Tagged: battle

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China Shows Off Air Force in Direct Challenge to India Military Power in Asia

The Chinese military has published photos of recent air force drills that at least one expert quoted in ruling party media identified Tuesday as a direct message to neighboring India.

Tensions between the two Asian powers have once again risen after they threatened to come to blows[1] over a border dispute last summer. Officials have swapped provocative words in recent months, reigniting a potential crisis as rhetoric turned into military preparations. In the latest move, China’s armed forces, known as the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), published Friday rare images of Chengdu J-10 and Shenyang J-11 fighter jets landing in Tibet, the western region that borders India, after exercises that Chinese military expert and commentator Song Zhongping linked to recent escalations.

Related: Russia and China could soon become more powerful than the U.S., and Valentine’s Day is to blame[2]

Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now[3]

“Strengthening the 3.5-generation fighter jets or even stationing more advanced fighters in the Western Theater Command has been urgent for the PLA,” Song told Chinese Communist Party organ The Global Times[4] in an article then posted to the official China Military Online[5].

“With India importing new jets, China will continue strengthening its fighter jets in the Western Theater Command,” he added.

ChinaJ10Tibet

A Chengdu J-10 fighter jet attached to an aviation brigade of the air force under the People’s Liberation Army Western Theater Command taxies on the runway during an aerial combat training exercise in western China on February 13. Chen Qingshun/China Military Online

Song noted that such upgrades to China’s defenses have often been first implemented in its southern and eastern commands. The western command, however, has received more attention as the rivalry with India heated up.

China and India have long quarreled over stretches of territory along their shared border and this even exploded into a war between the two in the early 1960s. One region, known as Doklam or Donglang, which borders India’s Sikkim State, Chinese Tibet and the Ha Valley of the tiny kingdom of Bhutan, revived hostilities last summer[6]. India argued that Chinese construction near the trilateral border area last June threatened Bhutan’s claim to the region and deployed troops to confront the Chinese military in the area.

The standoff lasted nearly a month and a half and was believed to have resolved after both sides withdrew. Chinese President Xi Jinping was seen shaking hands with his Indian counterpart Nehru Modi on the sidelines of the September 2017 BRICS Summit in Xiamen, China. This detente, however, has been undermined by recent statements from both sides claiming they won last summer’s dispute and could take on the other in a future fight.

During a regular press[7] conference[8] Thursday, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang criticized a visit earlier that day by Modu to the nearby disputed Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, which China claimed as part of southern Tibet. Geng said China was “firmly opposed to the Indian leader’s visit to the disputed area” and would “lodge stern representations with the Indian side.”

ChinaSpringFestivalSoldiers

Soldiers assigned to a brigade of the People’s Liberation Army 78th Group Army conduct a combat readiness training exercise in full battle gear during the 2018 spring festival holiday, in northeastern China, on February 15. China and India have long quarreled over stretches of territory along their shared border. Liu Yishan/China Military Online

The Chinese military has also used recent remarks from Indian generals to justify its own urgent transformation into a force fully prepared to fight a war between states[9]. Xi’s ongoing, massive bid to revolutionize his armed forces had the dual purpose of modernizing China’s military power and streamlining it to make it capable of protecting not only Chinese borders but also Chinese interests abroad[10]. Xi has also sought tight ties with Pakistan[11], a crucial Chinese economic ally—and India’s longtime foe.

Following last week’s air force drills in Tibet, the Chinese military continued training through the week-long Chinese New Year, or spring festival, holiday. The Chinese navy and army were also pictured conducting maneuvers aimed toward realizing Xi’s goal of preparing his armed forces to handle any external threat.

References

  1. ^ threatened to come to blows (www.newsweek.com)
  2. ^ Russia and China could soon become more powerful than the U.S., and Valentine’s Day is to blame (www.newsweek.com)
  3. ^ Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now (subscription.newsweek.com)
  4. ^ The Global Times (www.globaltimes.cn)
  5. ^ China Military Online (english.chinamil.com.cn)
  6. ^ revived hostilities last summer (www.newsweek.com)
  7. ^ a regular press (www.fmprc.gov.cn)
  8. ^ conference (www.fmprc.gov.cn)
  9. ^ prepared to fight a war between states (www.newsweek.com)
  10. ^ Chinese interests abroad (www.newsweek.com)
  11. ^ tight ties with Pakistan (www.newsweek.com)
0

The Army is putting cyber, electronic warfare teams in its BCTs

Years of training led Army Cyber Command to develop expeditionary cyber-electromagnetic teams[1] that can be tailored to the needs of brigade commanders for specific missions and deployments.

