Tagged: aid

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The military is looking for ways to slow down 'biological time' in order to save wounded soldiers

US Army soldiers evacuate a simulated casualty during training at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, June 12, 2016.
Sgt. Stephen J. Schmitz/US Army[1]
  • The military, concerned about conflict with a more capable foe, is looking to ensure the “golden hour” for wounded troops.
  • DARPA’s latest initiative, a program looking for ways to slow down the body’s biological processes, is part of efforts to extend that period.
  • The program is still very young, but the military has spearheaded other medical advances in the past.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is looking at ways to change how the human body manages time in order to improve wounded soldiers’ chances of survival and recovery.

DARPA has set up the Biostasis program[2] to use molecular biology as a way to evaluate and possibly alter the speed at which living systems operate with the goal of extending the window of time between a damaging event and the collapse of those systems.

Such an extension would expand the “golden hour[3]” — the period of time between injury or infection and the first treatment that is regarded as one of the most important factors in saving a life on the battlefield.

“At the molecular level, life is a set of continuous biochemical reactions, and a defining characteristic of these reactions is that they need a catalyst to occur at all,” Tristan McClure-Begley, the Biostasis program manager, said in a DARPA release[4].

“Within a cell, these catalysts come in the form of proteins and large molecular machines that transform chemical and kinetic energy into biological processes,” he added.

DARPA’s Biostasis program is looking at ways to sloe the body’s biological processes to aid medical treatment.
DARPA[5]

“Our goal with Biostasis is to control those molecular machines and get them to all slow their roll at about the same rate so that we can slow down the entire system gracefully and avoid adverse consequences when the intervention is reversed or wears off,” McClure-Begley said.

The Defense Department policy that ensures wounded troops are moved off the battlefield for care within the first hour after injury has been credited with the military’s nearly 98% survival rate[6], Rear Adm. Colin G. Chinn, Joint Staff surgeon, said in mid-February.

But the Pentagon’s shifting focus to near-peer adversaries — ones with considerable firepower and air capabilities — have raised questions about whether the golden hour can endure in future conflicts.

The Army is looking at additional training for medics[7] to allow them to provide care beyond the initial triage stage, bridging the gap between a combat medic’s basic knowledge and that of a professional stationed at a battlefield aid station.

DARPA’s initiative, still nascent, is looking for biochemical approaches that control how cells use energy at the level of proteins, using examples from nature of organisms that can survive in extreme conditions and drastically reducing or shutting down their metabolic processes.

“If we can figure out the best ways to bolster other biological systems and make them less likely to enter a runaway downward spiral after being damaged, then we will have made a significant addition to the biology toolbox,” McClure-Begley said[8].

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Right now, the Biostasis program is focused on developing and testing proof-of-concept technologies. Similar Biostasis technologies could yield other medical benefits by reducing reaction times and extending the shelf life of blood and other biological products.

The US military is looking at other ways to boost the body’s ability to respond to and recovery from injury.

Earlier this year, doctors and researchers at the Military Health System Research Symposium discussed regenerative medicine and its uses — in particular the possibility of regenerating limbs[9], muscles, and nerve tissue.

“We’re not quite there yet,” said Army Lt. Col. David Saunders, extremity repair product manager for the US Army Medical Materiel Development Activity. “What we’re trying to do is develop a toolkit for our trauma and reconstructive surgeons out of various regenerative medicine products as they emerge to improve long-term outcomes in function and form of injured extremities.”

US Army flight medic Sgt. Ian Bugh prepares an IV drip en route to pick up a wounded Marine in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, August 17, 2010.
Thomson Reuters

Saunders added that there had been progress in using synthetic grafts to spark the regrowth of muscle, nerve, vascular, and connective tissues.

The research discussed[10] at the symposium included efforts to use fillers to help damaged bones recover and the examination of the African spiny mouse, which has the ability to shed skin to escape predators and recover scar-free relatively quickly.

“Extremity wounds are increasingly survivable due to the implementation of body armor and damage-control surgeries,” Saunders said[11]. “[There are] many wonderful things emerging in the field of regenerative medicine to restore form and function to our wounded warfighters.”

The technologies in question are far from practical application. But the military, working under wartime imperatives, has made rapid medical advances in the past. In the run-up to World War II, an Army commission secured FDA approval for a flu vaccine[12]— the first one in the US — in just two years.

