Tagged: battle

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Lawmakers Move to Protect Fort Carson's 2nd Brigade Combat Team

Colorado’s congressional delegation and Gov. John Hickenlooper have sent a letter urging the Army[1] to keep Fort Carson[2]‘s 2nd Brigade Combat Team in town after it trades its infantry marching boots for armored vehicles.

And Colorado Springs Republican U.S. Rep. Doug Lamborn isn’t stopping there. He wants the Army to also send an 800-soldier security force assistance brigade to Colorado Springs.

“I would love to see us expand,” he said.

The Army announced late last month that it would re-equip Fort Carson’s 2nd Brigade Combat Team with tanks and Bradley armored fighting vehicles. But in the shift, the Army is studying whether the brigade should be moved, with posts in Georgia, Kansas and Texas in play for the brigade.

Fort Carson remains all but certain to keep the 4,000-soldier unit, because moving it elsewhere could cost nearly $200 million. That’s because the Colorado Springs post already has the infrastructure an armored brigade would need.

But it doesn’t hurt to have the state’s full political might on Fort Carson’s side, said Rich Burchfield, who heads defense programs for the Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce.

Burchfield said the lawmakers are adding an assurance to the Pentagon that moves to expand the post will have political backing and federal cash.

He also said keeping the brigade in town would be a boost for the troops involved. Colorado Springs remains the most-requested destination for soldiers.

“You’re looking at 4,400 soldiers and 6,000 family members who are already part of the community,” Burchfield said. “We have to keep our neighbors here in town.”

While keeping 2nd Brigade here is a top priority, Lamborn wants more.

The Army examining options to house a new security force assistance brigade and the congressman wants to woo it to the Rockies.

Assistance brigades are a new kind of Army formation aimed at training allied troops and helping them in battle. Born out of fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan, the assistance units would extend America’s reach in troubled regions while keeping deployed troop numbers low.

Lamborn said Fort Carson has a leg up in landing the unit thanks to the 10th Special Forces Group that’s already stationed here.

The 10th Group’s Green Berets are already expert at training foreign troops and Lamborn said having that experience handy would allow the new assistance brigade to “hit the ground running with a minimal length of time between activation and full operational capability.”

Lamborn also touted the popularity of Colorado Springs with troops in his pitch.

“Finally, I would point out the fact Colorado Springs sits in the congressional district with the largest number of veterans of any congressional district in the U.S.,” he wrote.

A final decision on the fate of 2nd Brigade is weeks away and any decision on an assistance brigade could take months.

But for now, the Army’s top brass knows that Colorado’s leaders love Fort Carson.

“Community support in our state for Fort Carson missions, personnel and families is unmatched,” the lawmakers said.

This article is written by Tom Roeder from The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colo.)[3] and was legally licensed via the Tribune Content Agency through the NewsCred[4] publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to [email protected][5].

Show Full Article[6]

© Copyright 2018 The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colo.). All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

References

  1. ^ Army (www.military.com)
  2. ^ Fort Carson (www.military.com)
  3. ^ The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colo.) (gazette.com)
  4. ^ NewsCred (www.newscred.com)
  5. ^ [email protected] (www.military.com)
  6. ^ Show Full Article (www.military.com)
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1ST BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM: 326th BEB provides diverse combat enablers

While most battalions have one primary role in its support of the brigade combat team, brigade engineer battalions provide multiple critical functions to enable combat operations.

Soldiers from 326th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, showcased their unit’s versatility during a weeklong field training exercise, March 12-Friday, at Fort Campbell’s training area.

The FTX prepared the battalion to better integrate into brigade-level combined arms training events. The FTX also certified certain elements on their mission essential tasks.

“The 326th BEB is the most unique battalion within the Bastogne brigade,” said Lt. Col. Jonathan Zimmer, 326th BEB commander, who often compares his battalion to a multipurpose tool. “Each tool performs a different function, and this is how our battalion supports the brigade.”

Those tools include six companies from which there are two engineer companies, a signal company, a military intelligence company, a forward support company and a headquarters and headquarters company.

Soldiers from A and B engineer companies conducted engineer qualification tables, Sapper missions focused on reconnaissance, mobility and counter mobility, and survivability operations.  “We have an area reconnaissance lane, and a complex obstacle breach lane, a route reconnaissance lane, and a complex obstacle emplacement lane where they are actually emplacing a deliberate crater and an 11-row wire obstacle,” said Capt. Benjamin Speckhart, A Co., 326th BEB commander.

The Soldiers of C Company, the signal company, performed retransmission and networking training, and sling load operations to hone their military occupational skill-specific and air assault skills.