The next step[2] is bringing that capability to the division- and corps-levels of the Army, officials said.

Over the past three years, since the Army launched the Cyber[3] Support to Corps and Below pilot in 2015, teams have conducted nine rotations at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, refining their Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Team structure.

Maj. Gen. John Morrison, commander of the Cyber Center of Excellence, told C4ISRNET last year that by creating such teams the Army[4] can “bring together and really start getting after the basic tenets of multi-domain battle in a fused, synchronized and integrated fashion, [which] is something the Army really has to start getting after.”

Work for the training center begins six months before troops get there, when leaders from the brigade combat team staff and CEMA teams meet, said Maj. Wayne Sanders, ARCYBER chief for the Support to the Corps program. The teams explain what capabilities they have, while BCT commanders evaluate their needs for both the training and a potential deployment cycle.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Then, the CEMA team creates a tailored component, keeping in mind the logistical demands of such teams with the rotational BCTs headed to training and/or overseas.

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The teams include soldiers to handle network operations, electronic warfare and both offensive and defensive cyber operations.

An integrated attachment that will add signal and space capabilities is expected to be piloted this year, Morrison told C4ISRNET.

The key is letting brigade commanders know what the teams can do so that they can plan effectively, Sanders said in a release.

“If you’re looking at this from a real-world perspective, if they identify that they are going somewhere in the world — somewhere they would need additional capacity that they may not have coverage for — they can submit that … as a request for forces,” Sanders said.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Learning how to scale the teams to the needs of the units has been one of the most important lessons learned over the past three years of experimentation.

“We’ve learned that we were a very large logistical burden to the rotational training units. We learned our lessons about the CEMA capability that we can provide to a rotational training unit, and, at the same time, we were reducing the logistical requirement to provide that capability,” said Sgt. Maj. Jesse Potter, the operations sergeant major for the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade.

The teams identify the soldiers they need to meet the brigade’s requirements and then equip them so they can be self-sufficient either in training or deployment, he said.

That reduces their footprint, giving commanders ways to choose between a “flyaway kit” with light capability, or a more sustained cyber-electromagnetic operational need, Potter said.

References

  1. ^ cyber-electromagnetic teams (www.c4isrnet.com)
  2. ^ next step (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Cyber (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ Army (www.armytimes.com)
  5. ^ Army offers direct commissions to boost cyber force (www.armytimes.com)
  6. ^ New leader named for Army cyber directorate (www.armytimes.com)
  7. ^ New in 2018: Army cyber expands training, gains EW soldiers (www.armytimes.com)
0

The Army is putting cyber, electronic warfare teams in its BCTs

Years of training led Army Cyber Command to develop expeditionary cyber-electromagnetic teams[1] that can be tailored to the needs of brigade commanders for specific missions and deployments.

The next step[2] is bringing that capability to the division- and corps-levels of the Army, officials said.

Over the past three years, since the Army launched the Cyber[3] Support to Corps and Below pilot in 2015, teams have conducted nine rotations at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, refining their Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Team structure.

Maj. Gen. John Morrison, commander of the Cyber Center of Excellence, told C4ISRNET last year that by creating such teams the Army[4] can “bring together and really start getting after the basic tenets of multi-domain battle in a fused, synchronized and integrated fashion, [which] is something the Army really has to start getting after.”

Work for the training center begins six months before troops get there, when leaders from the brigade combat team staff and CEMA teams meet, said Maj. Wayne Sanders, ARCYBER chief for the Support to the Corps program. The teams explain what capabilities they have, while BCT commanders evaluate their needs for both the training and a potential deployment cycle.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Then, the CEMA team creates a tailored component, keeping in mind the logistical demands of such teams with the rotational BCTs headed to training and/or overseas.

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Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
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The teams include soldiers to handle network operations, electronic warfare and both offensive and defensive cyber operations.

An integrated attachment that will add signal and space capabilities is expected to be piloted this year, Morrison told C4ISRNET.