References

  1. ^ Sgt. Stephen J. Schmitz/US Army (www.flickr.com)
  2. ^ the Biostasis program (www.darpa.mil)
  3. ^ golden hour (www.militarytimes.com)
  4. ^ release (www.darpa.mil)
  5. ^ DARPA (www.darpa.mil)
  6. ^ 98% survival rate (www.militarytimes.com)
  7. ^ additional training for medics (www.militarytimes.com)
  8. ^ said (www.darpa.mil)
  9. ^ regenerating limbs (www.businessinsider.com)
  10. ^ research discussed (www.businessinsider.com)
  11. ^ said (www.businessinsider.com)
  12. ^ approval for a flu vaccine (www.businessinsider.com)
0

The military is looking for ways to slow down 'biological time' in order to save wounded soldiers

US Army soldiers evacuate a simulated casualty during training at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, June 12, 2016.
Sgt. Stephen J. Schmitz/US Army[1]
  • The military, concerned about conflict with a more capable foe, is looking to ensure the “golden hour” for wounded troops.
  • DARPA’s latest initiative, a program looking for ways to slow down the body’s biological processes, is part of efforts to extend that period.
  • The program is still very young, but the military has spearheaded other medical advances in the past.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is looking at ways to change how the human body manages time in order to improve wounded soldiers’ chances of survival and recovery.

DARPA has set up the Biostasis program[2] to use molecular biology as a way to evaluate and possibly alter the speed at which living systems operate with the goal of extending the window of time between a damaging event and the collapse of those systems.

Such an extension would expand the “golden hour[3]” — the period of time between injury or infection and the first treatment that is regarded as one of the most important factors in saving a life on the battlefield.

“At the molecular level, life is a set of continuous biochemical reactions, and a defining characteristic of these reactions is that they need a catalyst to occur at all,” Tristan McClure-Begley, the Biostasis program manager, said in a DARPA release[4].

“Within a cell, these catalysts come in the form of proteins and large molecular machines that transform chemical and kinetic energy into biological processes,” he added.

DARPA’s Biostasis program is looking at ways to sloe the body’s biological processes to aid medical treatment.
DARPA[5]

“Our goal with Biostasis is to control those molecular machines and get them to all slow their roll at about the same rate so that we can slow down the entire system gracefully and avoid adverse consequences when the intervention is reversed or wears off,” McClure-Begley said.

The Defense Department policy that ensures wounded troops are moved off the battlefield for care within the first hour after injury has been credited with the military’s nearly 98% survival rate[6], Rear Adm. Colin G. Chinn, Joint Staff surgeon, said in mid-February.

But the Pentagon’s shifting focus to near-peer adversaries — ones with considerable firepower and air capabilities — have raised questions about whether the golden hour can endure in future conflicts.

The Army is looking at additional training for medics[7] to allow them to provide care beyond the initial triage stage, bridging the gap between a combat medic’s basic knowledge and that of a professional stationed at a battlefield aid station.

DARPA’s initiative, still nascent, is looking for biochemical approaches that control how cells use energy at the level of proteins, using examples from nature of organisms that can survive in extreme conditions and drastically reducing or shutting down their metabolic processes.

“If we can figure out the best ways to bolster other biological systems and make them less likely to enter a runaway downward spiral after being damaged, then we will have made a significant addition to the biology toolbox,” McClure-Begley said[8].

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Right now, the Biostasis program is focused on developing and testing proof-of-concept technologies. Similar Biostasis technologies could yield other medical benefits by reducing reaction times and extending the shelf life of blood and other biological products.

The US military is looking at other ways to boost the body’s ability to respond to and recovery from injury.

Earlier this year, doctors and researchers at the Military Health System Research Symposium discussed regenerative medicine and its uses — in particular the possibility of regenerating limbs[9], muscles, and nerve tissue.

“We’re not quite there yet,” said Army Lt. Col. David Saunders, extremity repair product manager for the US Army Medical Materiel Development Activity. “What we’re trying to do is develop a toolkit for our trauma and reconstructive surgeons out of various regenerative medicine products as they emerge to improve long-term outcomes in function and form of injured extremities.”

US Army flight medic Sgt. Ian Bugh prepares an IV drip en route to pick up a wounded Marine in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, August 17, 2010.
Thomson Reuters

Saunders added that there had been progress in using synthetic grafts to spark the regrowth of muscle, nerve, vascular, and connective tissues.

