Tagged: enter

0

Homeland Security Promises to Prosecute 100 Percent of Illegal Immigration Cases

In a major policy shift, the Homeland Security and Justice departments are promising to prosecute everyone suspected of illegally entering the United States. The new approach will separate thousands of children from their parents when they are arrested, which critics called inhumane.

“We need legality and integrity in our immigration system. That’s why the Department of Homeland Security is now referring 100 percent of illegal Southwest border crossings to the Department of Justice for prosecution,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said at a news conference in San Diego on Monday.

“If you cross this border unlawfully, then we will prosecute you. It’s that simple. If you smuggle illegal aliens across our border, then we will prosecute you. If you are smuggling a child, then we will prosecute you and that child may be separated from you as required by law,” Sessions said as a protester with a bullhorn interrupted his remarks.

Politico reported Monday[1] that Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen signed a memo on Friday directing the department to refer all suspected border crossers to the Justice Department for prosecution under a federal statute that prohibits illegal entry. Illegally entering the country has typically been treated as a civil matter in which the immigrant is subject to deportation. The new policy means all cases will be treated as a criminal matter in which immigrants face prison.

Border Patrol agents were told of the new policy over the weekend, said a federal law enforcement official who asked not to be identified because he or she wasn’t authorized to speak publicly.

“At muster they just said, ‘We are now prosecuting everyone, 100 percent.’ Then there were a few cheers and someone shouted, ‘Thank you, Trump.’ They followed up with family unit situations and said that if a unit was apprehended that the parent with the most criminal history would be prosecuted,” the official said.

One of the biggest changes in the 100 percent prosecution policy will be the separation of families accused of illegally crossing the border together. Children, who cannot be held in criminal detention, will be placed in the custody of the Department of Health and Human Services while their parents are in custody. Previously, families caught entering the country illegally were most often quickly released together to await civil deportation hearings.

The 100 percent prosecution policy “is yet another solution in search of a problem,” said Jeremy McKinney, national secretary of the American Immigration Lawyers Association[2]. ”Illegal entries are at forty-year lows and net migration with Mexico remains at or below zero. There exists an annual, spring/summer uptick in unlawful entries. But the numbers are not unusual and the (federal immigration enforcement) infrastructure is there to enforce our country’s immigration laws. Devoting our finite resources to achieve misdemeanor convictions, especially when it results in the separation of mothers from their children, is, at best, bad public policy, and, at worst, unlawful selective prosecution.”

The Department of Homeland Security said it used a tough prosecution approach against parents in the Border Patrol’s El Paso sector between July and November 2017, after the West Texas and New Mexico border region saw a surge in families and unaccompanied children. Homeland Security said illegal crossings by family units dropped by 64 percent after the aggressive prosecution began, then began to rise again after the program was “paused.”

Andre Segura, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Texas, said that is a simplistic analysis. “Crossings can vary depending on a number of factors, what’s going on in home countries—there are a lot of different factors,” he said.

The Washington Post, which first reported[3] the plans to arrest parents who bring their children into the country illegally, said jailing parents would deter others from attempting to unlawfully enter the United States.

Sessions reinforced that message at his San Diego news conference. “I have to say our goal is to have the whole world know that this border is not open. Don’t come unlawfully. Don’t put yourself or your family through such a stressful thing,” Sessions said.

The ACLU’s Segura said immigration policy requires multiple approaches. “Immigration policies should not be set based on deterrence alone. If this is, in fact, deterring people from fleeing violence and coming here for refuge, that is an enormous problem.”

Thomas Homan, the outgoing head of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, also spoke at the San Diego news conference and said police separate families all the time when making arrests.

“Every law enforcement agency in this country separates parents with children when they’re arrested for a crime. We are a law enforcement agency. We are enforcing the criminal laws,” Homan said. “So I want to make this perfectly clear. There is no new policy. This has always been the policy. Now, you will see more prosecutions because of the attorney general’s commitment to zero tolerance.”

Entering the United States without permission and proper documents has long been a misdemeanor, but previous policies allowed many of those apprehended to go through the administrative deportation process rather than face criminal charges.

The new policy applies to people who enter the country without permission, such as coming in at an area other than a port of entry. It would not apply to people who surrender at ports of entry to seek asylum.

Criminal prosecutions for violating immigration laws spiked during President Obama’s first term, reaching nearly 100,000 in fiscal year 2013, according to the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University[4]. Such prosecutions declined in Obama’s second term and in President Trump’s first year in office, with fewer than 60,000 prosecutions in fiscal year 2016.

Sessions last week announced that the Justice Department was assigning 35 additional U.S. attorneys to the Southwest to handle additional immigration cases. That includes eight new prosecutors for the Southern District of Texas, which has the highest number of immigrant apprehensions along the border, and six in the Western District of Texas.

During his news conference, Sessions once again pointed to an increase in undocumented immigrant apprehensions in recent months. He said the number of apprehensions on the Southwest border tripled in April compared to the same month a year ago. However, Customs and Border Protection statistics show that the number of apprehensions over the past twelve months is 23 percent below the prior twelve-month period. Apprehension levels are less than half the levels of a decade ago.

0

Homeland Security Promises to Prosecute 100 Percent of Illegal Immigration Cases

In a major policy shift, the Homeland Security and Justice departments are promising to prosecute everyone suspected of illegally entering the United States. The new approach will separate thousands of children from their parents when they are arrested, which critics called inhumane.

“We need legality and integrity in our immigration system. That’s why the Department of Homeland Security is now referring 100 percent of illegal Southwest border crossings to the Department of Justice for prosecution,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said at a news conference in San Diego on Monday.

“If you cross this border unlawfully, then we will prosecute you. It’s that simple. If you smuggle illegal aliens across our border, then we will prosecute you. If you are smuggling a child, then we will prosecute you and that child may be separated from you as required by law,” Sessions said as a protester with a bullhorn interrupted his remarks.

Politico reported Monday[1] that Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen signed a memo on Friday directing the department to refer all suspected border crossers to the Justice Department for prosecution under a federal statute that prohibits illegal entry. Illegally entering the country has typically been treated as a civil matter in which the immigrant is subject to deportation. The new policy means all cases will be treated as a criminal matter in which immigrants face prison.

Border Patrol agents were told of the new policy over the weekend, said a federal law enforcement official who asked not to be identified because he or she wasn’t authorized to speak publicly.

“At muster they just said, ‘We are now prosecuting everyone, 100 percent.’ Then there were a few cheers and someone shouted, ‘Thank you, Trump.’ They followed up with family unit situations and said that if a unit was apprehended that the parent with the most criminal history would be prosecuted,” the official said.

One of the biggest changes in the 100 percent prosecution policy will be the separation of families accused of illegally crossing the border together. Children, who cannot be held in criminal detention, will be placed in the custody of the Department of Health and Human Services while their parents are in custody. Previously, families caught entering the country illegally were most often quickly released together to await civil deportation hearings.

The 100 percent prosecution policy “is yet another solution in search of a problem,” said Jeremy McKinney, national secretary of the American Immigration Lawyers Association[2]. ”Illegal entries are at forty-year lows and net migration with Mexico remains at or below zero. There exists an annual, spring/summer uptick in unlawful entries. But the numbers are not unusual and the (federal immigration enforcement) infrastructure is there to enforce our country’s immigration laws. Devoting our finite resources to achieve misdemeanor convictions, especially when it results in the separation of mothers from their children, is, at best, bad public policy, and, at worst, unlawful selective prosecution.”

The Department of Homeland Security said it used a tough prosecution approach against parents in the Border Patrol’s El Paso sector between July and November 2017, after the West Texas and New Mexico border region saw a surge in families and unaccompanied children. Homeland Security said illegal crossings by family units dropped by 64 percent after the aggressive prosecution began, then began to rise again after the program was “paused.”

Andre Segura, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Texas, said that is a simplistic analysis. “Crossings can vary depending on a number of factors, what’s going on in home countries—there are a lot of different factors,” he said.

The Washington Post, which first reported[3] the plans to arrest parents who bring their children into the country illegally, said jailing parents would deter others from attempting to unlawfully enter the United States.

