Tagged: area

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$500000 found during traffic stop, Homeland Security investigating

YORK COUNTY – Nearly half a million dollars smeared with yellow mustard was discovered during a traffic stop in York County, leading to a Homeland Security investigation.

The York County Sheriff’s Office said a deputy pulled over an eastbound vehicle near Mile Marker 348 on Feb. 18.

The deputy felt something was suspicious during the stop, and asked the driver to search the car. Permission was granted, and a suitcase full of wrapped money smeared with yellow mustard was discovered. The total currency found is estimated at $490,000.

After seizing the money, a K9 indicated the cash had a strong odor of drugs.

The York County Sheriff’s Office said the case is now being investigated by Homeland Security, and the money was most likely headed to the Chicago area.

The suspect’s name is not being released.

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China Shows Off Air Force in Direct Challenge to India Military Power in Asia

The Chinese military has published photos of recent air force drills that at least one expert quoted in ruling party media identified Tuesday as a direct message to neighboring India.

Tensions between the two Asian powers have once again risen after they threatened to come to blows[1] over a border dispute last summer. Officials have swapped provocative words in recent months, reigniting a potential crisis as rhetoric turned into military preparations. In the latest move, China’s armed forces, known as the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), published Friday rare images of Chengdu J-10 and Shenyang J-11 fighter jets landing in Tibet, the western region that borders India, after exercises that Chinese military expert and commentator Song Zhongping linked to recent escalations.

Related: Russia and China could soon become more powerful than the U.S., and Valentine’s Day is to blame[2]

Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now[3]

“Strengthening the 3.5-generation fighter jets or even stationing more advanced fighters in the Western Theater Command has been urgent for the PLA,” Song told Chinese Communist Party organ The Global Times[4] in an article then posted to the official China Military Online[5].

“With India importing new jets, China will continue strengthening its fighter jets in the Western Theater Command,” he added.

ChinaJ10Tibet

A Chengdu J-10 fighter jet attached to an aviation brigade of the air force under the People’s Liberation Army Western Theater Command taxies on the runway during an aerial combat training exercise in western China on February 13. Chen Qingshun/China Military Online

Song noted that such upgrades to China’s defenses have often been first implemented in its southern and eastern commands. The western command, however, has received more attention as the rivalry with India heated up.

China and India have long quarreled over stretches of territory along their shared border and this even exploded into a war between the two in the early 1960s. One region, known as Doklam or Donglang, which borders India’s Sikkim State, Chinese Tibet and the Ha Valley of the tiny kingdom of Bhutan, revived hostilities last summer[6]. India argued that Chinese construction near the trilateral border area last June threatened Bhutan’s claim to the region and deployed troops to confront the Chinese military in the area.

The standoff lasted nearly a month and a half and was believed to have resolved after both sides withdrew. Chinese President Xi Jinping was seen shaking hands with his Indian counterpart Nehru Modi on the sidelines of the September 2017 BRICS Summit in Xiamen, China. This detente, however, has been undermined by recent statements from both sides claiming they won last summer’s dispute and could take on the other in a future fight.

During a regular press[7] conference[8] Thursday, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang criticized a visit earlier that day by Modu to the nearby disputed Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, which China claimed as part of southern Tibet. Geng said China was “firmly opposed to the Indian leader’s visit to the disputed area” and would “lodge stern representations with the Indian side.”

ChinaSpringFestivalSoldiers

Soldiers assigned to a brigade of the People’s Liberation Army 78th Group Army conduct a combat readiness training exercise in full battle gear during the 2018 spring festival holiday, in northeastern China, on February 15. China and India have long quarreled over stretches of territory along their shared border. Liu Yishan/China Military Online

The Chinese military has also used recent remarks from Indian generals to justify its own urgent transformation into a force fully prepared to fight a war between states[9]. Xi’s ongoing, massive bid to revolutionize his armed forces had the dual purpose of modernizing China’s military power and streamlining it to make it capable of protecting not only Chinese borders but also Chinese interests abroad[10]. Xi has also sought tight ties with Pakistan[11], a crucial Chinese economic ally—and India’s longtime foe.

Following last week’s air force drills in Tibet, the Chinese military continued training through the week-long Chinese New Year, or spring festival, holiday. The Chinese navy and army were also pictured conducting maneuvers aimed toward realizing Xi’s goal of preparing his armed forces to handle any external threat.

References

  1. ^ threatened to come to blows (www.newsweek.com)
  2. ^ Russia and China could soon become more powerful than the U.S., and Valentine’s Day is to blame (www.newsweek.com)
  3. ^ Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now (subscription.newsweek.com)
  4. ^ The Global Times (www.globaltimes.cn)
  5. ^ China Military Online (english.chinamil.com.cn)
  6. ^ revived hostilities last summer (www.newsweek.com)
  7. ^ a regular press (www.fmprc.gov.cn)
  8. ^ conference (www.fmprc.gov.cn)
  9. ^ prepared to fight a war between states (www.newsweek.com)
  10. ^ Chinese interests abroad (www.newsweek.com)
  11. ^ tight ties with Pakistan (www.newsweek.com)
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Brazil's Military Takeover Of Security In Rio De Janeiro Is A Looming Disaster

SÃO PAULO ― Brazilian President Michel Temer made the unprecedented decision Friday to give the country’s military all public security responsibilities in Rio de Janeiro, the beleaguered city that has been plagued by rising rates of violent crime since it hosted the Olympic Games nearly two years ago.

Temer’s decision will put the military in near-total control of security in Rio through the end of the year, marking the first time a Brazilian president has mobilized the armed forces to take over a city or state’s public security efforts since the country’s military dictatorship ended in 1985.

The announcement has sent shockwaves across country, where the prospect of any sort of military intervention is already an unsettling topic[1] for many, and yet Temer argued in an official statement and again on television Friday that it was the only possible maneuver still available in a desperate time for both Rio and Brazil.

After nearly a decade of declining crime rates, Rio has seen a dramatic spike in violent crimes and homicides in the past two years[2]. In 2016, the Rio state was home to more than 5,000 homicides, including nearly 1,000 killings committed by police.