The research discussed[10] at the symposium included efforts to use fillers to help damaged bones recover and the examination of the African spiny mouse, which has the ability to shed skin to escape predators and recover scar-free relatively quickly.

“Extremity wounds are increasingly survivable due to the implementation of body armor and damage-control surgeries,” Saunders said[11]. “[There are] many wonderful things emerging in the field of regenerative medicine to restore form and function to our wounded warfighters.”

The technologies in question are far from practical application. But the military, working under wartime imperatives, has made rapid medical advances in the past. In the run-up to World War II, an Army commission secured FDA approval for a flu vaccine[12]— the first one in the US — in just two years.

References

  1. ^ Sgt. Stephen J. Schmitz/US Army (www.flickr.com)
  2. ^ the Biostasis program (www.darpa.mil)
  3. ^ golden hour (www.militarytimes.com)
  4. ^ release (www.darpa.mil)
  5. ^ DARPA (www.darpa.mil)
  6. ^ 98% survival rate (www.militarytimes.com)
  7. ^ additional training for medics (www.militarytimes.com)
  8. ^ said (www.darpa.mil)
  9. ^ regenerating limbs (www.businessinsider.com)
  10. ^ research discussed (www.businessinsider.com)
  11. ^ said (www.businessinsider.com)
  12. ^ approval for a flu vaccine (www.businessinsider.com)
0

The military is looking for ways to slow down 'biological time' in order to save wounded soldiers

US Army soldiers evacuate a simulated casualty during training at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, June 12, 2016.
Sgt. Stephen J. Schmitz/US Army[1]
  • The military, concerned about conflict with a more capable foe, is looking to ensure the “golden hour” for wounded troops.
  • DARPA’s latest initiative, a program looking for ways to slow down the body’s biological processes, is part of efforts to extend that period.
  • The program is still very young, but the military has spearheaded other medical advances in the past.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is looking at ways to change how the human body manages time in order to improve wounded soldiers’ chances of survival and recovery.

DARPA has set up the Biostasis program[2] to use molecular biology as a way to evaluate and possibly alter the speed at which living systems operate with the goal of extending the window of time between a damaging event and the collapse of those systems.

Such an extension would expand the “golden hour[3]” — the period of time between injury or infection and the first treatment that is regarded as one of the most important factors in saving a life on the battlefield.

“At the molecular level, life is a set of continuous biochemical reactions, and a defining characteristic of these reactions is that they need a catalyst to occur at all,” Tristan McClure-Begley, the Biostasis program manager, said in a DARPA release[4].

“Within a cell, these catalysts come in the form of proteins and large molecular machines that transform chemical and kinetic energy into biological processes,” he added.

DARPA’s Biostasis program is looking at ways to sloe the body’s biological processes to aid medical treatment.
DARPA[5]

“Our goal with Biostasis is to control those molecular machines and get them to all slow their roll at about the same rate so that we can slow down the entire system gracefully and avoid adverse consequences when the intervention is reversed or wears off,” McClure-Begley said.

The Defense Department policy that ensures wounded troops are moved off the battlefield for care within the first hour after injury has been credited with the military’s nearly 98% survival rate[6], Rear Adm. Colin G. Chinn, Joint Staff surgeon, said in mid-February.

But the Pentagon’s shifting focus to near-peer adversaries — ones with considerable firepower and air capabilities — have raised questions about whether the golden hour can endure in future conflicts.

The Army is looking at additional training for medics[7] to allow them to provide care beyond the initial triage stage, bridging the gap between a combat medic’s basic knowledge and that of a professional stationed at a battlefield aid station.

DARPA’s initiative, still nascent, is looking for biochemical approaches that control how cells use energy at the level of proteins, using examples from nature of organisms that can survive in extreme conditions and drastically reducing or shutting down their metabolic processes.

“If we can figure out the best ways to bolster other biological systems and make them less likely to enter a runaway downward spiral after being damaged, then we will have made a significant addition to the biology toolbox,” McClure-Begley said[8].

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Right now, the Biostasis program is focused on developing and testing proof-of-concept technologies. Similar Biostasis technologies could yield other medical benefits by reducing reaction times and extending the shelf life of blood and other biological products.

The US military is looking at other ways to boost the body’s ability to respond to and recovery from injury.