Sessions reinforced that message at his San Diego news conference. “I have to say our goal is to have the whole world know that this border is not open. Don’t come unlawfully. Don’t put yourself or your family through such a stressful thing,” Sessions said.

The ACLU’s Segura said immigration policy requires multiple approaches. “Immigration policies should not be set based on deterrence alone. If this is, in fact, deterring people from fleeing violence and coming here for refuge, that is an enormous problem.”

Thomas Homan, the outgoing head of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, also spoke at the San Diego news conference and said police separate families all the time when making arrests.

“Every law enforcement agency in this country separates parents with children when they’re arrested for a crime. We are a law enforcement agency. We are enforcing the criminal laws,” Homan said. “So I want to make this perfectly clear. There is no new policy. This has always been the policy. Now, you will see more prosecutions because of the attorney general’s commitment to zero tolerance.”

Entering the United States without permission and proper documents has long been a misdemeanor, but previous policies allowed many of those apprehended to go through the administrative deportation process rather than face criminal charges.

The new policy applies to people who enter the country without permission, such as coming in at an area other than a port of entry. It would not apply to people who surrender at ports of entry to seek asylum.

Criminal prosecutions for violating immigration laws spiked during President Obama’s first term, reaching nearly 100,000 in fiscal year 2013, according to the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University[4]. Such prosecutions declined in Obama’s second term and in President Trump’s first year in office, with fewer than 60,000 prosecutions in fiscal year 2016.

Sessions last week announced that the Justice Department was assigning 35 additional U.S. attorneys to the Southwest to handle additional immigration cases. That includes eight new prosecutors for the Southern District of Texas, which has the highest number of immigrant apprehensions along the border, and six in the Western District of Texas.

During his news conference, Sessions once again pointed to an increase in undocumented immigrant apprehensions in recent months. He said the number of apprehensions on the Southwest border tripled in April compared to the same month a year ago. However, Customs and Border Protection statistics show that the number of apprehensions over the past twelve months is 23 percent below the prior twelve-month period. Apprehension levels are less than half the levels of a decade ago.

0

Homeland Security Promises to Prosecute 100 Percent of Illegal Immigration Cases

In a major policy shift, the Homeland Security and Justice departments are promising to prosecute everyone suspected of illegally entering the United States. The new approach will separate thousands of children from their parents when they are arrested, which critics called inhumane.

“We need legality and integrity in our immigration system. That’s why the Department of Homeland Security is now referring 100 percent of illegal Southwest border crossings to the Department of Justice for prosecution,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said at a news conference in San Diego on Monday.

“If you cross this border unlawfully, then we will prosecute you. It’s that simple. If you smuggle illegal aliens across our border, then we will prosecute you. If you are smuggling a child, then we will prosecute you and that child may be separated from you as required by law,” Sessions said as a protester with a bullhorn interrupted his remarks.

Politico reported Monday[1] that Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen signed a memo on Friday directing the department to refer all suspected border crossers to the Justice Department for prosecution under a federal statute that prohibits illegal entry. Illegally entering the country has typically been treated as a civil matter in which the immigrant is subject to deportation. The new policy means all cases will be treated as a criminal matter in which immigrants face prison.

Border Patrol agents were told of the new policy over the weekend, said a federal law enforcement official who asked not to be identified because he or she wasn’t authorized to speak publicly.

“At muster they just said, ‘We are now prosecuting everyone, 100 percent.’ Then there were a few cheers and someone shouted, ‘Thank you, Trump.’ They followed up with family unit situations and said that if a unit was apprehended that the parent with the most criminal history would be prosecuted,” the official said.

One of the biggest changes in the 100 percent prosecution policy will be the separation of families accused of illegally crossing the border together. Children, who cannot be held in criminal detention, will be placed in the custody of the Department of Health and Human Services while their parents are in custody. Previously, families caught entering the country illegally were most often quickly released together to await civil deportation hearings.

The 100 percent prosecution policy “is yet another solution in search of a problem,” said Jeremy McKinney, national secretary of the American Immigration Lawyers Association[2]. ”Illegal entries are at forty-year lows and net migration with Mexico remains at or below zero. There exists an annual, spring/summer uptick in unlawful entries. But the numbers are not unusual and the (federal immigration enforcement) infrastructure is there to enforce our country’s immigration laws. Devoting our finite resources to achieve misdemeanor convictions, especially when it results in the separation of mothers from their children, is, at best, bad public policy, and, at worst, unlawful selective prosecution.”

The Department of Homeland Security said it used a tough prosecution approach against parents in the Border Patrol’s El Paso sector between July and November 2017, after the West Texas and New Mexico border region saw a surge in families and unaccompanied children. Homeland Security said illegal crossings by family units dropped by 64 percent after the aggressive prosecution began, then began to rise again after the program was “paused.”

Andre Segura, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Texas, said that is a simplistic analysis. “Crossings can vary depending on a number of factors, what’s going on in home countries—there are a lot of different factors,” he said.

The Washington Post, which first reported[3] the plans to arrest parents who bring their children into the country illegally, said jailing parents would deter others from attempting to unlawfully enter the United States.

Sessions reinforced that message at his San Diego news conference. “I have to say our goal is to have the whole world know that this border is not open. Don’t come unlawfully. Don’t put yourself or your family through such a stressful thing,” Sessions said.

The ACLU’s Segura said immigration policy requires multiple approaches. “Immigration policies should not be set based on deterrence alone. If this is, in fact, deterring people from fleeing violence and coming here for refuge, that is an enormous problem.”

Thomas Homan, the outgoing head of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, also spoke at the San Diego news conference and said police separate families all the time when making arrests.

“Every law enforcement agency in this country separates parents with children when they’re arrested for a crime. We are a law enforcement agency. We are enforcing the criminal laws,” Homan said. “So I want to make this perfectly clear. There is no new policy. This has always been the policy. Now, you will see more prosecutions because of the attorney general’s commitment to zero tolerance.”

Entering the United States without permission and proper documents has long been a misdemeanor, but previous policies allowed many of those apprehended to go through the administrative deportation process rather than face criminal charges.

The new policy applies to people who enter the country without permission, such as coming in at an area other than a port of entry. It would not apply to people who surrender at ports of entry to seek asylum.

Criminal prosecutions for violating immigration laws spiked during President Obama’s first term, reaching nearly 100,000 in fiscal year 2013, according to the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University[4]. Such prosecutions declined in Obama’s second term and in President Trump’s first year in office, with fewer than 60,000 prosecutions in fiscal year 2016.

Sessions last week announced that the Justice Department was assigning 35 additional U.S. attorneys to the Southwest to handle additional immigration cases. That includes eight new prosecutors for the Southern District of Texas, which has the highest number of immigrant apprehensions along the border, and six in the Western District of Texas.

During his news conference, Sessions once again pointed to an increase in undocumented immigrant apprehensions in recent months. He said the number of apprehensions on the Southwest border tripled in April compared to the same month a year ago. However, Customs and Border Protection statistics show that the number of apprehensions over the past twelve months is 23 percent below the prior twelve-month period. Apprehension levels are less than half the levels of a decade ago.

0

2018 'ASTORS' Homeland Security Awards Open for Early Entries

Michael Madsen, AST Publisher, Cliff Quiroga, Vice President for Sharp Robotics Business Development and the team’s Director of Marketing, Alice DiSanto
Michael Madsen, AST Publisher, with 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Sponsor Cliff Quiroga, Vice President for Sharp Robotics Business Development, and the team’s Director of Marketing, Alice DiSanto

2018 ASTORSAmerican Security Today is pleased to announce that Early Entry Nominations are being accepted for the 2018 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program – the most Comprehensive Awards Program in the Industry, through April 25th, 2018.