Though it is far from Brazil’s most violent area, the second-largest but most prominent city in the country has become a barometer for the nation as a whole, which saw its number of homicides increase nearly 4 percent, to roughly 62,000, in 2016. (By comparison, in 2016, there were around 17,000 homicides in the United States, which has roughly 100 million more people than Brazil.)[3]

There were another 688 shootings in Rio in January, but it is no coincidence that Temer made the announcement last week, at the close of Carnival. As the annual pre-Lent festival ended, videos of tourists being beaten and robbed on Rio’s streets and beaches circulated online and on Brazilian cable news, driving home the perception that violence in the city had spiraled out of control.[4]

There is no doubt that Rio and Brazil in general are in dire need of a policy shift  to address the outbreaks of violence.

But there is little reason for optimism that Temer’s plan to send in the big guns of the Brazilian military will work, and the concerns around his decision are plentiful and obvious. Most notably, allowing the military to take control of Rio for up to 10 months raises pertinent questions about the health of Brazil’s democracy some three decades after the end of the country’s military dictatorship: Since his announcement, there has been open worry in Rio and across Brazil that Temer’s military intervention could be a test run for more aggressive military involvement in policing and public security in the future.

And Temer’s escalation in policing is happening in a state with one of the deadliest police forces in a country with one of the world’s deadliest police forces. It’s folly, human rights groups and security experts say, to think the move will do anything but add to the bloodshed and put the lives and rights of Rio’s poorest and most vulnerable residents at even greater risk.

“It is the equivalent of a public-policy ‘Hail Mary,’ and the results are far from certain,” said Dr. Robert Muggah, a co-founder of the Igarapé Institute, a Rio-based public security think tank. “There is a real danger of militarizing public security in Rio de Janeiro even further.”

In 2016, Brazil law enforcement killed more than 4,200 people. Rio’s police, meanwhile, are among the deadliest even by the country’s standards. Police there killed 925 people in 2016, a 43 percent increase from the year prior, and an amount roughly equal to the number of people killed by police in the U.S. in the same year, even though the American population is nearly 20 times larger than the Rio state’s. The number of people killed by police in Rio likely topped 1,000 for 2017.[5]

The violence has taken a toll on police officers, too. In 2016, more than 400 officers died on duty across Brazil, and police deaths rose 34 percent, to 132, in Rio state. But the vast majority of the victims of violent crime and homicide in Rio and across Brazil ― both by police and otherwise ― are not Carnival-going tourists or middle-class people, but the poor and mostly black residents of favelas, the informal, impoverished neighborhoods that have suffered decades of government neglect and are often controlled by drug gangs. Black Brazilians are 23.5 percent more likely to die in homicides than members of other racial groups, and more than three-quarters of the victims of police killings in 2016 were black.[6][7]

Sending in a military that has little training in urban policing and virtually no time to plan for the complexities of Rio and its favela neighborhoods may only exacerbate those problems, human rights groups warn.

“The decision of the federal government to intervene in the state of Rio de Janeiro´s public security … reinforces mistakes that have already been made in the past,” Jurema Werneck, the executive director of Amnesty International Brazil, said in a statement. “Rio de Janeiro state has already experienced actions of the Army, none of which have reduced homicides and aggravated human rights violations. The possible 10 months [of] federal intervention puts at risk mainly the lives of those living in the favelas and peripheries, [especially] black youth.”

The military has indeed proven unable to bring such areas under police control in previous, less-sweeping interventions.

In June 2015, the Brazilian army ended a 14-month occupation of the Complexo da Maré ― a sprawling favela network that is home to an estimated 140,000 people ― having done almost nothing to root out the drug gang that controls it or to curb the violence that plagues the daily lives of its residents. And last year, the military helped Rio police lock down Rocinha ― the largest of Brazil’s favelas ― after a sustained period of shootouts between police and rival drug gangs. The army left two weeks later with Rocinha still ringing with gunfire.[8][9]

That has led to widespread opposition from favela residents and organizations that work within the neighborhoods. Over the weekend, they started an opposition campaign on social media that branded the intervention “a farce.”[10][11]

“In our history, we’ve had one soldier for every 55 inhabitants, but we never had a doctor or a teacher for every 55 inhabitants,” said Gizele Martins, a journalist and community activist in the Maré favela. “We suffer with war tanks at our doorstep. Imagine having your house being searched everyday. [We have] many cases where people get murdered.”

“Now Rio is suffering again with military intervention,” Martins added. “So we that live in the favelas and the peripheries of Rio are completely opposed [to military intervention], because we suffer more than everybody.”

The way to curb the violence, human rights groups and favela residents argue, is not further military intervention, but comprehensive policies that would provide resources like education, health care, infrastructure and economic opportunities that the neighborhoods have long lacked.

“The public security crisis is structural,” Werneck, of Amnesty International, said. “Its not by increasing the number of weapons, militarization nor the continuation of the ‘war on drugs’ that we’ll overcome it.”

Jean Wyllys, a Rio congressman from the leftist Socialism and Freedom Party, echoed that sentiment on Twitter[12].

“The attack on public safety problems goes far beyond a police organ,” Wyllys said. “It goes through urban policies, the reaffirmation of citizenship of the most vulnerable populations, change in drug policy, improvement in public education and the end of underemployment.”

Political leaders in both Rio and Brazil, though, have had little interest in such efforts. The last major initiative aimed at reducing crime in the favelas ― a program called “pacification,” originally launched in 2008 ― collapsed shortly after the Olympics thanks to budgetary shortfalls. Once intended to deliver major social programs and reforms to the favelas, the primary legacy of pacification[13] was instead widespread police corruption, an increase in violence and homicides (including those committed by police), and the further stigmatization of favela residents as little more than poor criminals.

And since he assumed office after the impeachment of former President Dilma Rousseff in 2016, Temer has pushed austerity policies that have cut health, education and welfare programs that once helped many of Brazil’s poorest residents escape poverty. Rio state Gov. Luiz Fernando Pezão and Rio Mayor Marcelo Crivella, meanwhile, “have shown little interest or appetite in developing and implementing a serious public security agenda” amid the outbreaks in violence, Muggah said.