Earlier this year, doctors and researchers at the Military Health System Research Symposium discussed regenerative medicine and its uses — in particular the possibility of regenerating limbs[9], muscles, and nerve tissue.

“We’re not quite there yet,” said Army Lt. Col. David Saunders, extremity repair product manager for the US Army Medical Materiel Development Activity. “What we’re trying to do is develop a toolkit for our trauma and reconstructive surgeons out of various regenerative medicine products as they emerge to improve long-term outcomes in function and form of injured extremities.”

US Army flight medic Sgt. Ian Bugh prepares an IV drip en route to pick up a wounded Marine in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, August 17, 2010.
Thomson Reuters

Saunders added that there had been progress in using synthetic grafts to spark the regrowth of muscle, nerve, vascular, and connective tissues.

The research discussed[10] at the symposium included efforts to use fillers to help damaged bones recover and the examination of the African spiny mouse, which has the ability to shed skin to escape predators and recover scar-free relatively quickly.

“Extremity wounds are increasingly survivable due to the implementation of body armor and damage-control surgeries,” Saunders said[11]. “[There are] many wonderful things emerging in the field of regenerative medicine to restore form and function to our wounded warfighters.”

The technologies in question are far from practical application. But the military, working under wartime imperatives, has made rapid medical advances in the past. In the run-up to World War II, an Army commission secured FDA approval for a flu vaccine[12]— the first one in the US — in just two years.

References

  1. ^ Sgt. Stephen J. Schmitz/US Army (www.flickr.com)
  2. ^ the Biostasis program (www.darpa.mil)
  3. ^ golden hour (www.militarytimes.com)
  4. ^ release (www.darpa.mil)
  5. ^ DARPA (www.darpa.mil)
  6. ^ 98% survival rate (www.militarytimes.com)
  7. ^ additional training for medics (www.militarytimes.com)
  8. ^ said (www.darpa.mil)
  9. ^ regenerating limbs (www.businessinsider.com)
  10. ^ research discussed (www.businessinsider.com)
  11. ^ said (www.businessinsider.com)
  12. ^ approval for a flu vaccine (www.businessinsider.com)
0

The military is looking for ways to slow down 'biological time' in order to save wounded soldiers

US Army soldiers evacuate a simulated casualty during training at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, June 12, 2016.
Sgt. Stephen J. Schmitz/US Army[1]
  • The military, concerned about conflict with a more capable foe, is looking to ensure the “golden hour” for wounded troops.
  • DARPA’s latest initiative, a program looking for ways to slow down the body’s biological processes, is part of efforts to extend that period.
  • The program is still very young, but the military has spearheaded other medical advances in the past.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is looking at ways to change how the human body manages time in order to improve wounded soldiers’ chances of survival and recovery.

DARPA has set up the Biostasis program[2] to use molecular biology as a way to evaluate and possibly alter the speed at which living systems operate with the goal of extending the window of time between a damaging event and the collapse of those systems.

Such an extension would expand the “golden hour[3]” — the period of time between injury or infection and the first treatment that is regarded as one of the most important factors in saving a life on the battlefield.

“At the molecular level, life is a set of continuous biochemical reactions, and a defining characteristic of these reactions is that they need a catalyst to occur at all,” Tristan McClure-Begley, the Biostasis program manager, said in a DARPA release[4].

“Within a cell, these catalysts come in the form of proteins and large molecular machines that transform chemical and kinetic energy into biological processes,” he added.

DARPA’s Biostasis program is looking at ways to sloe the body’s biological processes to aid medical treatment.
DARPA[5]

“Our goal with Biostasis is to control those molecular machines and get them to all slow their roll at about the same rate so that we can slow down the entire system gracefully and avoid adverse consequences when the intervention is reversed or wears off,” McClure-Begley said.

The Defense Department policy that ensures wounded troops are moved off the battlefield for care within the first hour after injury has been credited with the military’s nearly 98% survival rate[6], Rear Adm. Colin G. Chinn, Joint Staff surgeon, said in mid-February.

But the Pentagon’s shifting focus to near-peer adversaries — ones with considerable firepower and air capabilities — have raised questions about whether the golden hour can endure in future conflicts.

The Army is looking at additional training for medics[7] to allow them to provide care beyond the initial triage stage, bridging the gap between a combat medic’s basic knowledge and that of a professional stationed at a battlefield aid station.