The Soldiers of D Company, the military intelligence company, consists of three platoons – the unmanned aircraft system platoon that operates the RQ-7 Shadow UAS, a multi-function platoon that has signal and human intelligence capabilities, and an information collection platoon that, with the brigade intelligence section, analyzes information from all reconnaissance assets for Bastogne. The Soldiers conducted aerial reconnaissance missions in support of 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, 1st BCT, and 326th BEB’s platoon defensive live-fire exercises,

The forward support Soldiers of E Company increased their lethality during the platoon defensive live fire as well as conducted sling load operations to certify day and night aerial resupply missions. Additionally, the maintenance platoon conducted recovery operations, the field feeding section cooked and served meals for more than 500 Soldiers during the week, and the distribution platoon supported the entire battalion with fuel and ammo.

During the defensive live-fire exercise, the chemical reconnaissance platoon of Headquarters and Headquarters Company conducted decontamination training to increase the knowledge and skills for Soldiers throughout the battalion.

“We’re training on how to properly decontaminate equipment and vehicles so that in the case we are attacked, we can set up a decon line and get them back to the battle,” said Spc. Thomas Rivera, a CBRN specialist. This training is important because there are countries who are experimenting with chemicals, and there’s a history of chemicals being used, so I feel it is our responsibility to actually make sure everybody is prepared for such an attack.”  

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Vice chief: Women serve in every BCT battalion, but sexual harassment battle is far from over

Since the service lifted the final ban on women in direct-combat units[1] in 2016, more than 600 women have joined infantry and armor units[2], Gen. James McConville told an audience at the Army Women’s Summit on Capitol Hill.

“Every single infantry, armor and artillery battalion in every single active-duty brigade combat team has women assigned,” he said.

The Army is still tracking percentages as a gauge of its success with its Leaders First integration initiative, which transferred female officers and noncommissioned officers into the 82nd Airborne Division and 1st Cavalry Division, ahead of accepting graduated one-station training graduates last summer.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army’s infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

And, he added, 10 of those women are sporting Ranger tabs, since the course opened to women in 2015, with seven more in training now.

“I’d like to see the day in the near future where we no longer need to count percentages of individuals,” he said.

But women who do step up still face discrimination and, at the extreme, sexual assault from their fellow soldiers, and multiple audience members took the microphone to ask McConville about the Army’s efforts to prevent violence and mistreatment.

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McConville’s three children are active-duty soldiers, he said, including his daughter.

“She says it’s better than it used to be, but it’s no where near where it needs to be,” he said.

McConville encouraged survivors, men and women, to report, to give the Army an opportunity to prosecute predators to the fullest extent of the law.

“But they have to report, or we’re not going to fix it, as we go forward,” he said.

McConville likened sexual assault to friendly-fire negligence on the job, and suggested that commanders treat it the same way.

“If you’re on a range and you accidentally shot someone, and you hurt them, we would hold you accountable,” he said. “And we’d go through this whole process, and your fellow soldiers would look at you and say, ‘How could you do this to our fellow soldiers?’”

To combat assault and harassment within units, organizations need to start looking at them in the context of unit cohesiveness, he added.

“Sexual harassment and sexual assault is worse, because it’s intentional. It’s intentional fratricide,” he said. “Why would you commit intentional fratricide against one of your fellow soldiers?”

Similarly, the service’s Sexual Harassment and Assault Response and Prevention program should focus less on instilling fear of consequences in soldiers.

“What we have to do is get people to think beyond that,” he said. “What we need in the Army is cohesive teams of trusted professionals.”

Harassment and assault should be treated as readiness issues, he said.

“If you don’t treat them with dignity and respect, if you’re harassing them and assaulting them, what kind of organization are you going to have?” he said. “You’re an American soldier. You treat everyone with dignity and respect because that is the right thing to do.”

The Army has been encouraged by an increase in reporting numbers but a decrease in incidents over recent years, though conviction rates for both assaults and whistleblower retaliation remain low.

“We’re not there yet. We’ve got a long way to go,” McConville said.

References

  1. ^ direct-combat units (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ infantry and armor units (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Congress advances new sexual assault, harassment rules for the military (www.armytimes.com)
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Vice chief: Women serve in every BCT battalion, but sexual harassment battle is far from over

Since the service lifted the final ban on women in direct-combat units[1] in 2016, more than 600 women have joined infantry and armor units[2], Gen. James McConville told an audience at the Army Women’s Summit on Capitol Hill.

“Every single infantry, armor and artillery battalion in every single active-duty brigade combat team has women assigned,” he said.

The Army is still tracking percentages as a gauge of its success with its Leaders First integration initiative, which transferred female officers and noncommissioned officers into the 82nd Airborne Division and 1st Cavalry Division, ahead of accepting graduated one-station training graduates last summer.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army's infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

Hundreds of women have joined the Army’s infantry and armor units, but those who do step up still face discrimination from their fellow soldiers, says Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville.