Acknowledge the Most Distinguished Vendors of Physical, IT, Cyber, Port of Entry Security, Law Enforcement, First Responders, Perimeter Protection, Communications as well as Federal, State, County and Municipal Government Agencies in Acknowledgment of Their Outstanding Efforts to: ‘Keep our Nation Safe – One City at a Time’

AST-Image-of-Eagle-and-Flag-resized-2

Access Control/ Identification Personal/Protective Equipment Law Enforcement Counter Terrorism
Perimeter Barrier/ Deterrent System Interagency Interdiction Operation Cloud Computing/Storage Solution
Facial/IRIS Recognition Body Worn Video Product Cyber Security
Video Surveillance/VMS Mobile Technology Anti-Malware
Audio Analytics Disaster Preparedness ID Management
Thermal/Infrared Camera Mass Notification System Fire & Safety
Metal/Weapon Detection Rescue Operations Critical Infrastructure
License Plate Recognition Detection Products And Many Others!

Don’t see a Direct Hit for your Product, Agency or Organization?

Submit your category recommendation for consideration to Michael Madsen, AST Publisher at: [email protected][1].

AST

Please View our Complete List of Categories & Opportunities[2] for Your Organization to Compete and Distinguish Your Achievements in this Exclusive Opportunity to receive the Recognition Your Public Safety, Law Enforcement & Homeland Security Deserves.

AST banner

AST focuses on New and Evolving Security Threats at All Levels of Homeland Security and Public Safety for personnel who are on the front lines of protecting our communities, cities and nation.

• Compelling, attractive and easy to read digital publications delivered daily to a select readership of over 70,000 decision makers in the American security and homeland security fields
• Compelling, attractive and easy to read digital publications delivered daily, weekly and monthly to a select readership of over 70,000 decision makers in the American security and homeland security fields

AST reaches both the private and public experts, essential to meeting today’s growing security challenges, including:

  • Federal, State & Local Government Agencies & Law Enforcement Organizations, Private Security Agencies… Security Directors… Port Directors… Airport Directors… IT/Cyber Security Directors & More
  • Transportation Hubs, Public Assemblies, Government Facilities, Sports Arenas, our Nation’s Schools, Higher Education Campuses and Commercial Business Destinations – are all enticing targets for extremist attacks due to the large numbers of persons and resources clustered together
  • The new integration, where major applications such as Perimeter Protection, Video Surveillance, Access Control and Alarm Systems communicate with one another in a variety of solutions to protect our Cities and Critical Infrastructure
  • Expanded readership into vital Critical Infrastructure audiences such as protection of Nuclear Facilities, Water Plants & Dams, Bridges & Tunnels and other potential targets of terrorism

local-800

The AST Digital Publications is distributed to over 70,000 qualified government and homeland security professionals in federal, state and local levels.

AST puts forward the Largest and Most Qualified Circulation in Government with Over 70,000 readers on the Federal, State and Local levels.

‘PROTECTING OUR NATION, ONE CITY AT A TIME’

Harness the Power of the Web – with our 100% Mobile Friendly Publications

American Security Today’s 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Awards Presentation Luncheon at ISC East was an overwhelming success, with distinguished guests from National, State and Local Governments, and Industry Leading Corporate Executives from companies allied to Government.

Over 100 professionals gathered from across North America and the Middle East to be honored from disciplines across the Security Industry in their respective fields which included:

  • The Department of Homeland Security
  • The Department of Justice
  • The Security Exchange Commission
  • State and Municipal Law Enforcement Agencies, and
  • Leaders in Private Security

Recognized for their Innovative Training and Education Programs, Outstanding Product Development Achievements and Exciting New Technologies to address the growing Homeland Security Threats our Nation is facing.

The 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Presentation Luncheon
The 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Presentation Luncheon

AST’s publisher Michael Madsen, has announced an AST ‘ASTORS’ Awards Preview Edition to be published in an upcoming AST Magazine – a Full Feature Issue devoted to the competing firms and their achievements with an introduction to our 70,000+ readers – so Enter Today!

american-security-expo-luncheon

The highlight of the 2018 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program will be the Awards Presentation Luncheon at ISC East at the Javits Convention Center on Wednesday, November 14th.[3]

AST focuses on New and Evolving Security Threats at All Levels of Homeland Security and Public Safety for personnel who are on the front lines of protecting our communities, cities and nation.

AST reaches both the private and public experts, essential to meeting today’s growing security challenges.

For Sponsorship Opportunities and More Information on the AST 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program, please contact Michael Madsen, AST Publisher at: [email protected][4] or call 732.233.8119 (mobile) or 646-450-6027 (office)

Learn More…

2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Award Winners Honored at ISC East[5]

References

  1. ^ [email protected] (americansecuritytoday.com)
  2. ^ Categories & Opportunities (americansecuritytoday.com)
  3. ^ 2018 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program (americansecuritytoday.com)
  4. ^ [email protected] (americansecuritytoday.com)
  5. ^ 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Award Winners Honored at ISC East (americansecuritytoday.com)
  6. ^ Man Convicted for Making Bomb Parts to Kill American Soldiers in Iraq (americansecuritytoday.com)
  7. ^ Senstar Symphony Intelligent VMS Has a New Home (Learn More, Video) (americansecuritytoday.com)
0

2018 'ASTORS' Homeland Security Awards Open for Early Entries

Michael Madsen, AST Publisher, Cliff Quiroga, Vice President for Sharp Robotics Business Development and the team’s Director of Marketing, Alice DiSanto
Michael Madsen, AST Publisher, with 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Sponsor Cliff Quiroga, Vice President for Sharp Robotics Business Development, and the team’s Director of Marketing, Alice DiSanto

2018 ASTORSAmerican Security Today is pleased to announce that Early Entry Nominations are being accepted for the 2018 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program – the most Comprehensive Awards Program in the Industry, through April 25th, 2018.

Acknowledge the Most Distinguished Vendors of Physical, IT, Cyber, Port of Entry Security, Law Enforcement, First Responders, Perimeter Protection, Communications as well as Federal, State, County and Municipal Government Agencies in Acknowledgment of Their Outstanding Efforts to: ‘Keep our Nation Safe – One City at a Time’

AST-Image-of-Eagle-and-Flag-resized-2

Access Control/ Identification Personal/Protective Equipment Law Enforcement Counter Terrorism
Perimeter Barrier/ Deterrent System Interagency Interdiction Operation Cloud Computing/Storage Solution
Facial/IRIS Recognition Body Worn Video Product Cyber Security
Video Surveillance/VMS Mobile Technology Anti-Malware
Audio Analytics Disaster Preparedness ID Management
Thermal/Infrared Camera Mass Notification System Fire & Safety
Metal/Weapon Detection Rescue Operations Critical Infrastructure
License Plate Recognition Detection Products And Many Others!

Don’t see a Direct Hit for your Product, Agency or Organization?

Submit your category recommendation for consideration to Michael Madsen, AST Publisher at: [email protected][1].

AST

Please View our Complete List of Categories & Opportunities[2] for Your Organization to Compete and Distinguish Your Achievements in this Exclusive Opportunity to receive the Recognition Your Public Safety, Law Enforcement & Homeland Security Deserves.

AST banner

AST focuses on New and Evolving Security Threats at All Levels of Homeland Security and Public Safety for personnel who are on the front lines of protecting our communities, cities and nation.

• Compelling, attractive and easy to read digital publications delivered daily to a select readership of over 70,000 decision makers in the American security and homeland security fields
• Compelling, attractive and easy to read digital publications delivered daily, weekly and monthly to a select readership of over 70,000 decision makers in the American security and homeland security fields

AST reaches both the private and public experts, essential to meeting today’s growing security challenges, including:

  • Federal, State & Local Government Agencies & Law Enforcement Organizations, Private Security Agencies… Security Directors… Port Directors… Airport Directors… IT/Cyber Security Directors & More
  • Transportation Hubs, Public Assemblies, Government Facilities, Sports Arenas, our Nation’s Schools, Higher Education Campuses and Commercial Business Destinations – are all enticing targets for extremist attacks due to the large numbers of persons and resources clustered together
  • The new integration, where major applications such as Perimeter Protection, Video Surveillance, Access Control and Alarm Systems communicate with one another in a variety of solutions to protect our Cities and Critical Infrastructure
  • Expanded readership into vital Critical Infrastructure audiences such as protection of Nuclear Facilities, Water Plants & Dams, Bridges & Tunnels and other potential targets of terrorism

local-800

The AST Digital Publications is distributed to over 70,000 qualified government and homeland security professionals in federal, state and local levels.