DARPA’s initiative, still nascent, is looking for biochemical approaches that control how cells use energy at the level of proteins, using examples from nature of organisms that can survive in extreme conditions and drastically reducing or shutting down their metabolic processes.

“If we can figure out the best ways to bolster other biological systems and make them less likely to enter a runaway downward spiral after being damaged, then we will have made a significant addition to the biology toolbox,” McClure-Begley said[8].

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Right now, the Biostasis program is focused on developing and testing proof-of-concept technologies. Similar Biostasis technologies could yield other medical benefits by reducing reaction times and extending the shelf life of blood and other biological products.

The US military is looking at other ways to boost the body’s ability to respond to and recovery from injury.

Earlier this year, doctors and researchers at the Military Health System Research Symposium discussed regenerative medicine and its uses — in particular the possibility of regenerating limbs[9], muscles, and nerve tissue.

“We’re not quite there yet,” said Army Lt. Col. David Saunders, extremity repair product manager for the US Army Medical Materiel Development Activity. “What we’re trying to do is develop a toolkit for our trauma and reconstructive surgeons out of various regenerative medicine products as they emerge to improve long-term outcomes in function and form of injured extremities.”

US Army flight medic Sgt. Ian Bugh prepares an IV drip en route to pick up a wounded Marine in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, August 17, 2010.
Thomson Reuters

Saunders added that there had been progress in using synthetic grafts to spark the regrowth of muscle, nerve, vascular, and connective tissues.

The research discussed[10] at the symposium included efforts to use fillers to help damaged bones recover and the examination of the African spiny mouse, which has the ability to shed skin to escape predators and recover scar-free relatively quickly.

“Extremity wounds are increasingly survivable due to the implementation of body armor and damage-control surgeries,” Saunders said[11]. “[There are] many wonderful things emerging in the field of regenerative medicine to restore form and function to our wounded warfighters.”

The technologies in question are far from practical application. But the military, working under wartime imperatives, has made rapid medical advances in the past. In the run-up to World War II, an Army commission secured FDA approval for a flu vaccine[12]— the first one in the US — in just two years.

References

  1. ^ Sgt. Stephen J. Schmitz/US Army (www.flickr.com)
  2. ^ the Biostasis program (www.darpa.mil)
  3. ^ golden hour (www.militarytimes.com)
  4. ^ release (www.darpa.mil)
  5. ^ DARPA (www.darpa.mil)
  6. ^ 98% survival rate (www.militarytimes.com)
  7. ^ additional training for medics (www.militarytimes.com)
  8. ^ said (www.darpa.mil)
  9. ^ regenerating limbs (www.businessinsider.com)
  10. ^ research discussed (www.businessinsider.com)
  11. ^ said (www.businessinsider.com)
  12. ^ approval for a flu vaccine (www.businessinsider.com)
0

The military is looking for ways to slow down 'biological time' in order to save wounded soldiers

US Army soldiers evacuate a simulated casualty during training at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, June 12, 2016.
Sgt. Stephen J. Schmitz/US Army[1]
  • The military, concerned about conflict with a more capable foe, is looking to ensure the “golden hour” for wounded troops.
  • DARPA’s latest initiative, a program looking for ways to slow down the body’s biological processes, is part of efforts to extend that period.
  • The program is still very young, but the military has spearheaded other medical advances in the past.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is looking at ways to change how the human body manages time in order to improve wounded soldiers’ chances of survival and recovery.

DARPA has set up the Biostasis program[2] to use molecular biology as a way to evaluate and possibly alter the speed at which living systems operate with the goal of extending the window of time between a damaging event and the collapse of those systems.

Such an extension would expand the “golden hour[3]” — the period of time between injury or infection and the first treatment that is regarded as one of the most important factors in saving a life on the battlefield.

“At the molecular level, life is a set of continuous biochemical reactions, and a defining characteristic of these reactions is that they need a catalyst to occur at all,” Tristan McClure-Begley, the Biostasis program manager, said in a DARPA release[4].

“Within a cell, these catalysts come in the form of proteins and large molecular machines that transform chemical and kinetic energy into biological processes,” he added.

DARPA’s Biostasis program is looking at ways to sloe the body’s biological processes to aid medical treatment.
DARPA[5]

“Our goal with Biostasis is to control those molecular machines and get them to all slow their roll at about the same rate so that we can slow down the entire system gracefully and avoid adverse consequences when the intervention is reversed or wears off,” McClure-Begley said.

