Tagged: events

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2nd ABCT, 3rd ID, wins Sullivan Cup tank competition at Fort Benning

The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
1 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
2 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
3 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
4 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.
5 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4, 2018 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo Patrick Albright) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]

FORT BENNING, Ga. — The Sullivan Cup, a biennial competition to determine the best tank crew in the Army through a series of scored tests, finished May 4 with 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart, Georgia, earning the top spot at Fort Benning, Georgia.

After several days of competition, the tank crews performed one final timed event May 4.

Staggered by their points placement on the morning of the last day, the tank crews ran a 1.7-mile route to Brave Rifles Field the morning of May 4. On the field, the crewmembers performed several tank-related physical and mental tasks. Crewmembers also completed five burpees between each station, and there was a five-burpee penalty for incorrect responses and failures on tasks.

After the completion of the final competitive event, tallies were made of the scores from throughout the competition. The top finishers in the Sullivan Cup were:

– 1st place: B Company, 3rd Battalion, 67th Armored Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, from Fort Stewart, Georgia
– 2nd place: C Company, 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division from Fort Riley, Kansas
– 3rd place: 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division from Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

Brig. Gen. David A. Lesperance, commandant of the U.S. Army Armor School at the Maneuver Center of Excellence, spoke at the competition’s closing ceremony.

“Never in my wildest imagination would I have guessed that it would have delivered what it did for army today,” said Lesperance. “They truly have identified the best tank crew and tank crews the Army has to offer today.”

The first day of competition included a stress shoot adapted specifically for tank crews and a ranked simulated combat maneuver exercise. On the second two days, the crews conducted a live-fire exercise and a situational training exercise. The scored events were meant to represent both what tank crews trained on and what they could expect in combat.

“What do we expect of a tank crew in our army today?” Lesperance asked rhetorically during the closing ceremony. “We expect that tank crew to be able to survive, maneuver to a point of positional advantage, to get our weapons into the fight and to deliver first-round lethality and have an effect on our target and have our target destroyed.”

Staff Sgt. Johnathan Werner, tank commander, Cpl. Justin Harris, gunner, Pvt. Brandon Zacher, loader, and Pvt. Dekken Sanders, driver, the winning tank crew from 2nd ABCT, 3rd ID, had only worked together for a few months before joining the competition.

“It’s pretty intense for the past roughly three months, but we gave it our all,” said Harris.

Werner described the competition as “fierce.”

“This is stuff that we do on a day-to-day basis — tanker grade gunnery, maneuvering — this is our job,” said Werner. “But when you put everyone in one area, the best of the best you possibly in the entire world, and then you compete and you have a bunch of alpha males, it kind of speaks for itself.”

Werner echoed Lesperance’s belief in the real-life use of the training they received during the competition.

“The way they facilitated the training, just by the book, the way they did the props for the gunnery, the way they did the STX training and the stress shoot, it was a little more realistic for combat engagement,” said Werner. “We should be able to take that back to the units and implement that on a lower level, not necessarily just for competitors. But if we can do this worldwide and have the worldwide training, the way the Army can, it’s what we really need to work toward.”

Both Zacher and Sanders, who have been in the Army for less than a year, found it strange to return to Fort Benning after finishing their basic training here. Sanders described the experience as “surreal.” Zacher appreciated seeing his trainers.

“It’s been pretty great seeing some of our old drill sergeants and shaking their hands,” said Zacher. “They’ve been rooting for us, so it feels great.”

To see photos from the 2018 Sullivan Cup, visit “Photo Album” in the “Related Links” section on this page.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
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1ST BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: 326th BEB provides diverse combat enablers

While most battalions have one primary role in its support of the brigade combat team, brigade engineer battalions provide multiple critical functions to enable combat operations.

Soldiers from 326th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, showcased their unit’s versatility during a weeklong field training exercise, March 12-Friday, at Fort Campbell’s training area.

The FTX prepared the battalion to better integrate into brigade-level combined arms training events. The FTX also certified certain elements on their mission essential tasks.