AST puts forward the Largest and Most Qualified Circulation in Government with Over 70,000 readers on the Federal, State and Local levels.

‘PROTECTING OUR NATION, ONE CITY AT A TIME’

Harness the Power of the Web – with our 100% Mobile Friendly Publications

American Security Today’s 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Awards Presentation Luncheon at ISC East was an overwhelming success, with distinguished guests from National, State and Local Governments, and Industry Leading Corporate Executives from companies allied to Government.

Over 100 professionals gathered from across North America and the Middle East to be honored from disciplines across the Security Industry in their respective fields which included:

  • The Department of Homeland Security
  • The Department of Justice
  • The Security Exchange Commission
  • State and Municipal Law Enforcement Agencies, and
  • Leaders in Private Security

Recognized for their Innovative Training and Education Programs, Outstanding Product Development Achievements and Exciting New Technologies to address the growing Homeland Security Threats our Nation is facing.

The 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Presentation Luncheon
The 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Presentation Luncheon

AST’s publisher Michael Madsen, has announced an AST ‘ASTORS’ Awards Preview Edition to be published in an upcoming AST Magazine – a Full Feature Issue devoted to the competing firms and their achievements with an introduction to our 70,000+ readers – so Enter Today!

american-security-expo-luncheon

The highlight of the 2018 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program will be the Awards Presentation Luncheon at ISC East at the Javits Convention Center on Wednesday, November 14th.[3]

AST focuses on New and Evolving Security Threats at All Levels of Homeland Security and Public Safety for personnel who are on the front lines of protecting our communities, cities and nation.

AST reaches both the private and public experts, essential to meeting today’s growing security challenges.

For Sponsorship Opportunities and More Information on the AST 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program, please contact Michael Madsen, AST Publisher at: [email protected][4] or call 732.233.8119 (mobile) or 646-450-6027 (office)

Learn More…

2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Award Winners Honored at ISC East[5]

References

  1. ^ [email protected] (americansecuritytoday.com)
  2. ^ Categories & Opportunities (americansecuritytoday.com)
  3. ^ 2018 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program (americansecuritytoday.com)
  4. ^ [email protected] (americansecuritytoday.com)
  5. ^ 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Award Winners Honored at ISC East (americansecuritytoday.com)
  6. ^ Man Convicted for Making Bomb Parts to Kill American Soldiers in Iraq (americansecuritytoday.com)
  7. ^ Senstar Symphony Intelligent VMS Has a New Home (Learn More, Video) (americansecuritytoday.com)
0

2018 'ASTORS' Homeland Security Awards Open for Early Entries

Michael Madsen, AST Publisher, Cliff Quiroga, Vice President for Sharp Robotics Business Development and the team’s Director of Marketing, Alice DiSanto
Michael Madsen, AST Publisher, with 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Sponsor Cliff Quiroga, Vice President for Sharp Robotics Business Development, and the team’s Director of Marketing, Alice DiSanto

2018 ASTORSAmerican Security Today is pleased to announce that Early Entry Nominations are being accepted for the 2018 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program – the most Comprehensive Awards Program in the Industry, through April 25th, 2018.

Acknowledge the Most Distinguished Vendors of Physical, IT, Cyber, Port of Entry Security, Law Enforcement, First Responders, Perimeter Protection, Communications as well as Federal, State, County and Municipal Government Agencies in Acknowledgment of Their Outstanding Efforts to: ‘Keep our Nation Safe – One City at a Time’

AST-Image-of-Eagle-and-Flag-resized-2

Access Control/ Identification Personal/Protective Equipment Law Enforcement Counter Terrorism
Perimeter Barrier/ Deterrent System Interagency Interdiction Operation Cloud Computing/Storage Solution
Facial/IRIS Recognition Body Worn Video Product Cyber Security
Video Surveillance/VMS Mobile Technology Anti-Malware
Audio Analytics Disaster Preparedness ID Management
Thermal/Infrared Camera Mass Notification System Fire & Safety
Metal/Weapon Detection Rescue Operations Critical Infrastructure
License Plate Recognition Detection Products And Many Others!

Don’t see a Direct Hit for your Product, Agency or Organization?

Submit your category recommendation for consideration to Michael Madsen, AST Publisher at: [email protected][1].

AST

Please View our Complete List of Categories & Opportunities[2] for Your Organization to Compete and Distinguish Your Achievements in this Exclusive Opportunity to receive the Recognition Your Public Safety, Law Enforcement & Homeland Security Deserves.

AST banner

AST focuses on New and Evolving Security Threats at All Levels of Homeland Security and Public Safety for personnel who are on the front lines of protecting our communities, cities and nation.

• Compelling, attractive and easy to read digital publications delivered daily to a select readership of over 70,000 decision makers in the American security and homeland security fields
• Compelling, attractive and easy to read digital publications delivered daily, weekly and monthly to a select readership of over 70,000 decision makers in the American security and homeland security fields

AST reaches both the private and public experts, essential to meeting today’s growing security challenges, including:

  • Federal, State & Local Government Agencies & Law Enforcement Organizations, Private Security Agencies… Security Directors… Port Directors… Airport Directors… IT/Cyber Security Directors & More
  • Transportation Hubs, Public Assemblies, Government Facilities, Sports Arenas, our Nation’s Schools, Higher Education Campuses and Commercial Business Destinations – are all enticing targets for extremist attacks due to the large numbers of persons and resources clustered together
  • The new integration, where major applications such as Perimeter Protection, Video Surveillance, Access Control and Alarm Systems communicate with one another in a variety of solutions to protect our Cities and Critical Infrastructure
  • Expanded readership into vital Critical Infrastructure audiences such as protection of Nuclear Facilities, Water Plants & Dams, Bridges & Tunnels and other potential targets of terrorism

local-800

The AST Digital Publications is distributed to over 70,000 qualified government and homeland security professionals in federal, state and local levels.

AST puts forward the Largest and Most Qualified Circulation in Government with Over 70,000 readers on the Federal, State and Local levels.

‘PROTECTING OUR NATION, ONE CITY AT A TIME’

Harness the Power of the Web – with our 100% Mobile Friendly Publications

American Security Today’s 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Awards Presentation Luncheon at ISC East was an overwhelming success, with distinguished guests from National, State and Local Governments, and Industry Leading Corporate Executives from companies allied to Government.

Over 100 professionals gathered from across North America and the Middle East to be honored from disciplines across the Security Industry in their respective fields which included:

  • The Department of Homeland Security
  • The Department of Justice
  • The Security Exchange Commission
  • State and Municipal Law Enforcement Agencies, and
  • Leaders in Private Security

Recognized for their Innovative Training and Education Programs, Outstanding Product Development Achievements and Exciting New Technologies to address the growing Homeland Security Threats our Nation is facing.

The 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Presentation Luncheon
The 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Presentation Luncheon

AST’s publisher Michael Madsen, has announced an AST ‘ASTORS’ Awards Preview Edition to be published in an upcoming AST Magazine – a Full Feature Issue devoted to the competing firms and their achievements with an introduction to our 70,000+ readers – so Enter Today!

american-security-expo-luncheon

The highlight of the 2018 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program will be the Awards Presentation Luncheon at ISC East at the Javits Convention Center on Wednesday, November 14th.[3]

AST focuses on New and Evolving Security Threats at All Levels of Homeland Security and Public Safety for personnel who are on the front lines of protecting our communities, cities and nation.

AST reaches both the private and public experts, essential to meeting today’s growing security challenges.

For Sponsorship Opportunities and More Information on the AST 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program, please contact Michael Madsen, AST Publisher at: [email protected][4] or call 732.233.8119 (mobile) or 646-450-6027 (office)

Learn More…

2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Award Winners Honored at ISC East[5]

References

  1. ^ [email protected] (americansecuritytoday.com)
  2. ^ Categories & Opportunities (americansecuritytoday.com)
  3. ^ 2018 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Awards Program (americansecuritytoday.com)
  4. ^ [email protected] (americansecuritytoday.com)
  5. ^ 2017 ‘ASTORS’ Homeland Security Award Winners Honored at ISC East (americansecuritytoday.com)
  6. ^ Man Convicted for Making Bomb Parts to Kill American Soldiers in Iraq (americansecuritytoday.com)
  7. ^ Senstar Symphony Intelligent VMS Has a New Home (Learn More, Video) (americansecuritytoday.com)
0

Rheinmetall intensifies push to enter US Army combat vehicle fleet protection program

UNTERLUESS, Germany — With potential fiscal 2018 funding that would cover the qualification of another Active Protection System for U.S. Army combat vehicles waiting in the wings for congressional approval, Rheinmetall made another push[1] to show the service that it has a ready and working system this week at its Germany-based proving grounds.