The Defense Department policy that ensures wounded troops are moved off the battlefield for care within the first hour after injury has been credited with the military’s nearly 98% survival rate[6], Rear Adm. Colin G. Chinn, Joint Staff surgeon, said in mid-February.

But the Pentagon’s shifting focus to near-peer adversaries — ones with considerable firepower and air capabilities — have raised questions about whether the golden hour can endure in future conflicts.

The Army is looking at additional training for medics[7] to allow them to provide care beyond the initial triage stage, bridging the gap between a combat medic’s basic knowledge and that of a professional stationed at a battlefield aid station.

DARPA’s initiative, still nascent, is looking for biochemical approaches that control how cells use energy at the level of proteins, using examples from nature of organisms that can survive in extreme conditions and drastically reducing or shutting down their metabolic processes.

“If we can figure out the best ways to bolster other biological systems and make them less likely to enter a runaway downward spiral after being damaged, then we will have made a significant addition to the biology toolbox,” McClure-Begley said[8].

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Right now, the Biostasis program is focused on developing and testing proof-of-concept technologies. Similar Biostasis technologies could yield other medical benefits by reducing reaction times and extending the shelf life of blood and other biological products.

The US military is looking at other ways to boost the body’s ability to respond to and recovery from injury.

Earlier this year, doctors and researchers at the Military Health System Research Symposium discussed regenerative medicine and its uses — in particular the possibility of regenerating limbs[9], muscles, and nerve tissue.

“We’re not quite there yet,” said Army Lt. Col. David Saunders, extremity repair product manager for the US Army Medical Materiel Development Activity. “What we’re trying to do is develop a toolkit for our trauma and reconstructive surgeons out of various regenerative medicine products as they emerge to improve long-term outcomes in function and form of injured extremities.”

US Army flight medic Sgt. Ian Bugh prepares an IV drip en route to pick up a wounded Marine in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, August 17, 2010.
Thomson Reuters

Saunders added that there had been progress in using synthetic grafts to spark the regrowth of muscle, nerve, vascular, and connective tissues.

The research discussed[10] at the symposium included efforts to use fillers to help damaged bones recover and the examination of the African spiny mouse, which has the ability to shed skin to escape predators and recover scar-free relatively quickly.

“Extremity wounds are increasingly survivable due to the implementation of body armor and damage-control surgeries,” Saunders said[11]. “[There are] many wonderful things emerging in the field of regenerative medicine to restore form and function to our wounded warfighters.”

The technologies in question are far from practical application. But the military, working under wartime imperatives, has made rapid medical advances in the past. In the run-up to World War II, an Army commission secured FDA approval for a flu vaccine[12]— the first one in the US — in just two years.

References

  1. ^ Sgt. Stephen J. Schmitz/US Army (www.flickr.com)
  2. ^ the Biostasis program (www.darpa.mil)
  3. ^ golden hour (www.militarytimes.com)
  4. ^ release (www.darpa.mil)
  5. ^ DARPA (www.darpa.mil)
  6. ^ 98% survival rate (www.militarytimes.com)
  7. ^ additional training for medics (www.militarytimes.com)
  8. ^ said (www.darpa.mil)
  9. ^ regenerating limbs (www.businessinsider.com)
  10. ^ research discussed (www.businessinsider.com)
  11. ^ said (www.businessinsider.com)
  12. ^ approval for a flu vaccine (www.businessinsider.com)
0

After reports of chemical attacks, White House considers new military action against Syrian regime

The Trump administration has considered new military action against the Syrian government in response to reports of ongoing chemical weapons use, officials said, raising the prospect of a second U.S. strike on President Bashar al-Assad in less than a year.

President Trump requested options for punishing the Assad government after reported chlorine gas attacks — at least seven this year — and possibly other chemicals affecting civilians in opposition-controlled areas.

In a Feb. 25 incident, residents and medical staffers in a rebel-held Damascus suburb, Eastern Ghouta, described symptoms associated with chlorine exposure. One child died, medical staffers reported.

The president discussed potential actions early last week at a White House meeting that included Chief of Staff John F. Kelly, national security adviser H.R. McMaster and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, officials said.

One official, who like others spoke on the condition of anonymity to address internal deliberations, said that the president did not endorse any military action and that officials decided to continue monitoring the situation.