The key is letting brigade commanders know what the teams can do so that they can plan effectively, Sanders said in a release.

“If you’re looking at this from a real-world perspective, if they identify that they are going somewhere in the world — somewhere they would need additional capacity that they may not have coverage for — they can submit that … as a request for forces,” Sanders said.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Learning how to scale the teams to the needs of the units has been one of the most important lessons learned over the past three years of experimentation.

“We’ve learned that we were a very large logistical burden to the rotational training units. We learned our lessons about the CEMA capability that we can provide to a rotational training unit, and, at the same time, we were reducing the logistical requirement to provide that capability,” said Sgt. Maj. Jesse Potter, the operations sergeant major for the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade.

The teams identify the soldiers they need to meet the brigade’s requirements and then equip them so they can be self-sufficient either in training or deployment, he said.

That reduces their footprint, giving commanders ways to choose between a “flyaway kit” with light capability, or a more sustained cyber-electromagnetic operational need, Potter said.

References

  1. ^ cyber-electromagnetic teams (www.c4isrnet.com)
  2. ^ next step (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Cyber (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ Army (www.armytimes.com)
  5. ^ Army offers direct commissions to boost cyber force (www.armytimes.com)
  6. ^ New leader named for Army cyber directorate (www.armytimes.com)
  7. ^ New in 2018: Army cyber expands training, gains EW soldiers (www.armytimes.com)
0

The Army is putting cyber, electronic warfare teams in its BCTs

Years of training led Army Cyber Command to develop expeditionary cyber-electromagnetic teams[1] that can be tailored to the needs of brigade commanders for specific missions and deployments.

The next step[2] is bringing that capability to the division- and corps-levels of the Army, officials said.

Over the past three years, since the Army launched the Cyber[3] Support to Corps and Below pilot in 2015, teams have conducted nine rotations at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, refining their Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Team structure.

Maj. Gen. John Morrison, commander of the Cyber Center of Excellence, told C4ISRNET last year that by creating such teams the Army[4] can “bring together and really start getting after the basic tenets of multi-domain battle in a fused, synchronized and integrated fashion, [which] is something the Army really has to start getting after.”

Work for the training center begins six months before troops get there, when leaders from the brigade combat team staff and CEMA teams meet, said Maj. Wayne Sanders, ARCYBER chief for the Support to the Corps program. The teams explain what capabilities they have, while BCT commanders evaluate their needs for both the training and a potential deployment cycle.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Then, the CEMA team creates a tailored component, keeping in mind the logistical demands of such teams with the rotational BCTs headed to training and/or overseas.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
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The teams include soldiers to handle network operations, electronic warfare and both offensive and defensive cyber operations.

An integrated attachment that will add signal and space capabilities is expected to be piloted this year, Morrison told C4ISRNET.

The key is letting brigade commanders know what the teams can do so that they can plan effectively, Sanders said in a release.

“If you’re looking at this from a real-world perspective, if they identify that they are going somewhere in the world — somewhere they would need additional capacity that they may not have coverage for — they can submit that … as a request for forces,” Sanders said.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Learning how to scale the teams to the needs of the units has been one of the most important lessons learned over the past three years of experimentation.

“We’ve learned that we were a very large logistical burden to the rotational training units. We learned our lessons about the CEMA capability that we can provide to a rotational training unit, and, at the same time, we were reducing the logistical requirement to provide that capability,” said Sgt. Maj. Jesse Potter, the operations sergeant major for the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade.

The teams identify the soldiers they need to meet the brigade’s requirements and then equip them so they can be self-sufficient either in training or deployment, he said.

That reduces their footprint, giving commanders ways to choose between a “flyaway kit” with light capability, or a more sustained cyber-electromagnetic operational need, Potter said.

References

  1. ^ cyber-electromagnetic teams (www.c4isrnet.com)
  2. ^ next step (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Cyber (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ Army (www.armytimes.com)
  5. ^ Army offers direct commissions to boost cyber force (www.armytimes.com)
  6. ^ New leader named for Army cyber directorate (www.armytimes.com)
  7. ^ New in 2018: Army cyber expands training, gains EW soldiers (www.armytimes.com)
0

The Army is putting cyber, electronic warfare teams in its BCTs

Years of training led Army Cyber Command to develop expeditionary cyber-electromagnetic teams[1] that can be tailored to the needs of brigade commanders for specific missions and deployments.