And, he added, 10 of those women are sporting Ranger tabs, since the course opened to women in 2015, with seven more in training now.

“I’d like to see the day in the near future where we no longer need to count percentages of individuals,” he said.

But women who do step up still face discrimination and, at the extreme, sexual assault from their fellow soldiers, and multiple audience members took the microphone to ask McConville about the Army’s efforts to prevent violence and mistreatment.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

McConville’s three children are active-duty soldiers, he said, including his daughter.

“She says it’s better than it used to be, but it’s no where near where it needs to be,” he said.

McConville encouraged survivors, men and women, to report, to give the Army an opportunity to prosecute predators to the fullest extent of the law.

“But they have to report, or we’re not going to fix it, as we go forward,” he said.

McConville likened sexual assault to friendly-fire negligence on the job, and suggested that commanders treat it the same way.

“If you’re on a range and you accidentally shot someone, and you hurt them, we would hold you accountable,” he said. “And we’d go through this whole process, and your fellow soldiers would look at you and say, ‘How could you do this to our fellow soldiers?’”

To combat assault and harassment within units, organizations need to start looking at them in the context of unit cohesiveness, he added.

“Sexual harassment and sexual assault is worse, because it’s intentional. It’s intentional fratricide,” he said. “Why would you commit intentional fratricide against one of your fellow soldiers?”

Similarly, the service’s Sexual Harassment and Assault Response and Prevention program should focus less on instilling fear of consequences in soldiers.

“What we have to do is get people to think beyond that,” he said. “What we need in the Army is cohesive teams of trusted professionals.”

Harassment and assault should be treated as readiness issues, he said.

“If you don’t treat them with dignity and respect, if you’re harassing them and assaulting them, what kind of organization are you going to have?” he said. “You’re an American soldier. You treat everyone with dignity and respect because that is the right thing to do.”

The Army has been encouraged by an increase in reporting numbers but a decrease in incidents over recent years, though conviction rates for both assaults and whistleblower retaliation remain low.

“We’re not there yet. We’ve got a long way to go,” McConville said.

References

  1. ^ direct-combat units (www.armytimes.com)
  2. ^ infantry and armor units (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Congress advances new sexual assault, harassment rules for the military (www.armytimes.com)
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Troopers attend 1st Past and Present Garryowen Reunion

KEMPNER — More than 400 past and present troopers of the 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment “Garryowen,” gathered Saturday night for a first-of-a-kind Past and Present Garryowen Reunion at the Kempner Veterans of Foreign Wars post.

The unit, which was established July 28, 1866, is part of the 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, and is most well-known for its participation in the Battle of Little Big Horn under the command of Lt. Col. George A. Custer and for its victory against a vastly superior force during the Vietnam War at the IA Drang Valley under the command of Lt. Col. Hal Moore — a victory later portrayed in the Mel Gibson movie “We Were Soldiers.”

The unit’s history, stretching from the troopers’ bravery during the Indian Wars through countless victories in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Operation Desert Storm and into actions in Iraq during the War on Terror, prompted current and former members of the unit to bring everyone together to help foster the deep pride shared by the unit’s alumni in the newest generation of “Garryowen” troopers.

“I love this. I think this is great,” said Sgt. Janna M. Trevino, a combat medic with the squadron’s Headquarters and Headquarters Troop. “It’s inspiring. A lot of us are new to a (cavalry) unit and have no idea how the cavalry is run. To see all of these veterans and see everyone get together is great — it makes us want to stay motivated and positive while we do our work.”

Trevino, who sang the national anthem at the start of the ceremonies, said watching the interaction between young soldiers and the alumni troopers who served as far back as the Korean War was amazing.

“This is a very fast-paced unit. … The camaraderie is different. This is the type of stuff we need,” she said, adding that she would love to do something similar and more often in order to help foster a sense of pride for the unit within the newest troops who had never served with “Garryowen” before.

“The new privates who have just gotten here have got to experience this,” Trevino said. “Being able to see people who have so much experience in the military. … This is just so great.”

Lt. Gen. Paul Funk, III Corps and Fort Hood commander and a former “Garryowen” commander, even sent a video to the troopers from the Middle East, where he currently command Operation Inherent Resolve — the international coalition to defeat the Islamic State.

“I am even more proud I can hold my head high and say that I am a Garryowen trooper, just like you,” Funk said in the video. “All Garryowen troopers have one thing in common — tenacity, the single most important trait of a trooper. That fixed resolve not to quit when things get tough.”

Retired Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III, a former command sergeant major for the squadron and the 14th sergeant major of the Army, also offered some words of encouragement for all the troopers at the event, both past and present.

