. Pat Ryder would not confirm whether the emails BuzzFeed obtained were authentic, stating that “because there is ongoing litigation regarding DoD policy on transgender accessions, it would be inappropriate for us to comment at this time on questions related to actual or alleged internal DoD correspondence.”

Meanwhile, the first new transgender recruits are getting closer to enlisting, Minter said. Nicolas Talbott,[8] 24, is one of the plaintiffs Minter is representing. Talbott has completed all of the medical paperwork necessary, including verification that he has had 18 months of stability after transitioning to a male.

“Next step is to schedule the MEPS,” Minter said.

References

  1. ^ Wednesday deadline (www.militarytimes.com)
  2. ^ in two of the four federal lawsuits (www.militarytimes.com)
  3. ^ official memorandum (www.militarytimes.com)
  4. ^ Trump said in the August 2017 memo. (www.whitehouse.gov)
  5. ^ This young man is transgender, and ready to enlist Jan. 1 (www.militarytimes.com)
  6. ^ Mattis directed last August, (www.militarytimes.com)
  7. ^ Dunford has repeatedly said (www.militarytimes.com)
  8. ^ Nicolas Talbott, (www.militarytimes.com)
0

Mattis faces deadline today on the military's transgender policy

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis faced a Wednesday deadline[1] to provide President Donald Trump guidance on transgender service members, as news reports surfaced revealing that the president initiated the ban last summer without consulting his top general.

“Things are at a very confusing moment right now,” said Shannon Minter, who is representing transgender personnel in two of the four federal lawsuits[2] challenging Trump’s ban.

“When President Trump issued his official memorandum[3] [in August of 2017] he ordered Mattis in that memo to provide the president with a written plan on how to implement the plan by Feb 21. So we’ve all been waiting, It’s obviously an important recommendation on exactly how the plan would be implemented.”

Mattis was directed to have the Pentagon study whether transgender personnel negatively impacted readiness and provide the White House guidance on whether Trump’s July ban should be reversed.

“The Secretary of Defense, after consulting with the Secretary of Homeland Security, may advise me at any time, in writing, that a change to this policy is warranted,” Trump said in the August 2017 memo.
[4]

As of midday Wednesday the Pentagon had not issued guidance, said Pentagon spokesman Army Maj. David Eastburn.

“The secretary has his recommendation for the President but has not provided it yet. When he’s ready to provide it, he will,” Eastburn said.

The guidance is not expected to be made public, several defense officials told Military Times.

Sign up for the Good News
All positive stories about the military
Thanks for signing up!

It was not clear if on that date the White House would also make Mattis’ February recommendations public. In addition, parts of Trump’s August directive have already been overturned in the courts, further muddying what exactly the transgender policy will be.

In the August memo, Trump also directed that no new transgender recruits be allowed to enlist in the military, upending earlier direction from Mattis that set a six-month delay that expired Jan. 1. Multiple federal courts have also ruled against that limitation, and transgender personnel were allowed to join the military as of Jan. 1, 2018.

In a statement issued in late December as the Jan. 1 ban expired, the Justice Department pointed to the anticipated guidance, supported by a study Mattis directed last August, as reason not to further pursue that angle of the ban.
[6]

The courts are still weighing in on the wider issue of whether any restrictions on transgender service are constitutional. In the two federal cases that Minter is involved with, administration attorneys have pointed to the anticipated policy from Mattis as a reason for delay. The cases are also in a heated discovery phase where attorneys for the transgender plaintiffs are trying to determine on what basis Trump made his July decision, and in consultation with whom.

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

In this July 29, 2017, photo, transgender U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Sims lifts her uniform during an interview with The Associated Press in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, Germany. (Matthias Schrader/AP)

On Wednesday BuzzFeed reported on emails it obtained that it said showed that Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Gen. Joseph Dunford was not consulted and caught off guard by the tweet, In subsequent memos to service members and in Congressional testimony Dunford has repeatedly said[7] “any individual who meets the physical and mental standards … should be afforded the opportunity to continue to serve.”

Dunford spokesman Air Force Col. Pat Ryder would not confirm whether the emails BuzzFeed obtained were authentic, stating that “because there is ongoing litigation regarding DoD policy on transgender accessions, it would be inappropriate for us to comment at this time on questions related to actual or alleged internal DoD correspondence.”