And so Rio gets what it got on Friday, a decision based not in responsible or meaningful public policy, but in politics.

Putting the army in charge may win some votes in the short term. But the potential long-term consequences are exceedingly dangerous.
Dr. Robert Muggah, co-founder of the Igarapé Institute.

Temer has spent the last year pushing an unpopular overhaul of Brazil’s public pension system, and some have speculated[14] that he is using the military intervention as a political smokescreen to distract attention from that legislation while he plots a path forward on how to pass it.

Meanwhile, polls have shown that violence and public security are among the chief concerns of voters heading into general elections later this year, when Brazilians will choose Temer’s successor. Temer won’t be a candidate for president, but with approval ratings that have languished in the single digits for more than a year, the intervention is an opportunity to show that he and the parties within his governing coalition are willing to adopt the tough-on-crime stance many Brazilians say they want.

But Temer’s plan also carries substantial risk, even beyond the most immediate human rights concerns, by creating a political vacuum for those advocating for even more aggressive methods. Rio congressman Jair Bolsonaro, for instance, has emerged as a popular presidential candidate on a platform of giving Brazilian police more leeway to shoot and kill criminals. Bolsonaro, a former army parachutist who has previously praised Brazil’s military dictatorship, blasted Temer’s intervention plan, suggesting that the military likewise won’t have enough latitude to conduct the sort of all-out war he believes the country needs to wage.

“Everyone says we’re at war. Rio is at war. But what kind of war can only one side fire?” Bolsonaro asked in an interview with a Brazilian web site, suggesting again that the police and military need more impunity to shoot and kill.[15]

Polling in recent years has also shown increasing support for the idea of returning to military rule — a 2015 poll showed that 47.6 percent of Brazilians saw a military intervention as justifiable under certain circumstances of major governmental corruption, and support for democracy is among the lowest in the region — and Bolsonaro’s star continues to rise in pre-election surveys, largely on the back of his public security platform. So if Temer’s plan fails to reduce the violence, as it most likely will, the continued lack of a true strategy could further exacerbate the problem and the risk to the lives and human rights of poor, black Brazilians like those that populate Rio’s most dangerous areas. [16][17]

“Putting the army in charge may win some votes in the short term,” Muggah said. “But the potential long-term consequences are exceedingly dangerous.”

References

  1. ^ already an unsettling topic (www.newyorker.com)
  2. ^ dramatic spike in violent crimes and homicides in the past two years (www.forumseguranca.org.br)
  3. ^ to roughly 62,000 (www.huffingtonpost.com)
  4. ^ another 688 shootings (gulfnews.com)
  5. ^ Police there killed 925 people in 2016 (www.huffingtonpost.com)
  6. ^ 23.5 percent more likely (www.telesurtv.net)
  7. ^ more than three-quarters (www.huffingtonpost.com)
  8. ^ 14-month occupation of the Complexo da Maré (edition.cnn.com)
  9. ^ the military helped Rio police lock down Rocinha (www.theguardian.com)
  10. ^ opposition campaign on social media (twitter.com)
  11. ^ a farce (twitter.com)
  12. ^ echoed that sentiment on Twitter (twitter.com)
  13. ^ the primary legacy of pacification (www.huffingtonpost.com)
  14. ^ some have speculated (www.nytimes.com)
  15. ^ asked in an interview with a Brazilian web site (www.oantagonista.com)
  16. ^ 2015 poll (www.businessinsider.com)
  17. ^ among the lowest in the region (gobernanza.udg.mx)
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Florida shooting: West Point admits murdered hero

A reserves trainee who died helping other students escape a Florida school shooting has been posthumously accepted to a prestigious US military school.

Peter Wang, 15, who was one of 17 killed in the 14 February attack, was admitted to the class of 2025 at his dream school, West Point Academy.

He was a member of the US Army Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC), a school programme for potential US military officers.

His funeral took place on Tuesday.

The school will confer a letter of admission and honorarium tokens to his family, local West Point alumni Chad Maxey told the Sun Sentinel newspaper.

Florida Governor Rick Scott also reportedly directed the state’s National Guard to honour Peter and two other members of the JROTC at their funerals.

The US Army bestowed the Medal of Heroism to three students who were killed, including Peter, according to US media.

The Cadet Command approved Junior ROTC Heroism Medals for cadets Alaina Petty, Peter Wang and Martin Duque, an army spokesman told Fox News.

Peter was in uniform when he was fatally shot while holding the door for others fleeing a gunman at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, witnesses say.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

The recognition comes after an online petition called for him to be laid to rest with military honours, saying he “deserves” to be buried as a hero, because “his selfless and heroic actions have led to the survival of dozens in the area”.

Peter, who had spent part of his childhood in his parents’ native China, had dreamed of attending the West Point military academy, friends say.

Jesse Pan, a neighbour and longstanding friend of Peter’s family, told the BBC Chinese Service he had tried to support the teenager’s parents as they struggled to cope with the loss.

“I was there with his parents, helping translating and finding a funeral home,” he said.

“His parents fainted as soon as they saw his body. He had got multiple shots in front… So horrible.”

Meanwhile, about 100 students from Stoneman Douglas are travelling by bus to the Florida state capitol, where they plan to hold a rally against gun violence on Wednesday.

Their school was the scene of a deadly rampage last week, when an ex-student confessed to opening fire with an AR-15 assault rifle which he had purchased legally despite several mental health warnings.

The Stoneman Douglas students, who are out of school until it is due to reopen on 27 February, are hoping their march inspires others across the US.

A larger protest is being planned for Washington DC on 24 March.

In the wake of the shooting, a city leader in Dallas has asked the National Rifle Association (NRA) to move their annual convention.

“It is a tough call when you ask the NRA to reconsider coming to Dallas,” said Mayor Pro Tem Dwaine Caraway, according to local media[1].

The mayor cited past shootings in the Texas city, including the assassination of President John F Kennedy and the murder of five police officers in 2016.

Nikolas Cruz had moved in with a friend, who also attended the school, after his adoptive mother died in 2017.