The company hosted a number of U.S. Army representatives March 7, firing three rocket propelled grenades (RPG) 7 Vs at its Active Defense System (ADS), a distributed APS configuration — as opposed to a launcher-based APS system — that uses an explosive charge to blast incoming weapons off their paths in extremely close proximity to the vehicle. The explosive cuts at an angle downward on a threat roughly one meter from the hull of the vehicle and disables its main charge, drastically minimizing an explosion.

The U.S. delegation present for the demonstration included Elizabeth Miller, the deputy product manager for the Army’s Vehicle Protection Systems as well as Clifton Boyd, the deputy project manager for the Stryker Brigade Combat Team.

Putting ADS to the test

Rheinmetall took pains to challenge the system in front of the delegation, cluttering the environment around the system, which was positioned on a rig to represent a combat vehicle.

Using old cars and mannequins, the company painted a picture of a crowded urban market place. And while obviously unplanned, the demonstration was performed in a mix of snow and rain, adding to the complexity.

For the demonstration, Rheinmetall crafted a scenario that could occur during combat operations.

Kicking it off, two roadside bombs are detonated in front of and behind a convoy of combat vehicles move through a crowded marketplace, causing the vehicles to come to a halt. A suicide bomber in a car then drives into another car and explodes.

Sign up for our Daily News Roundup
The top Defense News stories of the day
Thanks for signing up!

As the explosion causes mayhem around the convoy, two RPGs are fired, one aimed directly at the ADS system and another at a vehicle behind the rig. The second RPG was meant to demonstrate that the ADS system will only trigger if the RPG is headed directly at the system.

Rheinmetall’s Rapid Obscuring System – ROSY – was supposed to deploy, enshrouding the vehicle in thick smoke to deter further RPG attacks, but a small piece of shrapnel from a previous explosion severed a wire connecting the system on the rig and it failed to work.

With the vehicle still visible to the attackers, another RPG is fired at the system.

When the smoke clears, the ADS system’s rig shows clear signs it worked. The only evidence of an RPG attack are small pock marks on one side of the rig and white residue on the other side.

Rheinmetall subsequently demonstrated ROSY using a small Polaris ultralight RZR vehicle equipped with the system. The vehicle drove through the scene deploying smoke. In less than a second, nothing in the area was visible.

Rheinmetall sets sites on U.S.

Over a year ago, the U.S. Army determined it needed to field an interim APS solution for the Abrams tank as well as the Stryker combat vehicle and the Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle. The service decided to rapidly assess off-the-shelf APS systems to fulfill an urgent operational need after failing – over a 20 year period – to field APS system.

The U.S. Army program manager for APS has said if more funding became available to qualify another system, ADS would be at the top of the list and came in a close second in a design runoff against Iron Fist.

The Army ultimately selected three different systems: Israeli company Rafael’s Trophy system, which is deployed in the Israeli army, for Abrams; Iron Fist from IMI[2], another Israeli company, for the Bradley; and Herndon, Virginia-based Artis’ Iron Curtain[3] for Stryker.

While the Army has stayed on track with Abrams[4], due to a combination of earlier funding availability and qualifying an already fielded system, it has struggled to stay on schedule with the other two configurations. Iron Curtain is six months behind and Iron Fist is delayed by eight months.

Col. Glenn Dean, who is in charge of the program, told Defense News in a recent interview that Iron Curtain turned out to not be as mature as the service originally envisioned and that there was some “friction on the test range.”

Unlike ADS, Iron Curtain uses a projectile-like countermeasure to defeat threats before they have a chance to explode, and similar to the German system, Iron Curtain takes out incoming threats very close into the vehicle.

With Iron Curtain’s fate potentially uncertain, Rheinmetall has an opportunity to swoop in in if it receives FY-18 government funding to qualify its system with the U.S. Army.

The demonstration comes at an important time, as Congress could potentially pass the FY18 defense budget this month as another continuing resolution comes to an end. That deadline will force Congress to either vote to continue to fund the Defense Department at last year’s levels or finally reach a budget deal.

A growing track record

Rheinmetall believes its testing and demonstrations performed over many years on a variety of combat vehicles makes it ready to step up to the task for the U.S. Army. And it has sold the system to a non-NATO country.

While the company wouldn’t name the country, it has been published publicly that Singapore bought the system for its Leopard tanks.

Rheinmetall has extensively tested the system for the Swedish government as well as for its own country and it has formulated designs for integration onto a wide variety of vehicles to include an eight-wheel drive vehicle similar to the Stryker.

The system has successfully demonstrated it can defeat anti-tank rounds, anti-tank guided missiles and decoy ATRs.

Rheinmetall's Active Defense System (ADS) hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company's proving grounds in Germany. (Photo by Jen Judson/Defense News staff)

Rheinmetall's Active Defense System (ADS) hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company's proving grounds in Germany. (Photo by Jen Judson/Defense News staff)

Rheinmetall’s Active Defense System (ADS) hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company’s proving grounds in Germany. (Photo by Jen Judson/Defense News staff)

During tests with the Swedish army, 76 percent of shots left zero residual penetration on the vehicle. The rest of the shots – save 6 percent — left damage measured in millimeters. The remaining 6 percent of the shots were not defeated, resulting in full penetration, according to Dr. Ron Meixner, an engineer at Rheinmetall.

He noted the shots which were not defeated during those tests were due to the detonator being used at the time. The system now has a new detonator that is safer and more reliable and “current trials show that this problem has been eliminated,” Meixner said.

The success rate for residual penetration of less than 20mm is 94 percent, he added.

Additionally, because the system is designed to defeat the incoming threat in close proximity, there is a wider radius around the vehicle where soldiers can operate safely and where civilians can be present without being harmed by collateral damage, Meixner explained.

While one mannequin’s plastic head was found in a pool of mud on the range post-test, its body was still standing and, along with the rest of the mannequins, simply splattered in mud.

For APS systems that defeat threats farther out from the vehicle, the area where soldiers can operate near the vehicle is more limited.

The system’s radar is also capable of weeding through the clutter of a busy urban environment and can precisely distinguish the type of incoming threat so the system can fine-tune its response depending on what kind of projectile is fired at the vehicle, Meixner said.

Rheinmetall has done everything it can to confuse the system’s radar, including building a leaf tosser to send leaves into the air around the system to see if it would throw the system off, but the radar has been able to detect threats appropriately in every scenario the company has thrown at it.

And while many radars turn vehicles into easy targets in an environment where an adversary can detect signals in an electromagnetic environment, the radar in ADS is low-power enough to limit its detection in the spectrum, according to Meixner.

Increasing appetite

APS systems have been in development for roughly 40 years. The Russians first developed a system in the 1970s. But it’s only now that countries including the U.S. Army are getting serious about the capability.

Countries looking for APS now include a number of European countries. Poland, for instance, is serious about procuring something to protect its combat vehicles. Several military representatives also attended the March 7 demonstration from the Spanish army and said they were conducting a study to determine a requirement for APS.

Meixner theorized as to why countries are now just getting on board. “You have, for the first time, an autonomous system on the battlefield that is firing just by the decision the system itself makes, and of course, this is really scary.”

But Meixner equated the ADS system to an airbag, another autonomous system with explosives set up to respond autonomously when a car is in a crash.

Yet Rheinmetall has taken extra steps to ensure the safety of the system. The German government aided in funding safety certification of the system and signals, perhaps, the intension of Germany to ultimately field ADS to its combat vehicles as well.