“The 326th BEB is the most unique battalion within the Bastogne brigade,” said Lt. Col. Jonathan Zimmer, 326th BEB commander, who often compares his battalion to a multipurpose tool. “Each tool performs a different function, and this is how our battalion supports the brigade.”

Those tools include six companies from which there are two engineer companies, a signal company, a military intelligence company, a forward support company and a headquarters and headquarters company.

Soldiers from A and B engineer companies conducted engineer qualification tables, Sapper missions focused on reconnaissance, mobility and counter mobility, and survivability operations.  “We have an area reconnaissance lane, and a complex obstacle breach lane, a route reconnaissance lane, and a complex obstacle emplacement lane where they are actually emplacing a deliberate crater and an 11-row wire obstacle,” said Capt. Benjamin Speckhart, A Co., 326th BEB commander.

The Soldiers of C Company, the signal company, performed retransmission and networking training, and sling load operations to hone their military occupational skill-specific and air assault skills.

The Soldiers of D Company, the military intelligence company, consists of three platoons – the unmanned aircraft system platoon that operates the RQ-7 Shadow UAS, a multi-function platoon that has signal and human intelligence capabilities, and an information collection platoon that, with the brigade intelligence section, analyzes information from all reconnaissance assets for Bastogne. The Soldiers conducted aerial reconnaissance missions in support of 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, 1st BCT, and 326th BEB’s platoon defensive live-fire exercises,

The forward support Soldiers of E Company increased their lethality during the platoon defensive live fire as well as conducted sling load operations to certify day and night aerial resupply missions. Additionally, the maintenance platoon conducted recovery operations, the field feeding section cooked and served meals for more than 500 Soldiers during the week, and the distribution platoon supported the entire battalion with fuel and ammo.

During the defensive live-fire exercise, the chemical reconnaissance platoon of Headquarters and Headquarters Company conducted decontamination training to increase the knowledge and skills for Soldiers throughout the battalion.

“We’re training on how to properly decontaminate equipment and vehicles so that in the case we are attacked, we can set up a decon line and get them back to the battle,” said Spc. Thomas Rivera, a CBRN specialist. This training is important because there are countries who are experimenting with chemicals, and there’s a history of chemicals being used, so I feel it is our responsibility to actually make sure everybody is prepared for such an attack.”  

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US-South Korea military exercises are on, despite Trump's planned meeting with Kim. Here's what will happen.


Navy explosive ordnance disposal technicians prepare to dive near the coast of Jinhae, South Korea, in March 2017 as part of the exercise called Foal Eagle. (Alfred A. Coffield/Navy)

As the White House prepares for what could be the first meeting between a sitting U.S. president and a North Korean leader, the U.S. and South Korean militaries will carry out exercises that Pyongyang has long called provocative but now appears to accept.

South Korean national security adviser Chung Eui-yong announced Thursday at the White House[1] that in addition to President Trump agreeing to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un by May, Kim pledged that North Korea will refrain from additional nuclear or missile tests and “understands that the routine joint military exercises between the Republic of Korea and the United States must continue.”

The latter acknowledgment marked a significant shift for the Kim regime. Each spring, the United States and South Korea launch military exercises known as Foal Eagle and Key Resolve, and the Kim regime has typically reacted angrily. The exercises there are seen as preparation for an attack on Pyongyang, while the South Koreans and Americans characterize them as defensive in nature.

[Trump accepts invitation to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un[2]]

Last year, North Korea fired four ballistic missiles toward Japan in what was widely seen as a response to the exercises. The North Korean military already had warned that if a single shell fell in waters near the Korean Peninsula, it would immediately launch “merciless” counteractions.

A new round of North Korean ballistic missile launches on Mar. 6 has triggered anger from Japan. (Reuters)

The exercises are believed to include rehearsals of what is known as OPLAN 5015, in which U.S. and South Korean forces would carry out “decapitation” strikes aimed at killing Kim and other senior members of his regime. North Korean hackers stole a trove of classified data in 2016, including information about the strikes, a South Korean lawmaker announced last year[3].

Foal Eagle began last year on March 3, with about 3,600 U.S. troops deploying to South Korea to join others among the 28,500 U.S. forces based there to participate in the exercises, according to U.S. Pacific Command[4]. The exercises included the new F-35B Joint Strike Fighter among a fleet of aircraft, the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson and other Navy ships, and ground forces.