The parents who hosted Mr Cruz, James and Kimberly Snead, told CBS News the teenager was depressed but they did not realise how troubled he was.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

“The Nik we knew was not the Nik that everybody else seemed to know,” James Snead told CBS.

“He pulled one over on us. As well as a lot of people,” Mrs Snead said.

Mr Snead, a US army veteran, said he knew Mr Cruz had guns but believed he had the only key to the safe where they were located. He added that it was Mr Cruz’s right to have guns.

Law enforcement officials say that Mr Cruz had legally purchased seven rifles in the last year, despite several mental health warnings.

The couple also told ABC News that Mr Cruz had texted their son only three minutes before the attack began in Parkland, Florida to say he was “going to the movies”.

When they first saw him at the police station after he was arrested, he “mumbled” an apology to the parents.

Documents obtained by CBS show that Mr Cruz and his late adoptive mother, Lynda Cruz, had been visited by Florida’s Department of Children and Families (DCF) after allegations of medical neglect in September 2016.

The investigator reportedly determined that Mr Cruz suffered from depression, ADHD and autism, cut his arms in a post on social media[2] and once plastered a racist message on his school backpack.

Officials closed the investigation after deciding that he was not being mistreated, according to CBS News.

Mr Cruz told child service investigators that “he plans to go out and buy a gun”, according to a DCF report.

References

  1. ^ according to local media (abc13.com)
  2. ^ cut his arms in a post on social media (www.cbsnews.com)
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Peter Wang: Online petition for full military burial for JROTC student who 'died a hero'

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Video: Parkland Strong | 4:33

Thousands gathered at Pine Trails Park on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 for a candlelight vigil in honor of the 17 victims of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Nicole Raucheisen/Naples Daily News

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Video: #NeverAgain Student Movement | 0:40

Jaclyn Corin, 17, a junior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, speaks about the student trip she organized with 100 of her fellow classmates to meet with lawmakers in Tallahassee on Tuesday and why it’s so important to the #NeverAgain movement.

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Video: Fort Lauderdale Gun Control Rally | 3:38

In the wake of the Parkland school shooting, hundreds of students, elected officials, gun control advocates and community members gather for a gun control rally in front of the federal courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018.

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Annika Dean | 1:02

Annika Dean survived the Fort Lauderdale airport shooting last year. This year her son survived the shooting at Douglas High School in Parkland.

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Video: Trump visits Fla. after school shooting | 1:00

President Donald Trump’s motorcade just left the Broward Sheriff’s Office Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, in Fort Lauderdale. Trump is in Florida to meet with families of victims in the mass school shooting. Patrick Riley/Naples Daily News

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Students protest gun violence after mass school shooting | 0:26

A group of South Broward High School students skipped school on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018 to protest against gun violence. Dorothy Edwards/Naples Daily News

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Florida school shooting: Candlelight vigil | 0:22

Candles were lit on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in honor of the 17 lives lost at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in a mass shooting on Wednesday. Dorothy Edwards/Naples Daily News

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Florida school shooting: Vigil and rememberances | 0:17

Moments before a candlelight vigil in Parkland, Florida, on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018, to honor the 17 lives in during a mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Dorothy Edwards/Naples Daily News

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Florida school shooting: Rick Scott gives briefing | 4:15

Gov. Rick Scott gives a briefing from Broward Health North following the school shooting in Parkland. Dorothy Edwards/Naples Daily News

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Doctors at Broward Health Medical Center on school shooting | 3:48

Dr. Benny Menendez, chief of emergency medicine for Broward Health Medical Center, and Dr. Louis Yogel, chief of staff for Broward Health Medical Center, speak about the mass school shooting. Patrick Riley/Naples Daily News

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Video: Doctor from Broward Health gives update on school shooting | 9:11

A doctor from Broward Health gave an update on the school shooting Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. Dorothy Edwards/Naples Daily News

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Video: Parkland Soccer Club grieves over teammate Alyssa Alhadeff | 3:48

The coach and teammates of mass shooting victim Alyssa Alhadeff remember the fallen leader of the Parkland Soccer Club team. Andrew West/The News-Press

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Video: Father of five speaks about school shooting | 3:34

Kenny Rodriguez’s sons were in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School when shooting started. Both made it out safe. Andrew West/The News-Press

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Mother who lost daughter to gun violence in Ohio speaks about loss | 1:51

Lisa McCrary-Tokes lost her daughter to gun violence a year ago in Ohio. She spoke Friday, Feb. 16, 2018 about the feeling of loss in Parkland, Florida following a mass shooting at a high school. Andrew West/The News-Press

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Florida high school mass shooting: Moments from the vigil in Parkland | 1:21

Thousands attended a candlelight vigil on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018, in honor of those slain and injured in mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Andrew West/The News-Press

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Broward doctor talks about treating Florida high school mass shooting victims | 7:20

Dr. Christopher Roberts, Chief Neurosurgeon for the Broward Health Medical Center had also treated patients from the Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooting in 2017. Andrew West/The News-Press

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VIDEOS: FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING Florida School Shooting: Florida Gov. Rick Scott meets with media after visiting victims | 2:11

Scott meets with shooting victims at Fort Lauderdale hospital.

[1][2]

PARKLAND – Peter Wang died in his Junior ROTC uniform while helping fellow students get to safety as shots rang out inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Valentine’s Day.

The Parkland community wants the 15-year-old to have a burial fit for a military hero.

An online petition filed Feb.16 on whitehouse.gov[3] calls for Congress to allow for Peter to have a full honors military funeral.

The online petition states: “Peter Wang, 15, was one of the students killed in Florida this past week. He was a JROTC Cadet who was last seen, in uniform, holding doors open and thus allowing other students, teachers, and staff to flee to safety. Wang was killed in the process. His selfless and heroic actions have led to the survival of dozens in the area.

Wang died a hero, and deserves to be treated as such, and deserves a full honors military burial.”

The petition needs 100,000 signatures by March 18 to get a response from the White House, according to the website. By Sunday evening, 17,491 people signed the petition. 