Meanwhile, the first new transgender recruits are getting closer to enlisting, Minter said. Nicolas Talbott,[8] 24, is one of the plaintiffs Minter is representing. Talbott has completed all of the medical paperwork necessary, including verification that he has had 18 months of stability after transitioning to a male.

“Next step is to schedule the MEPS,” Minter said.

References

  1. ^ Wednesday deadline (www.militarytimes.com)
  2. ^ in two of the four federal lawsuits (www.militarytimes.com)
  3. ^ official memorandum (www.militarytimes.com)
  4. ^ Trump said in the August 2017 memo. (www.whitehouse.gov)
  5. ^ This young man is transgender, and ready to enlist Jan. 1 (www.militarytimes.com)
  6. ^ Mattis directed last August, (www.militarytimes.com)
  7. ^ Dunford has repeatedly said (www.militarytimes.com)
  8. ^ Nicolas Talbott, (www.militarytimes.com)
0

$500000 found during traffic stop, Homeland Security investigating

YORK COUNTY – Nearly half a million dollars smeared with yellow mustard was discovered during a traffic stop in York County, leading to a Homeland Security investigation.

The York County Sheriff’s Office said a deputy pulled over an eastbound vehicle near Mile Marker 348 on Feb. 18.

The deputy felt something was suspicious during the stop, and asked the driver to search the car. Permission was granted, and a suitcase full of wrapped money smeared with yellow mustard was discovered. The total currency found is estimated at $490,000.

After seizing the money, a K9 indicated the cash had a strong odor of drugs.

The York County Sheriff’s Office said the case is now being investigated by Homeland Security, and the money was most likely headed to the Chicago area.

The suspect’s name is not being released.

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Giving troops a pay raise might be hurting the military

The 2019 budget proposal, if enacted, would give service members their biggest pay raise in eight years, a 2.4 percent increase in pay. But despite how good it sounds in the headlines, an across-the-board pay raise may not be what the military needs right now.

The military already saw a 2.1 percent pay increase request for 2018, and as military personnel costs are rising, some experts in military personnel are asking if across-the-board pay raises are the right approach to better the force.

Jim Perkins, former executive director of the Defense Entrepreneurs Forum and an Army reservist, says military pay is outpacing the inflation rate and civilians doing the same job, education and experience as troops are only paid 83 percent to 90 percent what service members are paid.

A 2013 Center for New American Security (CNAS) study[1] suggests the same thing.

“One of the largest contributors to the trend of rising military personnel costs is the growth in cash compensation. Military personnel cash compensation increased by 52 percent between 2002 and 2010, adjusted for inflation. Over the past 12 years, pay increases for military personnel have grown much faster than both inflation and private sector compensation,” the study stated.

Service members are at an even bigger financial advantage because of housing and food subsidies through basic allowance for housing (BAH) and commissaries.

The study stated the Defense Department could save $25 billion over 10 years if Congress issued more reasonable pay increases.

A Feb. 5 Congressional Budget Office report[2] stated personnel costs have increased 46 percent since 2000. A total of 42 percent of that growth is from BAH and basic pay.

The study stated that personnel costs were $142.3 billion in 2014.

Perkins thinks the across-the-board raises are harmful to the military’s search for talented individuals, while keeping less motivated individuals in the service.

“As much as I want to say paying the military more is great. It’s not necessarily,” Perkins said. “Throwing money at this problem is not going to solve it or not in the way that we want it to be solved.”

Perkins used a personal example to explain. An officer he knew was laid off from the Army after being passed over for promotion from captain to major. He left the military and couldn’t find equivalent compensation in the civilian sector based on his experience. He ended up joining the reserves and became an activated reservist for a year. He was promoted to major in the reserves.

“Now he is doing the same job as an active-duty captain, but getting paid more to do it as a major. A role for which he was previously deemed not qualified and the whole reason he was doing this was the fact that he couldn’t be paid as well if he wasn’t in the military,” Perkins said. “This epitomizes the fact that for the low performers in the military, if they stay in the military they may be staying because they’re afraid of losing this wonderful paycheck and benefits package.”