“My time in 1/7 Cav for me was the most pivotal and most memorable part of my military career,” he said. “A lot of people ask me, ‘do you miss the Army?’ Hell no, I do not. What I do miss is you. It’s that blood we shared over in Iraq and unfortunately the lives we lost and those who suffer from the visible wounds of war and those who suffer from invisible wounds.

“I just want to tell each and every one of you, thank you for helping to shape my life and for teaching me one of the most important things — that honor is the most important value,” Chandler added. “It’s what makes Garryowen, the 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, the pride of not only the 1st Cavalry Division, but as far as I’m concerned, the rest of the United States Army.”

Plans have already begun for the 2019 reunion, which will occur once the unit returns from an upcoming deployment to Europe with the 1st Brigade.

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Troopers attend 1st Past and Present Garryowen Reunion

KEMPNER — More than 400 past and present troopers of the 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment “Garryowen,” gathered Saturday night for a first-of-a-kind Past and Present Garryowen Reunion at the Kempner Veterans of Foreign Wars post.

The unit, which was established July 28, 1866, is part of the 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, and is most well-known for its participation in the Battle of Little Big Horn under the command of Lt. Col. George A. Custer and for its victory against a vastly superior force during the Vietnam War at the IA Drang Valley under the command of Lt. Col. Hal Moore — a victory later portrayed in the Mel Gibson movie “We Were Soldiers.”

The unit’s history, stretching from the troopers’ bravery during the Indian Wars through countless victories in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Operation Desert Storm and into actions in Iraq during the War on Terror, prompted current and former members of the unit to bring everyone together to help foster the deep pride shared by the unit’s alumni in the newest generation of “Garryowen” troopers.

“I love this. I think this is great,” said Sgt. Janna M. Trevino, a combat medic with the squadron’s Headquarters and Headquarters Troop. “It’s inspiring. A lot of us are new to a (cavalry) unit and have no idea how the cavalry is run. To see all of these veterans and see everyone get together is great — it makes us want to stay motivated and positive while we do our work.”

Trevino, who sang the national anthem at the start of the ceremonies, said watching the interaction between young soldiers and the alumni troopers who served as far back as the Korean War was amazing.

“This is a very fast-paced unit. … The camaraderie is different. This is the type of stuff we need,” she said, adding that she would love to do something similar and more often in order to help foster a sense of pride for the unit within the newest troops who had never served with “Garryowen” before.

“The new privates who have just gotten here have got to experience this,” Trevino said. “Being able to see people who have so much experience in the military. … This is just so great.”

Lt. Gen. Paul Funk, III Corps and Fort Hood commander and a former “Garryowen” commander, even sent a video to the troopers from the Middle East, where he currently command Operation Inherent Resolve — the international coalition to defeat the Islamic State.

“I am even more proud I can hold my head high and say that I am a Garryowen trooper, just like you,” Funk said in the video. “All Garryowen troopers have one thing in common — tenacity, the single most important trait of a trooper. That fixed resolve not to quit when things get tough.”

Retired Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III, a former command sergeant major for the squadron and the 14th sergeant major of the Army, also offered some words of encouragement for all the troopers at the event, both past and present.

“My time in 1/7 Cav for me was the most pivotal and most memorable part of my military career,” he said. “A lot of people ask me, ‘do you miss the Army?’ Hell no, I do not. What I do miss is you. It’s that blood we shared over in Iraq and unfortunately the lives we lost and those who suffer from the visible wounds of war and those who suffer from invisible wounds.

“I just want to tell each and every one of you, thank you for helping to shape my life and for teaching me one of the most important things — that honor is the most important value,” Chandler added. “It’s what makes Garryowen, the 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, the pride of not only the 1st Cavalry Division, but as far as I’m concerned, the rest of the United States Army.”

Plans have already begun for the 2019 reunion, which will occur once the unit returns from an upcoming deployment to Europe with the 1st Brigade.

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Turkey: Military seizes control of Jandaris from Kurdish YPG

Turkish forces and allied Syrian rebels are now in control of Jandaris, a town in the Afrin district of northern Syria[1], the state-run Anadolu news agency says.

Turkey[2]‘s military alongside Free Syrian Army[3] allies have seized control of the second most populated town in the district from Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) fighters after capturing a hill overlooking the town a day earlier, it said on Thursday.

Jandaris is about 20km away from central Afrin, the last major YPG outpost.

“The entire city of Jandaris was liberated from the secessionist gangs. The fight will continue until the whole of Afrin is cleared of them,” an FSA commander who goes by the name of Abu Saleh said.

Turkey-backed FSA advances in Afrin offensive

Speaking in Vienna, Mevlut Cavusoglus, Turkey’s foreign minister, said the military operation in Syria against the Syrian Kurdish group should end by May.

Al Jazeera’s Allan Fisher, reporting from the Turkish-Syrian border, said fighting could still be under way in Jandaris.