References

  1. ^ Rheinmetall made another push (www.defensenews.com)
  2. ^ Iron Fist from IMI (www.defensenews.com)
  3. ^ Artis’ Iron Curtain (www.defensenews.com)
  4. ^ stayed on track with Abrams (www.defensenews.com)
0

Rheinmetall intensifies push to enter US Army combat vehicle fleet protection program

UNTERLUESS, Germany — With potential fiscal 2018 funding that would cover the qualification of another Active Protection System for U.S. Army combat vehicles waiting in the wings for congressional approval, Rheinmetall made another push[1] to show the service that it has a ready and working system this week at its Germany-based proving grounds.

The company hosted a number of U.S. Army representatives March 7, firing three rocket propelled grenades (RPG) 7 Vs at its Active Defense System (ADS), a distributed APS configuration — as opposed to a launcher-based APS system — that uses an explosive charge to blast incoming weapons off their paths in extremely close proximity to the vehicle. The explosive cuts at an angle downward on a threat roughly one meter from the hull of the vehicle and disables its main charge, drastically minimizing an explosion.

The U.S. delegation present for the demonstration included Elizabeth Miller, the deputy product manager for the Army’s Vehicle Protection Systems as well as Clifton Boyd, the deputy project manager for the Stryker Brigade Combat Team.

Putting ADS to the test

Rheinmetall took pains to challenge the system in front of the delegation, cluttering the environment around the system, which was positioned on a rig to represent a combat vehicle.

Using old cars and mannequins, the company painted a picture of a crowded urban market place. And while obviously unplanned, the demonstration was performed in a mix of snow and rain, adding to the complexity.

For the demonstration, Rheinmetall crafted a scenario that could occur during combat operations.

Kicking it off, two roadside bombs are detonated in front of and behind a convoy of combat vehicles move through a crowded marketplace, causing the vehicles to come to a halt. A suicide bomber in a car then drives into another car and explodes.

Sign up for our Daily News Roundup
The top Defense News stories of the day
Thanks for signing up!

As the explosion causes mayhem around the convoy, two RPGs are fired, one aimed directly at the ADS system and another at a vehicle behind the rig. The second RPG was meant to demonstrate that the ADS system will only trigger if the RPG is headed directly at the system.

Rheinmetall’s Rapid Obscuring System – ROSY – was supposed to deploy, enshrouding the vehicle in thick smoke to deter further RPG attacks, but a small piece of shrapnel from a previous explosion severed a wire connecting the system on the rig and it failed to work.

With the vehicle still visible to the attackers, another RPG is fired at the system.

When the smoke clears, the ADS system’s rig shows clear signs it worked. The only evidence of an RPG attack are small pock marks on one side of the rig and white residue on the other side.

Rheinmetall subsequently demonstrated ROSY using a small Polaris ultralight RZR vehicle equipped with the system. The vehicle drove through the scene deploying smoke. In less than a second, nothing in the area was visible.

Rheinmetall sets sites on U.S.

Over a year ago, the U.S. Army determined it needed to field an interim APS solution for the Abrams tank as well as the Stryker combat vehicle and the Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle. The service decided to rapidly assess off-the-shelf APS systems to fulfill an urgent operational need after failing – over a 20 year period – to field APS system.

The U.S. Army program manager for APS has said if more funding became available to qualify another system, ADS would be at the top of the list and came in a close second in a design runoff against Iron Fist.

The Army ultimately selected three different systems: Israeli company Rafael’s Trophy system, which is deployed in the Israeli army, for Abrams; Iron Fist from IMI[2], another Israeli company, for the Bradley; and Herndon, Virginia-based Artis’ Iron Curtain[3] for Stryker.

While the Army has stayed on track with Abrams[4], due to a combination of earlier funding availability and qualifying an already fielded system, it has struggled to stay on schedule with the other two configurations. Iron Curtain is six months behind and Iron Fist is delayed by eight months.

Col. Glenn Dean, who is in charge of the program, told Defense News in a recent interview that Iron Curtain turned out to not be as mature as the service originally envisioned and that there was some “friction on the test range.”

Unlike ADS, Iron Curtain uses a projectile-like countermeasure to defeat threats before they have a chance to explode, and similar to the German system, Iron Curtain takes out incoming threats very close into the vehicle.

With Iron Curtain’s fate potentially uncertain, Rheinmetall has an opportunity to swoop in in if it receives FY-18 government funding to qualify its system with the U.S. Army.

The demonstration comes at an important time, as Congress could potentially pass the FY18 defense budget this month as another continuing resolution comes to an end. That deadline will force Congress to either vote to continue to fund the Defense Department at last year’s levels or finally reach a budget deal.

A growing track record

Rheinmetall believes its testing and demonstrations performed over many years on a variety of combat vehicles makes it ready to step up to the task for the U.S. Army. And it has sold the system to a non-NATO country.

While the company wouldn’t name the country, it has been published publicly that Singapore bought the system for its Leopard tanks.

Rheinmetall has extensively tested the system for the Swedish government as well as for its own country and it has formulated designs for integration onto a wide variety of vehicles to include an eight-wheel drive vehicle similar to the Stryker.

The system has successfully demonstrated it can defeat anti-tank rounds, anti-tank guided missiles and decoy ATRs.

Rheinmetall's Active Defense System (ADS) hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company's proving grounds in Germany. (Photo by Jen Judson/Defense News staff)

Rheinmetall's Active Defense System (ADS) hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company's proving grounds in Germany. (Photo by Jen Judson/Defense News staff)

Rheinmetall’s Active Defense System (ADS) hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company’s proving grounds in Germany. (Photo by Jen Judson/Defense News staff)

During tests with the Swedish army, 76 percent of shots left zero residual penetration on the vehicle. The rest of the shots – save 6 percent — left damage measured in millimeters. The remaining 6 percent of the shots were not defeated, resulting in full penetration, according to Dr. Ron Meixner, an engineer at Rheinmetall.

He noted the shots which were not defeated during those tests were due to the detonator being used at the time. The system now has a new detonator that is safer and more reliable and “current trials show that this problem has been eliminated,” Meixner said.

The success rate for residual penetration of less than 20mm is 94 percent, he added.

Additionally, because the system is designed to defeat the incoming threat in close proximity, there is a wider radius around the vehicle where soldiers can operate safely and where civilians can be present without being harmed by collateral damage, Meixner explained.

While one mannequin’s plastic head was found in a pool of mud on the range post-test, its body was still standing and, along with the rest of the mannequins, simply splattered in mud.

For APS systems that defeat threats farther out from the vehicle, the area where soldiers can operate near the vehicle is more limited.

The system’s radar is also capable of weeding through the clutter of a busy urban environment and can precisely distinguish the type of incoming threat so the system can fine-tune its response depending on what kind of projectile is fired at the vehicle, Meixner said.

Rheinmetall has done everything it can to confuse the system’s radar, including building a leaf tosser to send leaves into the air around the system to see if it would throw the system off, but the radar has been able to detect threats appropriately in every scenario the company has thrown at it.

And while many radars turn vehicles into easy targets in an environment where an adversary can detect signals in an electromagnetic environment, the radar in ADS is low-power enough to limit its detection in the spectrum, according to Meixner.

Increasing appetite

APS systems have been in development for roughly 40 years. The Russians first developed a system in the 1970s. But it’s only now that countries including the U.S. Army are getting serious about the capability.

Countries looking for APS now include a number of European countries. Poland, for instance, is serious about procuring something to protect its combat vehicles. Several military representatives also attended the March 7 demonstration from the Spanish army and said they were conducting a study to determine a requirement for APS.

Meixner theorized as to why countries are now just getting on board. “You have, for the first time, an autonomous system on the battlefield that is firing just by the decision the system itself makes, and of course, this is really scary.”

But Meixner equated the ADS system to an airbag, another autonomous system with explosives set up to respond autonomously when a car is in a crash.

Yet Rheinmetall has taken extra steps to ensure the safety of the system. The German government aided in funding safety certification of the system and signals, perhaps, the intension of Germany to ultimately field ADS to its combat vehicles as well.