On the other hand, high-performing service members feel their effort is not being compensated; instead they are getting the same treatment as a low-performer for doing more work.

High performers “are seeing their hard work and talent is not being rewarded and differently than the lazy shirker who is sitting next to them,” Perkins said.

Those high performers can easily find jobs in the private sector that will pay them the equivalent compensation and benefits or much higher.

Perkins added that in the few exit surveys the military conducts, troops say pay is not the reason they are leaving, but rather the rigidity of military life.

Perkins suggested more flexibility in how Congress pays people in the military.

“We need to be able to compensate and reward people for taking on different roles that are more highly demanded or places that are bigger hardships. We need to have more flexibility in how we retain very specific skill sets,” Perkins said. “Raising pay across the board doesn’t necessarily do anything to solve the specific problems of a pilot shortage.”

The military is catching on to this as it watches some of the most needed employees like pilots, cyber experts and people trained in nuclear skills.

The military is offering modest bonuses to pilots and other occupations and creating some programs to make the work-life balance more flexible.

But, not many have caught on or are still in the pilot phase.

Meanwhile, the military is missing out on talented individuals it needs.

“Propensity to serve is declining, and each of the services, as well as the civilian sector, are vying for the same limited talent pool. We are clearly in a war for talent. Current forecasts based on leading economic indicators suggest difficult times ahead,” Vice Adm. Robert Burke, the deputy chief of Naval Operations of Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education, told the Senate Armed Services Committee on Feb. 14.

Military pay may be one of the issues hurting the effort.

Paying the military more across the board “is reflective of the divide and the guilt that exists between the civilians and the military. They don’t need to be paid more for what they’re doing and throwing money at this problem is not the way to solve it. Don’t say ‘Thank you for your service’ and then not realize we are sending troops to Niger. Don’t throw more money at the problem, get involved in the process,” Perkins said.

References

  1. ^ study (www.files.ethz.ch)
  2. ^ report (www.cbo.gov)
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116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
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116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team conducts signal gunnery, makes information more lethal

The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center. During the two-day field exercise portion, Soldiers practiced setting up and jumping their equipment five times, including two at night. (Photo Credit: Capt. Robert Taylor) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]

BOISE, Idaho – The 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team signal Soldiers conducted signal gunnery Feb. 6-11 on Gowen Field and in the Orchard Combat Training Center.

The training, planned and executed by the brigade’s communication section, was designed to train the brigade’s signal Soldiers in a training environment on their communication platforms prior to a year of heavy field training.

“Information is a weapon the brigade yields,” said CW3 Jerred Edgar, the brigade’s network defense chief. “We’re training Soldiers on their mission command weapons systems. We’re making information more lethal.”

Approximately 60 signal Soldiers from five signal military occupational specialties in each of the brigade’s seven battalions participated in the exercise. The training audience was sergeants and below working at the crew level.

Soldiers were intentionally assigned to crews with Soldiers from other units to allow signal Soldiers to get to know their counterparts across the battalion as well as share their experiences with Soldiers they don’t typically work with.

“Everyone does the same job,” said Sgt. Seth Gaskins, a signal support system specialist in C Company, 116th Brigade Engineer Battalion. “But everyone does it differently.”

Edgar began planning the training more than a year ago to accommodate the brigade’s training schedule. He developed the concept of “signal gunnery” after not being able to find any doctrine regarding crew-level training in the Army to mirror training line units are familiar with.

“We wanted to create a process that trains crews in a manner similar to tank gunnery to create shared understanding with commanders,” Edgar said. “There must be mutual understanding with commanders because they can think, ‘this is like tank gunnery for my signal Soldiers.'”

Edgar said the biggest challenges for signal Soldiers is being spread out across four states without ever being the focus of specific signal training. Signal Soldiers are expected to show up and perform their tasks without delay, he said.

The six-day training event gave Soldiers the chance to train on their assigned equipment and practice setting it up quickly. During the two-day field exercise, crews each jumped to five locations, including two at night.

“It’s good to be in a learning environment,” Gaskins said. “There’s not the pressure of failing our unit. We can just focus on improving the brigade, both as individuals and as a whole.”

The brigade plans to conduct similar training next year.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)