“Despite the bravado, they may not have complete control yet. Sporadic fighting is reported to be continuing in the town,” he said.

“The battle for Afrin may not be as quick or straightforward. The Kurds are moving 1,700 fighters across the country away from the battle against ISIL [Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant] on to the front lines of the coming assault.”

Turkey has rejected international calls for it to suspend the Afrin assault in line with a UN ceasefire for Syria, which does not apply to ISIL, al-Qaeda and groups associated with it, or others deemed “terrorists” by the UN Security Council.

Turkey considers the YPG an extension of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), which launched a decades-old fight against Ankara’s rule.

YPG has been an important ally to the United States in the fight against ISIL.

A new flash point between Israel, Syria and Iran

Inside Story[4]

A new flash point between Israel, Syria and Iran

References

  1. ^ Syria (www.aljazeera.com)
  2. ^ Turkey (www.aljazeera.com)
  3. ^ Free Syrian Army (www.aljazeera.com)
  4. ^ Inside Story (www.aljazeera.com)
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Army equips first unit with inflatable satellite communications

The Army's Project Manager Tactical Network provided Transportable Tactical Command Communications new equipment training to the first unit equipped (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February and March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.
1 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Army’s Project Manager Tactical Network provided Transportable Tactical Command Communications new equipment training to the first unit equipped (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February and March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Amy Walker, PM Tactical NetworkPEO C3T Public Affairs ) VIEW ORIGINAL[1]
Note: Initial entry photo for illustration purposes only; Transportable Tactical Command Communications (T2C2) was not used during this event. The 1st Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, conduct airborne proficiency jump onto a drop zone at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, in December 2017.
2 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Note: Initial entry photo for illustration purposes only; Transportable Tactical Command Communications (T2C2) was not used during this event. The 1st Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, conduct airborne proficiency jump onto a drop zone at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, in December 2017. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) VIEW ORIGINAL[2]
Note: Initial entry photo for illustration purposes only; Transportable Tactical Command Communications (T2C2) was not used during this event. U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III, assigned to the 517th Airlift Squadron, drops a heavy equipment pallet over Malemute drop zone, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Nov. 22, 2016 (in the same way a T2C2 Heavy system would be deployed).
3 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Note: Initial entry photo for illustration purposes only; Transportable Tactical Command Communications (T2C2) was not used during this event. U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III, assigned to the 517th Airlift Squadron, drops a heavy equipment pallet over Malemute drop zone, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Nov. 22, 2016 (in the same way a T2C2 Heavy system would be deployed). (Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Alejandro Pena) VIEW ORIGINAL[3]
The Army's Project Manager Tactical Network provided Tactical Transportable Command Communications (T2C2) new equipment training to the first unit equipped with the capability (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February-March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. T2C2 is part of the Army's unified tactical network transport tool suite and enables uninterrupted mission command and secure reliable voice, video and data communications at every stage of the joint operational spectrum.
4 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Army’s Project Manager Tactical Network provided Tactical Transportable Command Communications (T2C2) new equipment training to the first unit equipped with the capability (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February-March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. T2C2 is part of the Army’s unified tactical network transport tool suite and enables uninterrupted mission command and secure reliable voice, video and data communications at every stage of the joint operational spectrum. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Amy Walker, PM Tactical NetworkPEO C3T Public Affairs ) VIEW ORIGINAL[4]
The Army's Project Manager Tactical Network provided Transportable Tactical Command Communications (T2C2) new equipment training to the first unit equipped (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February-March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Both T2C2 Lite (1.2 meter satellite terminal) seen here and T2C2 Heavy (2.4 meter satellite terminal) provide agile robust high-bandwidth network communications and mission command. Both variants are inflatable, providing units with a larger antenna, increasing capability and bandwidth efficiency in half the size of current solutions.
5 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Army’s Project Manager Tactical Network provided Transportable Tactical Command Communications (T2C2) new equipment training to the first unit equipped (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February-March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Both T2C2 Lite (1.2 meter satellite terminal) seen here and T2C2 Heavy (2.4 meter satellite terminal) provide agile robust high-bandwidth network communications and mission command. Both variants are inflatable, providing units with a larger antenna, increasing capability and bandwidth efficiency in half the size of current solutions. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Amy Walker, PM Tactical NetworkPEO C3T Public Affairs ) VIEW ORIGINAL[5]
The Army's Project Manager Tactical Network provided Tactical Transportable Command Communications (T2C2) new equipment training to the first unit equipped (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February-March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.
6 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Army’s Project Manager Tactical Network provided Tactical Transportable Command Communications (T2C2) new equipment training to the first unit equipped (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February-March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Amy Walker, PM Tactical NetworkPEO C3T Public Affairs ) VIEW ORIGINAL[6]
The Army's Project Manager Tactical Network provided Tactical Transportable Command Communications new equipment training to the first unit equipped with the capability (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February-March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.
7 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Army’s Project Manager Tactical Network provided Tactical Transportable Command Communications new equipment training to the first unit equipped with the capability (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February-March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Amy Walker, PM Tactical NetworkPEO C3T Public Affairs ) VIEW ORIGINAL[7]
The Army's Project Manager Tactical Network provided Tactical Transportable Command Communications (T2C2) new equipment training to the first unit equipped with the capability (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February-March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.
8 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Army’s Project Manager Tactical Network provided Tactical Transportable Command Communications (T2C2) new equipment training to the first unit equipped with the capability (the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division) in February-March 2018 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Amy Walker, PM Tactical NetworkPEO C3T Public Affairs ) VIEW ORIGINAL[8]