More: Numerous missed opportunities before Florida shooter killed 17 at Broward high school[4]

More: Florida school shooting: Hundreds rally for stricter gun laws after massacre[5]

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[6][7]

Wang’s funeral will be Tuesday, Feb. 20, at 1 p.m. at Kraeer Funeral Home, 1655 University Drive in Coral Springs. He will be laid to rest at Bailey Memorial Gardens in North Lauderdale.

See the petition at https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/allow-cadet-peter-wang-receive-full-honors-military-burial[8].

More: Florida school shooting: Judge orders social service records for Nikolas Cruz released[9]

More: Florida school shooting: Lauderdale airport attack survivor grateful son was safe in Parkland[10]

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Several of the Florida high school shooting survivors say they will not go back to school until Congress takes action by passing new gun legislation. Buzz60

 

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Petition demands military funeral for hero JROTC cadet

A petition to the White House is demanding military honors at the funeral of a “hero” JROTC cadet killed during the Florida school shooting[1] Wednesday.

The petition, which has garnered more than 20,000 signatures[2] Monday, asks for a “full honors” military burial for Peter Wang, who reportedly died helping others escape lunatic gunman Nikolas Cruz[3].

“He was a Jrotc Cadet who was last seen, in uniform, holding doors open and thus allowing other students, teachers, and staff to flee to safety,” the petition, started by someone named C.K., states.

“His selfless and heroic actions have led to the survival of dozens in the area. Wang died a hero, and deserves to be treated as such, and deserves a full honors military burial.”

Such burials are normally reserved for active-duty members, those in the Selected Reserve, or veterans not dishonorably discharged, according to the Department of Defense.

The honors include the playing of “Taps,” a folding ceremony for the American flag draped over a veteran’s casket, and the flag’s presentation to family members, according to the defense department.

The JROTC is an Army program that trains potential officers, and Wang hoped to attend the US Military Academy at West Point.

The Army, which administers the ROTC, did not respond to a request for comment.

The petition was filed on the White House’s We The People platform, where the Executive Office is supposed to respond to all petitions that gain more than 100,000 signatures in 30 days.

The Trump administration has not responded to any petitions filed to the Obama-era website, including ones garnering nearly a half-million names, according to a Washington Post report[4].

Wang’s funeral is set for Tuesday afternoon in Coral Springs, Florida.

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References

  1. ^ killed during the Florida school shooting (nypost.com)
  2. ^ garnered more than 20,000 signatures (petitions.whitehouse.gov)
  3. ^ lunatic gunman Nikolas Cruz (nypost.com)
  4. ^ according to a Washington Post report (www.washingtonpost.com)
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Peter Wang: Online petition for full military burial for JROTC student who 'died a hero'

Show Thumbnails
Show Captions

[1][2]

PARKLAND – Peter Wang died in his Junior ROTC uniform while helping fellow students get to safety as shots rang out inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Valentine’s Day.

The Parkland community wants the 15-year-old to have a burial fit for a military hero.

An online petition filed Feb.16 on whitehouse.gov[3] calls for Congress to allow for Peter to have a full honors military funeral.

The online petition states: “Peter Wang, 15, was one of the students killed in Florida this past week. He was a JROTC Cadet who was last seen, in uniform, holding doors open and thus allowing other students, teachers, and staff to flee to safety. Wang was killed in the process. His selfless and heroic actions have led to the survival of dozens in the area.

Wang died a hero, and deserves to be treated as such, and deserves a full honors military burial.”

The petition needs 100,000 signatures by March 18 to get a response from the White House, according to the website. By Sunday evening, 17,491 people signed the petition. 

Wang’s funeral will be Tuesday, Feb. 20, at 1 p.m. at Kraeer Funeral Home, 1655 University Drive in Coral Springs. He will be laid to rest at Bailey Memorial Gardens in North Lauderdale.

See the petition at https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/allow-cadet-peter-wang-receive-full-honors-military-burial[4].

More: Numerous missed opportunities before Florida shooter killed 17 at Broward high school[5]

More: Florida school shooting: Hundreds rally for stricter gun laws after massacre[6]

More: Florida school shooting: Lauderdale airport attack survivor grateful son was safe in Parkland[7]

CLOSE

Several of the Florida high school shooting survivors say they will not go back to school until Congress takes action by passing new gun legislation. Buzz60

 

Read or Share this story: https://www.naplesnews.com/story/news/crime/2018/02/18/peter-wang-online-petition-died-hero-helping-students-stoneman-douglas-asks-military-funeral/349973002/
0

Petition seeks full honors military funeral for hero Florida JROTC student

The Parkland community is petitioning the government to give a full honors military funeral to the slain 15-year-old junior Cadet student who helped students flee danger during the Florida school shooting last week.

Peter Wang died in his junior ROTC uniform helping students, teachers and staff escape from the shooting rampage at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Seventeen students and teachers died.

Lin Chen, Wang’s cousin, told The Sun-Sentinel[1] that she was not surprised to learn of his actions.

“He is so brave. He is the person who is genuinely kind to everyone,” she told the publication. “He doesn’t care about popularity. He always liked to cheer people up. He is like the big brother everyone wished they had.”

Jesse Pan, a neighbor, told the paper that Wang was “very polite, smart” and hoped one day to attend West Point military academy to be of “service to our country.”

An online petition[2] started on Friday urges Congress to honor Wang a burial fit for a military hero. 

Peter Wang uniform FB

Peter Wang dressed in a JROTC uniform.  (Facebook)

“Peter Wang, 15, was one of the students killed in Florida this past week. He was a JROTC Cadet who was last seen, in uniform, holding doors open and thus allowing other students, teachers, and staff to flee to safety,” the petition states. “Wang was killed in the process. His selfless and heroic actions have led to the survival of dozens in the area. Wang died a hero, and deserves to be treated as such, and deserves a full honors military burial.”

JROTC does not provide[3] basic training so it does not count as “being in the military.” Wang’s funeral would require intervention from the government.

The petition so far attracted nearly 20,000 signatures by Monday morning. It needs to gather 100,000 signatures by March 18 to get a response from the White House.

Lukas Mikelionis is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @LukasMikelionis[4].