The exercise this year is expected to begin at the end of the month — a delay that South Korea requested to work around the now-concluded Winter Olympics and the Winter Paralympics, which began Friday. The operation includes live exercises and war games involving computer simulations.

[Trump agrees to delay military exercise with South Korea until after Winter Olympics[5]]

The exercises are bookended by another set of computer-simulated exercises late each summer known as  Ulchi Freedom Guardian. Those exercises focus on defending South Korea from attack.

South Korea’s national security adviser announced at The White House that President Trump has agreed to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un “by May.” Here are three other big events in North Korean diplomacy. (Jason Aldag/The Washington Post)
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Hood receives Army team award

Fort Hood’s Qualified Recycle Program stood out as the U.S. Army leader in recycling and was recently recognized as the winner of the Secretary of the Army Award for Environmental Quality for a team and will go on to represent the Army and compete in the Secretary of Defense Environmental Awards program this spring.

“As a true leader in solid waste management and recycling, we have the best QRP in the Army, here at Fort Hood,” Col. Hank Perry, Fort Hood garrison commander, said. “I take tremendous pride in our team’s efforts to inspire the community and the support of Soldiers, civilians and their Family members to do their part to recycle.”

In 2017, Fort Hood’s impressive program sold 16.516 million pounds of recyclable material, including cardboard, paper, plastic, metal, glass, toner cartridges, Styrofoam, civilian clothing and other miscellaneous recyclables.

Michael Bush, business operations manager for Fort Hood Recycle, attributed this success to his team and the Fort Hood community.

“Our employees work hard every day to make sure the operation runs smoothly,” Bush said. “We appreciate the support of our Soldiers and their Families to do the right thing and recycle as much as possible.”

Many accomplishments in 2017 include collecting 2.051 million pounds of recyclables in Family housing; greening the movie production set of “The Long Road Home” and collecting 15,100 pounds of scrap metal; and co-hosting a surge event for units to clear out CONEX containers of serviceable and unserviceable items that collected 557,000 pounds of scrap metal.

“A QRP can save a lot of time, effort and money for the Army when disposing of eligible unserviceable products,” Bush said. “If you want to get better at your disposal logistics, then you should engage your QRP and make sure they are part of your efforts. The impact on your installation can be very positive and very significant to your bottom line.”

The Fort Hood Recycle team leverages opportunities to inform and educate Soldiers, civilians and their Families to work together for a greener future, while giving back to the community.

The team provided $89,000 of recycle revenue to help sponsor 32 Soldier and Family events hosted by the Directorate of Family Morale, Welfare and Recreation.

“The recycle program has been a significant contributor of funding Soldier and Family programs such as our Independence Day massive firework display, as well as numerous other morale-building events for Soldiers, Families, retirees, survivors and Department of the Army civilians that would not have taken place without this critical support,” Nicholas Johnsen, director of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation, said.

With recycle containers at more than 500 locations across the installation and an upgraded single-stream facility, Fort Hood makes it easy for the community to be good stewards of the environment. The recycle team also developed an app called Fort Hood Recycle that is compatible with iOS and Android devices and allows users to search an item and learn how to best dispose of or recycle an item.

The team’s efforts engaged and empower stakeholders, aligned with Fort Hood’s mission to support Net Zero Waste, reduced the amount of material sent to the landfill.

“Our team is able to take valuable resources that would otherwise have ended up in the landfill, collect, process and sell them, generating funds that pay their overhead and generate a profit that goes back into our community,” Brian Dosa, director of Public Works, said. “They are helping us achieve Net Zero Waste goal while making a profit – amazing.”

“Fort Hood’s ability to accomplish Net Zero is a mission driven effort, and requires the same disciplined planning, and execution that all missions require,” Johnsen said.

With the community support from Soldiers, civilians and their Families, the Fort Hood Recycle team will continue to enhance the environment, promote litter prevention, and increase sales of recyclable material.

“We hope that other Central Texas communities and other Army installations see that recycling is a viable alternative to burying precious resources in landfills,” Dosa said. “Recycling can be profitable and generate valuable funds that communities can use to support other programs.”