References

  1. ^ Rheinmetall made another push (www.defensenews.com)
  2. ^ Iron Fist from IMI (www.defensenews.com)
  3. ^ Artis’ Iron Curtain (www.defensenews.com)
  4. ^ stayed on track with Abrams (www.defensenews.com)
0

Rheinmetall intensifies push to enter US Army combat vehicle fleet protection program

UNTERLUESS, Germany — With potential fiscal 2018 funding that would cover the qualification of another Active Protection System for U.S. Army combat vehicles waiting in the wings for congressional approval, Rheinmetall made another push[1] to show the service that it has a ready and working system this week at its Germany-based proving grounds.

The company hosted a number of U.S. Army representatives March 7, firing three rocket propelled grenades (RPG) 7 Vs at its Active Defense System (ADS), a distributed APS configuration — as opposed to a launcher-based APS system — that uses an explosive charge to blast incoming weapons off their paths in extremely close proximity to the vehicle. The explosive cuts at an angle downward on a threat roughly one meter from the hull of the vehicle and disables its main charge, drastically minimizing an explosion.

The U.S. delegation present for the demonstration included Elizabeth Miller, the deputy product manager for the Army’s Vehicle Protection Systems as well as Clifton Boyd, the deputy project manager for the Stryker Brigade Combat Team.

Putting ADS to the test

Rheinmetall took pains to challenge the system in front of the delegation, cluttering the environment around the system, which was positioned on a rig to represent a combat vehicle.

Using old cars and mannequins, the company painted a picture of a crowded urban market place. And while obviously unplanned, the demonstration was performed in a mix of snow and rain, adding to the complexity.

For the demonstration, Rheinmetall crafted a scenario that could occur during combat operations.

Kicking it off, two roadside bombs are detonated in front of and behind a convoy of combat vehicles move through a crowded marketplace, causing the vehicles to come to a halt. A suicide bomber in a car then drives into another car and explodes.

Sign up for our Daily News Roundup
The top Defense News stories of the day
Thanks for signing up!

As the explosion causes mayhem around the convoy, two RPGs are fired, one aimed directly at the ADS system and another at a vehicle behind the rig. The second RPG was meant to demonstrate that the ADS system will only trigger if the RPG is headed directly at the system.

Rheinmetall’s Rapid Obscuring System – ROSY – was supposed to deploy, enshrouding the vehicle in thick smoke to deter further RPG attacks, but a small piece of shrapnel from a previous explosion severed a wire connecting the system on the rig and it failed to work.

With the vehicle still visible to the attackers, another RPG is fired at the system.

When the smoke clears, the ADS system’s rig shows clear signs it worked. The only evidence of an RPG attack are small pock marks on one side of the rig and white residue on the other side.

Rheinmetall subsequently demonstrated ROSY using a small Polaris ultralight RZR vehicle equipped with the system. The vehicle drove through the scene deploying smoke. In less than a second, nothing in the area was visible.

Rheinmetall sets sites on U.S.

Over a year ago, the U.S. Army determined it needed to field an interim APS solution for the Abrams tank as well as the Stryker combat vehicle and the Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle. The service decided to rapidly assess off-the-shelf APS systems to fulfill an urgent operational need after failing – over a 20 year period – to field APS system.

The U.S. Army program manager for APS has said if more funding became available to qualify another system, ADS would be at the top of the list and came in a close second in a design runoff against Iron Fist.

The Army ultimately selected three different systems: Israeli company Rafael’s Trophy system, which is deployed in the Israeli army, for Abrams; Iron Fist from IMI[2], another Israeli company, for the Bradley; and Herndon, Virginia-based Artis’ Iron Curtain[3] for Stryker.

While the Army has stayed on track with Abrams[4], due to a combination of earlier funding availability and qualifying an already fielded system, it has struggled to stay on schedule with the other two configurations. Iron Curtain is six months behind and Iron Fist is delayed by eight months.

Col. Glenn Dean, who is in charge of the program, told Defense News in a recent interview that Iron Curtain turned out to not be as mature as the service originally envisioned and that there was some “friction on the test range.”

Unlike ADS, Iron Curtain uses a projectile-like countermeasure to defeat threats before they have a chance to explode, and similar to the German system, Iron Curtain takes out incoming threats very close into the vehicle.

With Iron Curtain’s fate potentially uncertain, Rheinmetall has an opportunity to swoop in in if it receives FY-18 government funding to qualify its system with the U.S. Army.

The demonstration comes at an important time, as Congress could potentially pass the FY18 defense budget this month as another continuing resolution comes to an end. That deadline will force Congress to either vote to continue to fund the Defense Department at last year’s levels or finally reach a budget deal.

A growing track record

Rheinmetall believes its testing and demonstrations performed over many years on a variety of combat vehicles makes it ready to step up to the task for the U.S. Army. And it has sold the system to a non-NATO country.

While the company wouldn’t name the country, it has been published publicly that Singapore bought the system for its Leopard tanks.

Rheinmetall has extensively tested the system for the Swedish government as well as for its own country and it has formulated designs for integration onto a wide variety of vehicles to include an eight-wheel drive vehicle similar to the Stryker.

The system has successfully demonstrated it can defeat anti-tank rounds, anti-tank guided missiles and decoy ATRs.

Rheinmetall's Active Defense System (ADS) hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company's proving grounds in Germany. (Photo by Jen Judson/Defense News staff)

Rheinmetall's Active Defense System (ADS) hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company's proving grounds in Germany. (Photo by Jen Judson/Defense News staff)

Rheinmetall’s Active Defense System (ADS) hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company’s proving grounds in Germany. (Photo by Jen Judson/Defense News staff)

During tests with the Swedish army, 76 percent of shots left zero residual penetration on the vehicle. The rest of the shots – save 6 percent — left damage measured in millimeters. The remaining 6 percent of the shots were not defeated, resulting in full penetration, according to Dr. Ron Meixner, an engineer at Rheinmetall.

He noted the shots which were not defeated during those tests were due to the detonator being used at the time. The system now has a new detonator that is safer and more reliable and “current trials show that this problem has been eliminated,” Meixner said.

The success rate for residual penetration of less than 20mm is 94 percent, he added.

Additionally, because the system is designed to defeat the incoming threat in close proximity, there is a wider radius around the vehicle where soldiers can operate safely and where civilians can be present without being harmed by collateral damage, Meixner explained.

While one mannequin’s plastic head was found in a pool of mud on the range post-test, its body was still standing and, along with the rest of the mannequins, simply splattered in mud.

For APS systems that defeat threats farther out from the vehicle, the area where soldiers can operate near the vehicle is more limited.

The system’s radar is also capable of weeding through the clutter of a busy urban environment and can precisely distinguish the type of incoming threat so the system can fine-tune its response depending on what kind of projectile is fired at the vehicle, Meixner said.

Rheinmetall has done everything it can to confuse the system’s radar, including building a leaf tosser to send leaves into the air around the system to see if it would throw the system off, but the radar has been able to detect threats appropriately in every scenario the company has thrown at it.

And while many radars turn vehicles into easy targets in an environment where an adversary can detect signals in an electromagnetic environment, the radar in ADS is low-power enough to limit its detection in the spectrum, according to Meixner.

Increasing appetite

APS systems have been in development for roughly 40 years. The Russians first developed a system in the 1970s. But it’s only now that countries including the U.S. Army are getting serious about the capability.

Countries looking for APS now include a number of European countries. Poland, for instance, is serious about procuring something to protect its combat vehicles. Several military representatives also attended the March 7 demonstration from the Spanish army and said they were conducting a study to determine a requirement for APS.

Meixner theorized as to why countries are now just getting on board. “You have, for the first time, an autonomous system on the battlefield that is firing just by the decision the system itself makes, and of course, this is really scary.”

But Meixner equated the ADS system to an airbag, another autonomous system with explosives set up to respond autonomously when a car is in a crash.

Yet Rheinmetall has taken extra steps to ensure the safety of the system. The German government aided in funding safety certification of the system and signals, perhaps, the intension of Germany to ultimately field ADS to its combat vehicles as well.