The next step[2] is bringing that capability to the division- and corps-levels of the Army, officials said.

Over the past three years, since the Army launched the Cyber[3] Support to Corps and Below pilot in 2015, teams have conducted nine rotations at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, refining their Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Team structure.

Maj. Gen. John Morrison, commander of the Cyber Center of Excellence, told C4ISRNET last year that by creating such teams the Army[4] can “bring together and really start getting after the basic tenets of multi-domain battle in a fused, synchronized and integrated fashion, [which] is something the Army really has to start getting after.”

Work for the training center begins six months before troops get there, when leaders from the brigade combat team staff and CEMA teams meet, said Maj. Wayne Sanders, ARCYBER chief for the Support to the Corps program. The teams explain what capabilities they have, while BCT commanders evaluate their needs for both the training and a potential deployment cycle.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Then, the CEMA team creates a tailored component, keeping in mind the logistical demands of such teams with the rotational BCTs headed to training and/or overseas.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The teams include soldiers to handle network operations, electronic warfare and both offensive and defensive cyber operations.

An integrated attachment that will add signal and space capabilities is expected to be piloted this year, Morrison told C4ISRNET.

The key is letting brigade commanders know what the teams can do so that they can plan effectively, Sanders said in a release.

“If you’re looking at this from a real-world perspective, if they identify that they are going somewhere in the world — somewhere they would need additional capacity that they may not have coverage for — they can submit that … as a request for forces,” Sanders said.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Learning how to scale the teams to the needs of the units has been one of the most important lessons learned over the past three years of experimentation.

“We’ve learned that we were a very large logistical burden to the rotational training units. We learned our lessons about the CEMA capability that we can provide to a rotational training unit, and, at the same time, we were reducing the logistical requirement to provide that capability,” said Sgt. Maj. Jesse Potter, the operations sergeant major for the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade.

The teams identify the soldiers they need to meet the brigade’s requirements and then equip them so they can be self-sufficient either in training or deployment, he said.

That reduces their footprint, giving commanders ways to choose between a “flyaway kit” with light capability, or a more sustained cyber-electromagnetic operational need, Potter said.

References

  1. ^ cyber-electromagnetic teams (www.c4isrnet.com)
  2. ^ next step (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Cyber (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ Army (www.armytimes.com)
  5. ^ Army offers direct commissions to boost cyber force (www.armytimes.com)
  6. ^ New leader named for Army cyber directorate (www.armytimes.com)
  7. ^ New in 2018: Army cyber expands training, gains EW soldiers (www.armytimes.com)
0

The Army is putting cyber, electronic warfare teams in its BCTs

Years of training led Army Cyber Command to develop expeditionary cyber-electromagnetic teams[1] that can be tailored to the needs of brigade commanders for specific missions and deployments.

The next step[2] is bringing that capability to the division- and corps-levels of the Army, officials said.

Over the past three years, since the Army launched the Cyber[3] Support to Corps and Below pilot in 2015, teams have conducted nine rotations at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, refining their Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Team structure.

Maj. Gen. John Morrison, commander of the Cyber Center of Excellence, told C4ISRNET last year that by creating such teams the Army[4] can “bring together and really start getting after the basic tenets of multi-domain battle in a fused, synchronized and integrated fashion, [which] is something the Army really has to start getting after.”

Work for the training center begins six months before troops get there, when leaders from the brigade combat team staff and CEMA teams meet, said Maj. Wayne Sanders, ARCYBER chief for the Support to the Corps program. The teams explain what capabilities they have, while BCT commanders evaluate their needs for both the training and a potential deployment cycle.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Then, the CEMA team creates a tailored component, keeping in mind the logistical demands of such teams with the rotational BCTs headed to training and/or overseas.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The teams include soldiers to handle network operations, electronic warfare and both offensive and defensive cyber operations.

An integrated attachment that will add signal and space capabilities is expected to be piloted this year, Morrison told C4ISRNET.

The key is letting brigade commanders know what the teams can do so that they can plan effectively, Sanders said in a release.