References

  1. ^ The Sun-Sentinel (www.sun-sentinel.com)
  2. ^ An online petition (petitions.whitehouse.gov)
  3. ^ not provide (web.archive.org)
  4. ^ @LukasMikelionis (twitter.com)
0

Bigger, faster, stronger: China's ever-evolving military tech

Just ahead of the week-long Lunar New Year holiday, Chinese president Xi Jinping visited a satellite launch site[1] in the southwest Sichuan province, where he cheered the modernization and technological advances of China’s military. The setting was appropriate: Beidou 3 satellites were about to be sent into orbit, part of an effort to boost the satellite navigation system used by the People’s Liberation Army (PLA)—one goal being the ability to strike enemy targets with millimeter-level accuracy.

China’s military upgrade goes beyond space-based navigation. Last May, Quartz highlighted notable advances[2] like stealth fighter jets, high-tech reconnaissance ships, and long-range air-to-air missiles. The world’s largest operational amphibious aircraft, the AG600, had recently completed a taxiing test. (Update: It completed a successful maiden flight[3] in December.)

China's domestically developed AG600, the world's largest amphibious aircraft, is seen during its maiden flight in Zhuhai, Guangdong province, China December 24, 2017.
The AG600 swoops in. (Reuters/Stringer)

Many PLA projects, including the AG600, are designed to help China assert itself as an emerging maritime power. That’s especially the case in the contested South China Sea, where China has been fortifying remote outposts[4] with military facilities including missile shelters, sensor arrays, and radar systems. The country is also building a testing facility in the sea for unmanned vehicles. Located near the coastal city of Zhuhai, it’s slated to become the biggest of its kind in the world[5].

Meanwhile China has been diving deep into scientific research. It recently gathered 120 experts in the fields of artificial intelligence and quantum computing to form a top research institute focused on military applications, state media reported last month[6]. One area of interest is the use of AI to assist the decision-making[7] of commanders of nuclear submarines.

The PLA also wants to use quantum computers, vastly more powerful than today’s machines, to help it crack encrypted enemy codes and track targets now invisible from space, such as stealth bombers taking off at night. The technology could also lead to completely secure methods of communication, which is one reason China has been experimenting with a quantum satellite launched into space in August 2016[8]. By 2020, China plans to open[9] quantum research supercenter, with military applications very much in mind.

China’s progress in military technology hasn’t gone unnoticed. On Feb. 14, admiral Harry Harris, head of US Pacific Command, warned lawmakers[10] that “China’s impressive military buildup could soon challenge the United States across almost every domain.” He mentioned Beijing’s investments in the AI and hypersonic missiles (see more below). If the US does not keep pace, he added, it “will struggle to compete with the People’s Liberation Army on future battlefields.”

Here are the latest examples of Chinese military technology that have caught attention:

Aircraft carrier complement

Last year China celebrated its first homegrown aircraft carrier[11]. It’s now working on a second one that will include an electromagnetic catapult[12] for launching fighter jets—a big improvement over the current ski-jump design. But to be effective, carriers need the support of surveillance aircraft to detect threats and help manage aerial operations. With that in mind, China is developing the Shaanxi KJ-600[13], its first carrier-borne early-warning plane. Likely to be compatible with the electromagnetic catapult, it will pack active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, meaning it can spot enemy aircraft at long range,[14] and, at some angles, even stealth fighter jets like the hugely expensive F-35s the US deployed to Japan[15] last year. Of course, China already has various shipborne and land-based radars, along with less-advanced[16] surveillance planes. Still, the development of the KJ-600 shows Beijing is thinking about distant sea operations—and the need for truly combat-ready carrier groups.

Electromagnetic railgun

China’s interest in electromagnetic technology goes beyond catapults[17]. Late last month, images surfaced of what appeared to be an electromagnetic railgun installed on the bow of a Chinese warship docked in a Hubei province shipyard, as reported by the Drive[18]. Though the PLA stayed mum, a consensus soon emerged[19] among military observers that the system was in all likelihood such a railgun. If true, China is the first nation to install such a weapon on a ship. The US Navy has tested experimental railguns[20] from land, with projectiles reaching speeds of[21] up to 7,800 km/h (4,847 mph), with a range of about 185 km (115 miles). The idea behind such guns is to use powerful magnetic fields[22] to sling projectiles much faster and farther than existing systems can. Because they don’t require propelling charges, the relatively cheap projectiles can be stored in greater quantity in the same amount of space, making the system ideal for both sea control and amphibious operations. Given China’s vast maritime claims—and the historic threat of a possible invasion of Taiwan—it’s easy to see why the technology would appeal to Beijing’s military planners.

Hypersonic missiles

Hypersonic missiles are considered so disruptive that some experts want treaties in place to prevent their proliferation[23]. China, naturally, is busy working on its own (as are Russia and the US). As reported by the Diplomat[24], in November China tested the DF-17, which combines a ballistic missile with a hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV). The Diplomat’s source described it as “the first HGV test in the world using a system intended to be fielded operationally.” HGVs stop short of entering space[25], then skip back down to Earth at hypersonic speeds. By not reentering the atmosphere from a much higher apogee, they pose challenges for the early-warning satellites and missile-defense systems that watch for such things. What’s more, they’re nimble and can disguise their true targets until the final seconds. The medium-range DF-17 could be operational by 2020[26], and observers expect it will be capable of delivering both nuclear and conventional warheads. Improved versions of the technology will likely follow from the PLA.

Deep-sea reconnaissance

Given its maritime ambitions, China needs to detect enemy movements not just in the air, but also in the sea. To do that effectively, it needs to collect deep-sea data. The South China Morning Post reported in January that China has launched an underwater surveillance network—including buoys, surface vessels, satellites, and underwater gliders—designed to do just that. It gathers information about the underwater environment, such as water temperature and salinity—factors that affect the speed and direction of sound waves. Since submarines use sonar to track and target enemy vessels, that matters to the military. With such a system, China can monitor the waters in the South China Sea and elsewhere with greater precision—which could give other nations’ submarines pause before entering China-claimed areas. In January, China’s state-run media insisted the underwater research is for scientific research only—but then, Beijing once insisted that its construction at Mischief Reef in the South China Sea was for a fishermen’s shelter, while it is now clearly a military base.[27][28][29]

Drone swarms

China is also working on using swarms of small drones as a new method of attack. The idea is that such drones would respond in unison to commands yet avoid hitting one another. In December the country’s National University of Defense Technology conducted a test[30] involving a few dozen tiny unmanned aircraft used for a simulated reconnaissance mission. Future experiments could involve hundreds of drones, and the potential uses of the swarms are numerous. Carrying electronic warfare jammers, they could be used to confuse and overwhelm an enemy’s defenses before a more complex operation. Or they could simply be flown into the intakes of fighter jets to disable them. More uses for drone swarms will likely emerge in the future.