FORT BRAGG, N.C. — During initial entry missions, the Global Response Force is called to rapidly deploy and jump into potentially dangerous situations, and being armed with agile resilient network communications is critical to operational success.

In support of these and other tactical edge missions, the Army equipped its first unit — the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division — with the new inflatable satellite communications system known as Transportable Tactical Command Communications, or T2C2, to enable expeditionary mission command and situational awareness in the heart of evolving fights.

“We are the 82nd Airborne Division, the Army’s Global Response Force, and for us, expeditionary communications are essential,” said Maj. Nathan Spreitler, communications officer, or S6, for the 3rd Brigade Combat Team 82nd Airborne Division. “We have to go in light and we have to bring capability that is rapidly deployable, self-sustaining, and easy to set up, so we can have network connectivity and be operational in a matter of minutes, rather than hours or days like heavier units. I see T2C2 supporting our mission in that early entry capacity.”

When the Global Response Force first deploys, before boots even hit the ground, the Army’s Enroute Mission Command system, or EMC, provides the unit with an expeditionary command post capability in flight. This allows the unit to retain the same level of situational awareness and collaborative communications it has on the ground, during the long hours in the air.

Then once on the ground and an airfield is seized, Soldiers can rapidly set up their inflatable T2C2 satellite system, and retain continuity of mission command during the initial phase of the operation. Later in the mission, when follow-on forces fly in larger network assets, commanders can extend the battlespace using T2C2 to support company-size forward operating bases and special team-size elements that need an easily transportable network capability at the tactical edge.

“With T2C2, we have reach-back to our higher headquarters for sustainment, reporting, and to call for support when needed; the commander can receive intelligence updates and operational orders,” Spreitler said. “Any capability that gives us an edge, that gives us that communication piece before we typically would have it, improves our readiness to fight, because we have to be reactionary to a [peer or] near peer threat.”

As part of the fielding process, Product Manager Satellite Communications, assigned to Project Manager Tactical Network, together with the Communications-Electronics Command trainers, provided new equipment training in February and March at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. In March 2017, the Army conducted the T2C2 operational test at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska and was then granted approval to proceed to full rate production in January 2018. The 2nd BCT, 2nd Infantry Division, at Joint Base, Lewis-McChord, Washington, will be the next unit fielded with T2C2, with fielding expected to be complete in mid-April 2018.

On the current basis of issue, the Army will field over 800 T2C2 systems across the force. Project Manager Tactical Network has already fielded easy to deploy Global Rapid Response Information Package and SIPR/NIPR Access Point satellite terminals as bridging capabilities until T2C2 can be fully fielded.

“T2C2 is packed in easily transportable hard side transit cases or soft sided cases and can be rapidly setup or torn down,” said Lt. Col. Jenny Stacy, product manager for Satellite Communications, assigned to Project Manager Tactical Network, who procures T2C2 for the Army. “The expeditionary capabilities of T2C2 improves readiness, operational flexibility and increases a unit’s ability to quickly relocate, which in turn improves the survivability of units in a tactical fight.”

As part of the Army’s network modernization strategy, the T2C2 program of record is designed to enable the service to “fight tonight.” Both T2C2 Lite (1.2 meter satellite terminal) and T2C2 Heavy (2.4 meter satellite terminal) provide agile robust high-bandwidth network communications and mission command. Both variants are inflatable, providing units with a larger antenna, increasing capability and bandwidth efficiency in half the size of current solutions. These resilient SATCOM terminals can withstand extreme weather conditions and even air drops.

T2C2 enables uninterrupted mission command and secure reliable voice, video and data communications at every stage of the joint operational spectrum. Because of its significantly higher bandwidth compared to transport volume of satellite terminals of the same size, Soldiers in remote locations can leverage T2C2 to utilize mission command systems such as Command Post of the Future (CPOF), Joint Battle Command-Platform (JBC-P), Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System (AFATDS). T2C2 also enables communications systems such as whiteboard, chat, video and video teleconference, and Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) calls that require significant data throughput.