“If you’re looking at this from a real-world perspective, if they identify that they are going somewhere in the world — somewhere they would need additional capacity that they may not have coverage for — they can submit that … as a request for forces,” Sanders said.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Learning how to scale the teams to the needs of the units has been one of the most important lessons learned over the past three years of experimentation.

“We’ve learned that we were a very large logistical burden to the rotational training units. We learned our lessons about the CEMA capability that we can provide to a rotational training unit, and, at the same time, we were reducing the logistical requirement to provide that capability,” said Sgt. Maj. Jesse Potter, the operations sergeant major for the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade.

The teams identify the soldiers they need to meet the brigade’s requirements and then equip them so they can be self-sufficient either in training or deployment, he said.

That reduces their footprint, giving commanders ways to choose between a “flyaway kit” with light capability, or a more sustained cyber-electromagnetic operational need, Potter said.

References

  1. ^ cyber-electromagnetic teams (www.c4isrnet.com)
  2. ^ next step (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Cyber (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ Army (www.armytimes.com)
  5. ^ Army offers direct commissions to boost cyber force (www.armytimes.com)
  6. ^ New leader named for Army cyber directorate (www.armytimes.com)
  7. ^ New in 2018: Army cyber expands training, gains EW soldiers (www.armytimes.com)
0

The Army is putting cyber, electronic warfare teams in its BCTs

Years of training led Army Cyber Command to develop expeditionary cyber-electromagnetic teams[1] that can be tailored to the needs of brigade commanders for specific missions and deployments.

The next step[2] is bringing that capability to the division- and corps-levels of the Army, officials said.

Over the past three years, since the Army launched the Cyber[3] Support to Corps and Below pilot in 2015, teams have conducted nine rotations at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, refining their Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Team structure.

Maj. Gen. John Morrison, commander of the Cyber Center of Excellence, told C4ISRNET last year that by creating such teams the Army[4] can “bring together and really start getting after the basic tenets of multi-domain battle in a fused, synchronized and integrated fashion, [which] is something the Army really has to start getting after.”

Work for the training center begins six months before troops get there, when leaders from the brigade combat team staff and CEMA teams meet, said Maj. Wayne Sanders, ARCYBER chief for the Support to the Corps program. The teams explain what capabilities they have, while BCT commanders evaluate their needs for both the training and a potential deployment cycle.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Then, the CEMA team creates a tailored component, keeping in mind the logistical demands of such teams with the rotational BCTs headed to training and/or overseas.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The teams include soldiers to handle network operations, electronic warfare and both offensive and defensive cyber operations.

An integrated attachment that will add signal and space capabilities is expected to be piloted this year, Morrison told C4ISRNET.

The key is letting brigade commanders know what the teams can do so that they can plan effectively, Sanders said in a release.

“If you’re looking at this from a real-world perspective, if they identify that they are going somewhere in the world — somewhere they would need additional capacity that they may not have coverage for — they can submit that … as a request for forces,” Sanders said.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Learning how to scale the teams to the needs of the units has been one of the most important lessons learned over the past three years of experimentation.

“We’ve learned that we were a very large logistical burden to the rotational training units. We learned our lessons about the CEMA capability that we can provide to a rotational training unit, and, at the same time, we were reducing the logistical requirement to provide that capability,” said Sgt. Maj. Jesse Potter, the operations sergeant major for the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade.

The teams identify the soldiers they need to meet the brigade’s requirements and then equip them so they can be self-sufficient either in training or deployment, he said.

That reduces their footprint, giving commanders ways to choose between a “flyaway kit” with light capability, or a more sustained cyber-electromagnetic operational need, Potter said.

References

  1. ^ cyber-electromagnetic teams (www.c4isrnet.com)
  2. ^ next step (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Cyber (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ Army (www.armytimes.com)
  5. ^ Army offers direct commissions to boost cyber force (www.armytimes.com)
  6. ^ New leader named for Army cyber directorate (www.armytimes.com)
  7. ^ New in 2018: Army cyber expands training, gains EW soldiers (www.armytimes.com)
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The Army is putting cyber, electronic warfare teams in its BCTs

Years of training led Army Cyber Command to develop expeditionary cyber-electromagnetic teams[1] that can be tailored to the needs of brigade commanders for specific missions and deployments.