Evolving exoskeletons

This month, Norinco—a state-owned maker of armored vehicles—introduced a second-generation exoskeleton[31] designed for China’s infantry. Wearing the battery-powered body brace, a soldier can carry around about 100 lbs (45 kg) of weapons, ammo, and supplies. Compared to an earlier version introduced in 2015, this upgrade has a better battery, a streamlined harness, and stronger hydraulic and pneumatic actuators. It’s also lighter, which further improves battery performance. Future versions could include body armor. Meanwhile, the China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation has been showing off its own exoskeleton to naval military leaders: Supporting China’s maritime ambitions, after all, will entail loading plenty of cargo onto ships and planes.

References

  1. ^ visited a satellite launch site (www.xinhuanet.com)
  2. ^ highlighted notable advances (qz.com)
  3. ^ successful maiden flight (newatlas.com)
  4. ^ fortifying remote outposts (www.theguardian.com)
  5. ^ biggest of its kind in the world (www.scmp.com)
  6. ^ reported last month (www.scmp.com)
  7. ^ assist the decision-making (www.scmp.com)
  8. ^ in August 2016 (www.theguardian.com)
  9. ^ plans to open (www.popsci.com)
  10. ^ warned lawmakers (www.channelnewsasia.com)
  11. ^ first homegrown aircraft carrier (www.scmp.com)
  12. ^ electromagnetic catapult (www.scmp.com)
  13. ^ developing the Shaanxi KJ-600 (www.scmp.com)
  14. ^ at long range, (www.popsci.com)
  15. ^ deployed to Japan (edition.cnn.com)
  16. ^ less-advanced (www.defensenews.com)
  17. ^ goes beyond catapults (www.popsci.com)
  18. ^ reported by the Drive (www.thedrive.com)
  19. ^ soon emerged (www.thedrive.com)
  20. ^ tested experimental railguns (www.thedrive.com)
  21. ^ reaching speeds of (news.usni.org)
  22. ^ use powerful magnetic fields (www.popsci.com)
  23. ^ prevent their proliferation (www.rand.org)
  24. ^ reported by the Diplomat (thediplomat.com)
  25. ^ stop short of entering space (www.popularmechanics.com)
  26. ^ operational by 2020 (www.scmp.com)
  27. ^ reported in January (www.scmp.com)
  28. ^ scientific research only (www.ecns.cn)
  29. ^ clearly a military base. (qz.com)
  30. ^ conducted a test (www.thedrive.com)
  31. ^ second-generation exoskeleton (www.popsci.com)
0

Bigger, faster, stronger: China's ever-evolving military tech

Just ahead of the week-long Lunar New Year holiday, Chinese president Xi Jinping visited a satellite launch site[1] in the southwest Sichuan province, where he cheered the modernization and technological advances of China’s military. The setting was appropriate: Beidou 3 satellites were about to be sent into orbit, part of an effort to boost the satellite navigation system used by the People’s Liberation Army (PLA)—one goal being the ability to strike enemy targets with millimeter-level accuracy.

China’s military upgrade goes beyond space-based navigation. Last May, Quartz highlighted notable advances[2] like stealth fighter jets, high-tech reconnaissance ships, and long-range air-to-air missiles. The world’s largest operational amphibious aircraft, the AG600, had recently completed a taxiing test. (Update: It completed a successful maiden flight[3] in December.)

China's domestically developed AG600, the world's largest amphibious aircraft, is seen during its maiden flight in Zhuhai, Guangdong province, China December 24, 2017.
The AG600 swoops in. (Reuters/Stringer)

Many PLA projects, including the AG600, are designed to help China assert itself as an emerging maritime power. That’s especially the case in the contested South China Sea, where China has been fortifying remote outposts[4] with military facilities including missile shelters, sensor arrays, and radar systems. The country is also building a testing facility in the sea for unmanned vehicles. Located near the coastal city of Zhuhai, it’s slated to become the biggest of its kind in the world[5].

Meanwhile China has been diving deep into scientific research. It recently gathered 120 experts in the fields of artificial intelligence and quantum computing to form a top research institute focused on military applications, state media reported last month[6]. One area of interest is the use of AI to assist the decision-making[7] of commanders of nuclear submarines.

The PLA also wants to use quantum computers, vastly more powerful than today’s machines, to help it crack encrypted enemy codes and track targets now invisible from space, such as stealth bombers taking off at night. The technology could also lead to completely secure methods of communication, which is one reason China has been experimenting with a quantum satellite launched into space in August 2016[8]. By 2020, China plans to open[9] quantum research supercenter, with military applications very much in mind.

China’s progress in military technology hasn’t gone unnoticed. On Feb. 14, admiral Harry Harris, head of US Pacific Command, warned lawmakers[10] that “China’s impressive military buildup could soon challenge the United States across almost every domain.” He mentioned Beijing’s investments in the AI and hypersonic missiles (see more below). If the US does not keep pace, he added, it “will struggle to compete with the People’s Liberation Army on future battlefields.”

Here are the latest examples of Chinese military technology that have caught attention:

Aircraft carrier complement

Last year China celebrated its first homegrown aircraft carrier[11]. It’s now working on a second one that will include an electromagnetic catapult[12] for launching fighter jets—a big improvement over the current ski-jump design. But to be effective, carriers need the support of surveillance aircraft to detect threats and help manage aerial operations. With that in mind, China is developing the Shaanxi KJ-600[13], its first carrier-borne early-warning plane. Likely to be compatible with the electromagnetic catapult, it will pack active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, meaning it can spot enemy aircraft at long range,[14] and, at some angles, even stealth fighter jets like the hugely expensive F-35s the US deployed to Japan[15] last year. Of course, China already has various shipborne and land-based radars, along with less-advanced[16] surveillance planes. Still, the development of the KJ-600 shows Beijing is thinking about distant sea operations—and the need for truly combat-ready carrier groups.