“Our mission as paratroopers is to jump in and secure a drop zone,” said Sgt. Dominic Steinel, 307th Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division. “It’s important for us to be able to drop in and directly support the infantry Soldiers first and set up our communication devices without having to land an [Air Force] C17 to bring in the larger network transport equipment. That is really the application, to have that network and voice access instantly, instead of having to land larger pieces of equipment.”

————————————————-
The U.S. Army Program Executive Office Command, Control and Communications-Tactical develops, acquires, fields and supports the Army’s mission command network to ensure force readiness. This critical Army modernization priority delivers tactical communications so commanders and Soldiers can stay connected and informed at all times, even in the most austere and hostile environments. PEO C3T is delivering the network to regions around the globe, enabling high-speed, high-capacity voice, data and video communications to a user base that includes the Army’s joint, coalition and other mission partners.

RELATED LINKS

References

  1. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  2. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  3. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  4. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  5. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  6. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  7. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
  8. ^ View Original (www.army.mil)
0

China's military spending

When assessing China’s military spending and modernization, we should keep six things in mind. First, China’s official military spending figures are questionable, with many independent estimates[1] suggesting that it already spends in excess of $200 billion on its military each year. Although the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has become somewhat more transparent over the past two decades, the exact annual defence budget should be taken with a grain of salt.

Two, until about 2020 the PLA will be undertaking[2] perhaps its most radical modernization drive[3] since 1949, shrinking the size of its ground forces by about 300,000, increasing the relative weight of its air force and navy, and improving joint theatre-level command and control structures. In short, the PLA is evolving into a modern, war-fighting, and offensive-oriented force.

Three, despite spending increases, China’s ability to import defence equipment and technology is still limited by export controls and arms embargoes. Russia and the former Soviet republics are the largest exporters to China over the past five years, with sensors, missiles, and aircraft among the equipment provided. However, the fact that China’s arms imports have steadily decreased[4] over the past 15 years points to its growing defence industrial capabilities, helped in part by reverse engineering[5]and technological theft[6].

Four, as recently as 2013, China spent more on internal security[7] than on defence (local security spending from 2014 onwards has not been fully divulged[8]). This includes funding for entities such as the Ministry of State Security (intelligence) and Ministry of Public Security (law and order), whose functions partly contribute to national defence. But equally, this indicates Beijing’s continuing concerns about its vulnerability to domestic unrest.

Five, despite its greater resources, the PLA of today has never fought a war. Gen. Zhang Youxia, Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission, is among the few remaining officers with battle experience (against Vietnam). This is in stark contrast to the United States, which has been battle-hardened (and fatigued) from almost constant warfare in the Gulf, Balkans, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Considering the rising[9] tide of[10] jingoism[11], the PLA’s inexperience suggests that it is an adolescent andpotentially[12] trigger-happy[13] force, one that is as likely to drag a country into conflict as it is to prevent one.

Six, rather paradoxically, the PLA remains a force of last resort—for now. The recent pattern of Chinese assertiveness – whether in the East China Sea or in the Himalayas – has often involved a three-tier approach. It is led by apparent civilians, such as armed fishing vessels[14]dredging ships[15], or road building crews, who are backed up by paramilitary or law enforcement forces such as coast guard vessels and border security. The PLA itself offers a large latent threat, but one that has (so far) barked[16] more than it has bitten[17]. In fact, information, psychological, and legal warfare[18] and economic coercion[19] remain at the pointy end of China’s spear.

What is without doubt is that China has the second-most potent military today after the United States, and this represents the degree to which Beijing has become a peer competitor to Washington as a global power. Its ability to play an offensive role in future conflicts has increased. This is obviously a concern for countries along China’s periphery, particularly those with which it has outstanding territorial disputes. These include Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia, Brunei, Bhutan, and India. China’s growing military profile also directly involves the United States, which is a resident power in the Western Pacific with alliance commitments to five countries. For all these actors, China’s increased military spending, capabilities, and assertiveness will require continued vigilance, confidence-building measures, and exhortations for greater transparency. At the same time, it will necessitate better defence preparedness, stronger alliances and partnerships to raise the potential costs of Chinese military adventurism, and if necessary the resolute and appropriate application of force.