The next step[2] is bringing that capability to the division- and corps-levels of the Army, officials said.

Over the past three years, since the Army launched the Cyber[3] Support to Corps and Below pilot in 2015, teams have conducted nine rotations at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, refining their Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Team structure.

Maj. Gen. John Morrison, commander of the Cyber Center of Excellence, told C4ISRNET last year that by creating such teams the Army[4] can “bring together and really start getting after the basic tenets of multi-domain battle in a fused, synchronized and integrated fashion, [which] is something the Army really has to start getting after.”

Work for the training center begins six months before troops get there, when leaders from the brigade combat team staff and CEMA teams meet, said Maj. Wayne Sanders, ARCYBER chief for the Support to the Corps program. The teams explain what capabilities they have, while BCT commanders evaluate their needs for both the training and a potential deployment cycle.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Then, the CEMA team creates a tailored component, keeping in mind the logistical demands of such teams with the rotational BCTs headed to training and/or overseas.

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The teams include soldiers to handle network operations, electronic warfare and both offensive and defensive cyber operations.

An integrated attachment that will add signal and space capabilities is expected to be piloted this year, Morrison told C4ISRNET.

The key is letting brigade commanders know what the teams can do so that they can plan effectively, Sanders said in a release.

“If you’re looking at this from a real-world perspective, if they identify that they are going somewhere in the world — somewhere they would need additional capacity that they may not have coverage for — they can submit that … as a request for forces,” Sanders said.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Learning how to scale the teams to the needs of the units has been one of the most important lessons learned over the past three years of experimentation.

“We’ve learned that we were a very large logistical burden to the rotational training units. We learned our lessons about the CEMA capability that we can provide to a rotational training unit, and, at the same time, we were reducing the logistical requirement to provide that capability,” said Sgt. Maj. Jesse Potter, the operations sergeant major for the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade.

The teams identify the soldiers they need to meet the brigade’s requirements and then equip them so they can be self-sufficient either in training or deployment, he said.

That reduces their footprint, giving commanders ways to choose between a “flyaway kit” with light capability, or a more sustained cyber-electromagnetic operational need, Potter said.

References

  1. ^ cyber-electromagnetic teams (www.c4isrnet.com)
  2. ^ next step (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Cyber (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ Army (www.armytimes.com)
  5. ^ Army offers direct commissions to boost cyber force (www.armytimes.com)
  6. ^ New leader named for Army cyber directorate (www.armytimes.com)
  7. ^ New in 2018: Army cyber expands training, gains EW soldiers (www.armytimes.com)
0

The Army is putting cyber, electronic warfare teams in its BCTs

Years of training led Army Cyber Command to develop expeditionary cyber-electromagnetic teams[1] that can be tailored to the needs of brigade commanders for specific missions and deployments.

The next step[2] is bringing that capability to the division- and corps-levels of the Army, officials said.

Over the past three years, since the Army launched the Cyber[3] Support to Corps and Below pilot in 2015, teams have conducted nine rotations at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, refining their Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Team structure.

Maj. Gen. John Morrison, commander of the Cyber Center of Excellence, told C4ISRNET last year that by creating such teams the Army[4] can “bring together and really start getting after the basic tenets of multi-domain battle in a fused, synchronized and integrated fashion, [which] is something the Army really has to start getting after.”

Work for the training center begins six months before troops get there, when leaders from the brigade combat team staff and CEMA teams meet, said Maj. Wayne Sanders, ARCYBER chief for the Support to the Corps program. The teams explain what capabilities they have, while BCT commanders evaluate their needs for both the training and a potential deployment cycle.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Then, the CEMA team creates a tailored component, keeping in mind the logistical demands of such teams with the rotational BCTs headed to training and/or overseas.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The teams include soldiers to handle network operations, electronic warfare and both offensive and defensive cyber operations.

An integrated attachment that will add signal and space capabilities is expected to be piloted this year, Morrison told C4ISRNET.

The key is letting brigade commanders know what the teams can do so that they can plan effectively, Sanders said in a release.

“If you’re looking at this from a real-world perspective, if they identify that they are going somewhere in the world — somewhere they would need additional capacity that they may not have coverage for — they can submit that … as a request for forces,” Sanders said.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Learning how to scale the teams to the needs of the units has been one of the most important lessons learned over the past three years of experimentation.