Electromagnetic railgun

China’s interest in electromagnetic technology goes beyond catapults[17]. Late last month, images surfaced of what appeared to be an electromagnetic railgun installed on the bow of a Chinese warship docked in a Hubei province shipyard, as reported by the Drive[18]. Though the PLA stayed mum, a consensus soon emerged[19] among military observers that the system was in all likelihood such a railgun. If true, China is the first nation to install such a weapon on a ship. The US Navy has tested experimental railguns[20] from land, with projectiles reaching speeds of[21] up to 7,800 km/h (4,847 mph), with a range of about 185 km (115 miles). The idea behind such guns is to use powerful magnetic fields[22] to sling projectiles much faster and farther than existing systems can. Because they don’t require propelling charges, the relatively cheap projectiles can be stored in greater quantity in the same amount of space, making the system ideal for both sea control and amphibious operations. Given China’s vast maritime claims—and the historic threat of a possible invasion of Taiwan—it’s easy to see why the technology would appeal to Beijing’s military planners.

Hypersonic missiles

Hypersonic missiles are considered so disruptive that some experts want treaties in place to prevent their proliferation[23]. China, naturally, is busy working on its own (as are Russia and the US). As reported by the Diplomat[24], in November China tested the DF-17, which combines a ballistic missile with a hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV). The Diplomat’s source described it as “the first HGV test in the world using a system intended to be fielded operationally.” HGVs stop short of entering space[25], then skip back down to Earth at hypersonic speeds. By not reentering the atmosphere from a much higher apogee, they pose challenges for the early-warning satellites and missile-defense systems that watch for such things. What’s more, they’re nimble and can disguise their true targets until the final seconds. The medium-range DF-17 could be operational by 2020[26], and observers expect it will be capable of delivering both nuclear and conventional warheads. Improved versions of the technology will likely follow from the PLA.

Deep-sea reconnaissance

Given its maritime ambitions, China needs to detect enemy movements not just in the air, but also in the sea. To do that effectively, it needs to collect deep-sea data. The South China Morning Post reported in January that China has launched an underwater surveillance network—including buoys, surface vessels, satellites, and underwater gliders—designed to do just that. It gathers information about the underwater environment, such as water temperature and salinity—factors that affect the speed and direction of sound waves. Since submarines use sonar to track and target enemy vessels, that matters to the military. With such a system, China can monitor the waters in the South China Sea and elsewhere with greater precision—which could give other nations’ submarines pause before entering China-claimed areas. In January, China’s state-run media insisted the underwater research is for scientific research only—but then, Beijing once insisted that its construction at Mischief Reef in the South China Sea was for a fishermen’s shelter, while it is now clearly a military base.[27][28][29]

Drone swarms

China is also working on using swarms of small drones as a new method of attack. The idea is that such drones would respond in unison to commands yet avoid hitting one another. In December the country’s National University of Defense Technology conducted a test[30] involving a few dozen tiny unmanned aircraft used for a simulated reconnaissance mission. Future experiments could involve hundreds of drones, and the potential uses of the swarms are numerous. Carrying electronic warfare jammers, they could be used to confuse and overwhelm an enemy’s defenses before a more complex operation. Or they could simply be flown into the intakes of fighter jets to disable them. More uses for drone swarms will likely emerge in the future.

Evolving exoskeletons

This month, Norinco—a state-owned maker of armored vehicles—introduced a second-generation exoskeleton[31] designed for China’s infantry. Wearing the battery-powered body brace, a soldier can carry around about 100 lbs (45 kg) of weapons, ammo, and supplies. Compared to an earlier version introduced in 2015, this upgrade has a better battery, a streamlined harness, and stronger hydraulic and pneumatic actuators. It’s also lighter, which further improves battery performance. Future versions could include body armor. Meanwhile, the China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation has been showing off its own exoskeleton to naval military leaders: Supporting China’s maritime ambitions, after all, will entail loading plenty of cargo onto ships and planes.

References

  1. ^ visited a satellite launch site (www.xinhuanet.com)
  2. ^ highlighted notable advances (qz.com)
  3. ^ successful maiden flight (newatlas.com)
  4. ^ fortifying remote outposts (www.theguardian.com)
  5. ^ biggest of its kind in the world (www.scmp.com)
  6. ^ reported last month (www.scmp.com)
  7. ^ assist the decision-making (www.scmp.com)
  8. ^ in August 2016 (www.theguardian.com)
  9. ^ plans to open (www.popsci.com)
  10. ^ warned lawmakers (www.channelnewsasia.com)
  11. ^ first homegrown aircraft carrier (www.scmp.com)
  12. ^ electromagnetic catapult (www.scmp.com)
  13. ^ developing the Shaanxi KJ-600 (www.scmp.com)
  14. ^ at long range, (www.popsci.com)
  15. ^ deployed to Japan (edition.cnn.com)
  16. ^ less-advanced (www.defensenews.com)
  17. ^ goes beyond catapults (www.popsci.com)
  18. ^ reported by the Drive (www.thedrive.com)
  19. ^ soon emerged (www.thedrive.com)
  20. ^ tested experimental railguns (www.thedrive.com)
  21. ^ reaching speeds of (news.usni.org)
  22. ^ use powerful magnetic fields (www.popsci.com)
  23. ^ prevent their proliferation (www.rand.org)
  24. ^ reported by the Diplomat (thediplomat.com)
  25. ^ stop short of entering space (www.popularmechanics.com)
  26. ^ operational by 2020 (www.scmp.com)
  27. ^ reported in January (www.scmp.com)
  28. ^ scientific research only (www.ecns.cn)
  29. ^ clearly a military base. (qz.com)
  30. ^ conducted a test (www.thedrive.com)
  31. ^ second-generation exoskeleton (www.popsci.com)