References

  1. ^ independent estimates (chinapower.csis.org)
  2. ^ undertaking (www.rand.org)
  3. ^ modernization drive (ndupress.ndu.edu)
  4. ^ steadily decreased (armstrade.sipri.org)
  5. ^ reverse engineering (www.reuters.com)
  6. ^ technological theft (www.popularmechanics.com)
  7. ^ more on internal security (www.reuters.com)
  8. ^ been fully divulged (blogs.wsj.com)
  9. ^ rising (foreignpolicy.com)
  10. ^ tide of (edition.cnn.com)
  11. ^ jingoism (www.bbc.com)
  12. ^ potentially (www.newsweek.com)
  13. ^ trigger-happy (www.japantimes.co.jp)
  14. ^ armed fishing vessels (www.washingtonpost.com)
  15. ^ dredging ships (www.ft.com)
  16. ^ barked (www.scmp.com)
  17. ^ bitten (www.lowyinstitute.org)
  18. ^ information, psychological, and legal warfare (jamestown.org)
  19. ^ economic coercion (money.cnn.com)
0

China's military spending

When assessing China’s military spending and modernization, we should keep six things in mind. First, China’s official military spending figures are questionable, with many independent estimates[1] suggesting that it already spends in excess of $200 billion on its military each year. Although the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has become somewhat more transparent over the past two decades, the exact annual defence budget should be taken with a grain of salt.

Two, until about 2020 the PLA will be undertaking[2] perhaps its most radical modernization drive[3] since 1949, shrinking the size of its ground forces by about 300,000, increasing the relative weight of its air force and navy, and improving joint theatre-level command and control structures. In short, the PLA is evolving into a modern, war-fighting, and offensive-oriented force.

Three, despite spending increases, China’s ability to import defence equipment and technology is still limited by export controls and arms embargoes. Russia and the former Soviet republics are the largest exporters to China over the past five years, with sensors, missiles, and aircraft among the equipment provided. However, the fact that China’s arms imports have steadily decreased[4] over the past 15 years points to its growing defence industrial capabilities, helped in part by reverse engineering[5]and technological theft[6].

Four, as recently as 2013, China spent more on internal security[7] than on defence (local security spending from 2014 onwards has not been fully divulged[8]). This includes funding for entities such as the Ministry of State Security (intelligence) and Ministry of Public Security (law and order), whose functions partly contribute to national defence. But equally, this indicates Beijing’s continuing concerns about its vulnerability to domestic unrest.

Five, despite its greater resources, the PLA of today has never fought a war. Gen. Zhang Youxia, Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission, is among the few remaining officers with battle experience (against Vietnam). This is in stark contrast to the United States, which has been battle-hardened (and fatigued) from almost constant warfare in the Gulf, Balkans, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Considering the rising[9] tide of[10] jingoism[11], the PLA’s inexperience suggests that it is an adolescent andpotentially[12] trigger-happy[13] force, one that is as likely to drag a country into conflict as it is to prevent one.

Six, rather paradoxically, the PLA remains a force of last resort—for now. The recent pattern of Chinese assertiveness – whether in the East China Sea or in the Himalayas – has often involved a three-tier approach. It is led by apparent civilians, such as armed fishing vessels[14]dredging ships[15], or road building crews, who are backed up by paramilitary or law enforcement forces such as coast guard vessels and border security. The PLA itself offers a large latent threat, but one that has (so far) barked[16] more than it has bitten[17]. In fact, information, psychological, and legal warfare[18] and economic coercion[19] remain at the pointy end of China’s spear.

What is without doubt is that China has the second-most potent military today after the United States, and this represents the degree to which Beijing has become a peer competitor to Washington as a global power. Its ability to play an offensive role in future conflicts has increased. This is obviously a concern for countries along China’s periphery, particularly those with which it has outstanding territorial disputes. These include Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia, Brunei, Bhutan, and India. China’s growing military profile also directly involves the United States, which is a resident power in the Western Pacific with alliance commitments to five countries. For all these actors, China’s increased military spending, capabilities, and assertiveness will require continued vigilance, confidence-building measures, and exhortations for greater transparency. At the same time, it will necessitate better defence preparedness, stronger alliances and partnerships to raise the potential costs of Chinese military adventurism, and if necessary the resolute and appropriate application of force.

References

  1. ^ independent estimates (chinapower.csis.org)
  2. ^ undertaking (www.rand.org)
  3. ^ modernization drive (ndupress.ndu.edu)
  4. ^ steadily decreased (armstrade.sipri.org)
  5. ^ reverse engineering (www.reuters.com)
  6. ^ technological theft (www.popularmechanics.com)
  7. ^ more on internal security (www.reuters.com)
  8. ^ been fully divulged (blogs.wsj.com)
  9. ^ rising (foreignpolicy.com)
  10. ^ tide of (edition.cnn.com)
  11. ^ jingoism (www.bbc.com)
  12. ^ potentially (www.newsweek.com)
  13. ^ trigger-happy (www.japantimes.co.jp)
  14. ^ armed fishing vessels (www.washingtonpost.com)
  15. ^ dredging ships (www.ft.com)
  16. ^ barked (www.scmp.com)
  17. ^ bitten (www.lowyinstitute.org)
  18. ^ information, psychological, and legal warfare (jamestown.org)
  19. ^ economic coercion (money.cnn.com)