“We’ve learned that we were a very large logistical burden to the rotational training units. We learned our lessons about the CEMA capability that we can provide to a rotational training unit, and, at the same time, we were reducing the logistical requirement to provide that capability,” said Sgt. Maj. Jesse Potter, the operations sergeant major for the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade.

The teams identify the soldiers they need to meet the brigade’s requirements and then equip them so they can be self-sufficient either in training or deployment, he said.

That reduces their footprint, giving commanders ways to choose between a “flyaway kit” with light capability, or a more sustained cyber-electromagnetic operational need, Potter said.

References

  1. ^ cyber-electromagnetic teams (www.c4isrnet.com)
  2. ^ next step (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Cyber (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ Army (www.armytimes.com)
  5. ^ Army offers direct commissions to boost cyber force (www.armytimes.com)
  6. ^ New leader named for Army cyber directorate (www.armytimes.com)
  7. ^ New in 2018: Army cyber expands training, gains EW soldiers (www.armytimes.com)
0

The Army is putting cyber, electronic warfare teams in its BCTs

Years of training led Army Cyber Command to develop expeditionary cyber-electromagnetic teams[1] that can be tailored to the needs of brigade commanders for specific missions and deployments.

The next step[2] is bringing that capability to the division- and corps-levels of the Army, officials said.

Over the past three years, since the Army launched the Cyber[3] Support to Corps and Below pilot in 2015, teams have conducted nine rotations at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, refining their Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Team structure.

Maj. Gen. John Morrison, commander of the Cyber Center of Excellence, told C4ISRNET last year that by creating such teams the Army[4] can “bring together and really start getting after the basic tenets of multi-domain battle in a fused, synchronized and integrated fashion, [which] is something the Army really has to start getting after.”

Work for the training center begins six months before troops get there, when leaders from the brigade combat team staff and CEMA teams meet, said Maj. Wayne Sanders, ARCYBER chief for the Support to the Corps program. The teams explain what capabilities they have, while BCT commanders evaluate their needs for both the training and a potential deployment cycle.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Then, the CEMA team creates a tailored component, keeping in mind the logistical demands of such teams with the rotational BCTs headed to training and/or overseas.

Sign up for the Army Times Daily News Roundup
Don’t miss the top Army stories, delivered each afternoon
Thanks for signing up!

The teams include soldiers to handle network operations, electronic warfare and both offensive and defensive cyber operations.

An integrated attachment that will add signal and space capabilities is expected to be piloted this year, Morrison told C4ISRNET.

The key is letting brigade commanders know what the teams can do so that they can plan effectively, Sanders said in a release.

“If you’re looking at this from a real-world perspective, if they identify that they are going somewhere in the world — somewhere they would need additional capacity that they may not have coverage for — they can submit that … as a request for forces,” Sanders said.

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Soldiers with Cyber-Electromagnetic Activities Teams provide support to Brigade Combat Team commanders at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. This tailored asset has been built to meet commander needs both in training and on deployment. (Steve Stover/Army)

Learning how to scale the teams to the needs of the units has been one of the most important lessons learned over the past three years of experimentation.

“We’ve learned that we were a very large logistical burden to the rotational training units. We learned our lessons about the CEMA capability that we can provide to a rotational training unit, and, at the same time, we were reducing the logistical requirement to provide that capability,” said Sgt. Maj. Jesse Potter, the operations sergeant major for the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade.

The teams identify the soldiers they need to meet the brigade’s requirements and then equip them so they can be self-sufficient either in training or deployment, he said.

That reduces their footprint, giving commanders ways to choose between a “flyaway kit” with light capability, or a more sustained cyber-electromagnetic operational need, Potter said.

References

  1. ^ cyber-electromagnetic teams (www.c4isrnet.com)
  2. ^ next step (www.armytimes.com)
  3. ^ Cyber (www.armytimes.com)
  4. ^ Army (www.armytimes.com)
  5. ^ Army offers direct commissions to boost cyber force (www.armytimes.com)
  6. ^ New leader named for Army cyber directorate (www.armytimes.com)
  7. ^ New in 2018: Army cyber expands training, gains EW soldiers (www.armytimes.com)