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Alaska Troops Hold Annual Winter Games

FORT WAINWRIGHT, Alaska, March 6, 2018 —

As temperatures plummeted into the negative ’20s here, 17 teams of 10 soldiers each from across U.S. Army Alaska and the Canadian Army competed in a series of cold weather and mountainous warrior tasks Feb. 27-March 2. [1]

Team 15 from 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, prevailed, scoring the highest point total.[2]

The annual U.S. Army Alaska Winter Games were held this year at the Birch Hill Ski and Snowboard Area here. Events included a biathlon, a written test, ahkio — runnerless sledge towing — shooting on snowshoes, casualty evacuation and treatment, tent setup, downhill skiing, skijoring — which is skiing while pulled, in this case by a vehicle, but a horse or dog team can also be used — and land navigation.[3]

“It’s important because it helps individuals training on these specific events, that they can then take back to their units,” said Army 1st Lt. Michael McKeon, the winning team’s leader and a platoon leader with 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Like for us, we’re the ski platoon for our troop, and we didn’t get really good at it until we trained for this competition,” he said. “Now, we’re excellent at skiing and can take that back to our unit.”

Building Arctic Skills

The games, as with any other military competition, serves a variety of purposes.

“This process started three-and-a-half to four months ago,” said Army 1st Lt. Christopher Rainsberger, the Arctic Warrior Games officer in charge and a platoon leader with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Events like this are extremely important for [U.S. Army Alaska] because one of the main things that the units up here focus on is Arctic mobility and Arctic skills,” Rainsberger said. “These events are an excellent way to train for that and to show how well your squad or your team is proficient at skiing, setting up 10-man tents and shooting in Arctic conditions under stress.”

“All the effort and the heart the teams put into practicing really shows the teams are competing,” he added. “The teams practice weeks and months before the event, and there’s a lot of camaraderie with those teams.”

References

  1. ^ U.S. Army Alaska (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ 25th Infantry Division (www.25idl.army.mil)
  3. ^ here (www.wainwright.army.mil)
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Alaska Troops Hold Annual Winter Games

FORT WAINWRIGHT, Alaska, March 6, 2018 —

As temperatures plummeted into the negative ’20s here, 17 teams of 10 soldiers each from across U.S. Army Alaska and the Canadian Army competed in a series of cold weather and mountainous warrior tasks Feb. 27-March 2. [1]

Team 15 from 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, prevailed, scoring the highest point total.[2]

The annual U.S. Army Alaska Winter Games were held this year at the Birch Hill Ski and Snowboard Area here. Events included a biathlon, a written test, ahkio — runnerless sledge towing — shooting on snowshoes, casualty evacuation and treatment, tent setup, downhill skiing, skijoring — which is skiing while pulled, in this case by a vehicle, but a horse or dog team can also be used — and land navigation.[3]

“It’s important because it helps individuals training on these specific events, that they can then take back to their units,” said Army 1st Lt. Michael McKeon, the winning team’s leader and a platoon leader with 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Like for us, we’re the ski platoon for our troop, and we didn’t get really good at it until we trained for this competition,” he said. “Now, we’re excellent at skiing and can take that back to our unit.”

Building Arctic Skills

The games, as with any other military competition, serves a variety of purposes.

“This process started three-and-a-half to four months ago,” said Army 1st Lt. Christopher Rainsberger, the Arctic Warrior Games officer in charge and a platoon leader with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment.

“Events like this are extremely important for [U.S. Army Alaska] because one of the main things that the units up here focus on is Arctic mobility and Arctic skills,” Rainsberger said. “These events are an excellent way to train for that and to show how well your squad or your team is proficient at skiing, setting up 10-man tents and shooting in Arctic conditions under stress.”

“All the effort and the heart the teams put into practicing really shows the teams are competing,” he added. “The teams practice weeks and months before the event, and there’s a lot of camaraderie with those teams.”

References

  1. ^ U.S. Army Alaska (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ 25th Infantry Division (www.25idl.army.mil)
  3. ^ here (www.wainwright.army.mil)