References

  1. ^ Rheinmetall made another push (www.defensenews.com)
  2. ^ Iron Fist from IMI (www.defensenews.com)
  3. ^ Artis’ Iron Curtain (www.defensenews.com)
  4. ^ stayed on track with Abrams (www.defensenews.com)
0

Rheinmetall intensifies push to enter US Army combat vehicle fleet protection program

UNTERLUESS, Germany — Germany company Rheinmetall has made another push[1] to show the U.S. Army that it has a ready and working active protection system. The company’s marketing effort this week at its Germany-based proving grounds comes as potential fiscal 2018 funding would cover the qualification of another APS for Army combat vehicles waiting in the wings for congressional approval.

The company hosted a number of U.S. Army representatives March 7, firing three RPG-7Vs at its active defense system (ADS), a distributed APS configuration — as opposed to a launcher-based APS system. The ADS uses an explosive charge to blast incoming weapons off their paths in extremely close proximity to the vehicle. The explosive cuts at a downward angle on a threat roughly 1 meter from the vehicle’s hull, disabling the threat’s main charge and drastically minimizing an explosion.

The U.S. delegation present for the demonstration included Elizabeth Miller, the deputy product manager for the Army’s vehicle protection systems, and Clifton Boyd, the deputy project manager for the Stryker brigade combat team effort.

Putting ADS to the test

Rheinmetall took pains to challenge the system in front of the delegation, cluttering the environment around the system, which was positioned on a rig to represent a combat vehicle.

Using old cars and mannequins, the company painted a picture of a crowded urban marketplace. And though unplanned, the demonstration was performed in a mix of snow and rain, adding to the complexity.

For the demonstration, Rheinmetall crafted a scenario that could occur during combat operations:

Two roadside bombs detonate in front of and behind a convoy of combat vehicles as they move through a crowded marketplace, causing the vehicles to come to a halt. A suicide bomber in a car then drives into another car and explodes.

Sign up for our Daily News Roundup
The top Defense News stories of the day
Thanks for signing up!

As the explosion causes mayhem around the convoy, two rocket-propelled grenades are fired, one aimed directly at the ADS system and another at a vehicle behind the rig. The second RPG was meant to demonstrate that the ADS system will only trigger if the RPG is directly headed toward the system.

Rheinmetall’s Rapid Obscuring System, or ROSY, was supposed to deploy, enshrouding the vehicle in thick smoke to deter further RPG attacks, but a small piece of shrapnel from a previous explosion severed a wire connecting the system on the rig and it failed to work.

With the vehicle still visible to the attackers, another RPG is fired at the system.

When the smoke clears, the ADS system’s rig shows clear signs it worked. The only evidence of an RPG attack are small pock marks on one side of the rig and white residue on the other side.

Rheinmetall subsequently demonstrated ROSY using a small Polaris ultralight RZR vehicle equipped with the system. The vehicle drove through the scene, deploying smoke. In less than a second, nothing in the area was visible.

Rheinmetall sets sites on US

More than a year ago, the Army determined it needed to field an interim APS solution for the Abrams tank as well as the Stryker combat vehicle and the Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle. The service decided to rapidly assess off-the-shelf APS systems to fulfill an urgent operational need after failing — over a 20 year period — to field an APS system.

The Army’s program manager for APS has said if more funding became available to qualify another system, ADS would be at the top of the list and came in a close second in a design runoff against Iron Fist.

The Army ultimately selected three different systems: Israeli company Rafael’s Trophy system, which is deployed in the Israeli Army, for the Abrams; Iron Fist from IMI Systems[2], another Israeli company, for the Bradley; and Herndon, Virginia-based Artis’ Iron Curtain[3] for the Stryker.

While the Army has stayed on track with Abrams[4], due to a combination of earlier funding availability and qualifying an already fielded system, it has struggled to stay on schedule with the other two configurations. Iron Curtain is six months behind, and Iron Fist is delayed by eight months.

Col. Glenn Dean, who is in charge of the program, told Defense News in a recent interview that Iron Curtain turned out to not be as mature as the service envisioned and that there was some “friction on the test range.”

Unlike ADS, Iron Curtain uses a projectile-like countermeasure to defeat threats before they have a chance to explode. And similar to the German system, Iron Curtain takes out incoming threats very close to the vehicle.

With Iron Curtain’s fate uncertain, Rheinmetall has an opportunity to swoop in if it receives FY18 government funding to qualify its system with the U.S. Army.

The demonstration comes at an important time, as Congress could potentially pass the FY18 defense budget this month. The upcoming deadline for a continuing resolution will force Congress to either vote to fund the Defense Department at last year’s levels or finally reach a budget deal.

A growing track record

Rheinmetall believes its testing and demonstrations performed over many years on a variety of combat vehicles makes it ready to step up to the task for the U.S. Army. The company has already sold the system to a non-NATO country.

Rheinmetall wouldn’t name the country, but it has been publicly announced Singapore bought the system for its Leopard tanks.

Rheinmetall has extensively tested the system for the Swedish government and for Germany, and it has formulated designs for integration onto a wide variety of vehicles to include an eight-wheel drive vehicle similar to the Stryker.

The system has successfully demonstrated it can defeat anti-tank rounds, anti-tank guided missiles and decoy ATRs.

Rheinmetall's Active Defense System was hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company's proving grounds in Germany. (Jen Judson/Staff)

Rheinmetall's Active Defense System was hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company's proving grounds in Germany. (Jen Judson/Staff)

Rheinmetall’s Active Defense System was hooked up to a rig before a complex demonstration of its capabilities at the company’s proving grounds in Germany. (Jen Judson/Staff)

During tests with the Swedish Army, 76 percent of shots left zero residual penetration on the vehicle. The rest of the shots — save 6 percent — left damage measured in millimeters. The remaining 6 percent of the shots were undefeated, resulting in full penetration, according to Ron Meixner, an engineer at Rheinmetall.

He blamed the undefeated shots on the specific detonator used inthe test. The system now has a new detonator that is safer and more reliable, according to Meixner, and “current trials show that this problem has been eliminated.”

The success rate for residual penetration of less than 20 millimeters is 94 percent, he added.

And because the system is designed to defeat an incoming threat at close proximity, there is a wider radius around the vehicle where soldiers can safely operate and where civilians can be present without being harmed by collateral damage, Meixner explained.

One mannequin’s plastic head was found in a pool of mud on the range post-test, its body still standing. The rest of the mannequins were simply splattered in mud.

For APS systems that defeat threats farther away from the vehicle, the area where soldiers can safely operate near the vehicle is more limited.

The system’s radar is also capable of weeding through the clutter of a busy urban environment and can precisely distinguish the type of incoming threat. That way the system can fine-tune its response depending on what kind of projectile is fired at the vehicle, Meixner said.

Rheinmetall has done everything it can to confuse the system’s radar, including building a leaf tosser to send leaves into the air around the system in an attempt to throw the system off. But the radar has been able to detect threats appropriately in every scenario the company has thrown at it.

And while many radars turn vehicles into easy targets in an environment where an adversary can detect signals in an electromagnetic environment, the radar in ADS is low-power enough to limit its detection in the spectrum, according to Meixner.

Increasing appetite

APS systems have been in development for roughly 40 years. The Russians first developed a system in the 1970s. But it’s only now that countries, including U.S., are getting serious about the capability.

Those looking for APS now include a number of European countries. Poland, for instance, is serious about procuring something to protect its combat vehicles. Several military representatives also attended the March 7 demonstration from the Spanish Army and said they were conducting a study to determine a requirement for APS.

Meixner theorized as to why countries are now just getting on board. “You have for the first time an autonomous system on the battlefield that is firing just by the decision the system itself makes, and of course this is really scary.”

But Meixner equated the ADS system to an air bag, another autonomous system with explosives set up to respond on its own when a car is in a crash.

Yet, Rheinmetall has taken extra steps to ensure the safety of the system. The German government aided in funding safety certification of the system and signals — perhaps a sign that Germany intends to ultimately field ADS to its combat vehicles, too.


References

  1. ^ Rheinmetall has made another push (www.defensenews.com)
  2. ^ Iron Fist from IMI Systems (www.defensenews.com)
  3. ^ Artis’ Iron Curtain (www.defensenews.com)
  4. ^ stayed on track with Abrams (www.defensenews.com)