Dana White, chief Pentagon spokeswoman, denied that Mattis took part in discussions about military action in Syria and said the “conversation did not happen.”

One senior administration official said that Mattis was “adamantly” against acting militarily in response to the recent chlorine attacks and that McMaster “was for it.”

The prospect of renewed military action, even if tabled for now, underscores the explosiveness of a conflict that has become a battlefield for rivalries between Russia and Iran on one side and the United States and its allies on the other.

The White House discussions come amid a drumbeat of accusations from Trump administration officials, who have sought to galvanize international pressure on Syria over repeated small-scale chemical attacks amid an escalation of widespread conventional air and ground assaults that have killed hundreds of civilians in recent weeks.

On Monday, the Assad government allowed a U.N. aid convoy to deliver food and other aid, but not certain medical supplies, to Eastern Ghouta, even as shelling and airstrikes continued.

The Trump administration has condemned Iran for deploying weapons and fighters that have helped turn the war in Assad’s favor. It has also blamed Russia for failing to enforce a U.N.-backed cease-fire proposal and for allowing the use of chemical weapons to continue.

“The civilized world must not tolerate the Assad regime’s continued use of chemical weapons,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement Sunday.

Russian and Syrian officials have rejected reports of government chemical weapons use.

Images of Syrians suffering the effects of chemical exposure appear to have energized the president to explore launching a new assault, as they did before the missile attack he authorized on a Syrian air base in April.

Trump ordered the Pentagon to fire Tomahawk missiles[1] on the Syrian facility believed to be linked to a sarin gas attack that killed 80 people. It was the first direct American assault on the Assad government, a step that President Barack Obama had shied away from, even after an estimated 1,400 people were killed in a gruesome attack[2] in August 2013.

[New chemical attacks reported in Syria, and Trump administration blames Russia[3]]

Administration officials say Syria has continued to make and employ chemical weapons despite an internationally backed deal[4] to remove its stockpiles after the 2013 incident.

According to the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS), which tracks reports from medical staffers, patients have reported symptoms linked to chlorine exposure seven times this year. In November, also in Eastern Ghouta, hospitals described seeing patients with symptoms indicative of sarin, the society said.

Unlike with earlier deadly incidents, U.S. officials say, the Assad regime is now conducting only small-scale attacks and is relying mainly on chlorine, which is made from commercially available materials and is more difficult to detect than nerve agents such as sarin.

“They clearly think they can get away with this if they keep it under a certain level,” a senior administration official told reporters last month.

Officials also suspect Syria of using ground-based systems rather than aerial means for delivering chemical agents, because they are harder to track.

The Syrian government has resorted to such attacks, officials say, to compensate for manpower shortages and to discourage supporters of the opposition from returning to strategic areas.

Even as the U.S. military winds down its campaign against the Islamic State, the Trump administration risks being more deeply drawn into Syria’s civil war, in which NATO ally Turkey is another important player. Many U.S. officials say that only greater political stability can prevent the extremists’ return.

The Pentagon has sought to keep its mission in Syria tightly focused on the Islamic State. There are about 2,000 U.S. troops in the east and north, tasked with advising local forces who have been battling the extremists.

[Trump administration: Syria probably continuing to make, use chemical weapons[5]]

Some officials also have raised concerns about conclusively assigning responsibility for chlorine attacks. Others express skepticism that another strike would deter Assad when the last one did not.

But other officials, particularly at the White House and the State Department, appear more open to renewed action against Assad. They say that a U.S. response might deter the Assad regime from rebuilding its chemical arsenal in a way that might eventually threaten the United States and might demonstrate that the United States will not be deterred by Russia’s presence in Syria.

The discussions highlight the gray area that chlorine has occupied in the West’s response to chemical weapons use in Syria. While chlorine is not a banned substance, its use as a choking agent is prohibited under international chemical weapons rules.

The Assad government’s reported employment of chlorine has been much less lethal than that of sarin, at least in recent reported incidents in Syria. SAMS said two people had been killed in the seven attacks this year.

Mattis told reporters last month that the United States was seeking evidence[6] of renewed sarin use.

Fred Hof, an Obama administration official who is now at the Atlantic Council, said the United States would send a “deadly” message if it lashes out after chemical attacks but does nothing when civilians are killed with conventional arms.

“When we go out of our way to say, in effect, the only time we will lift a finger to protect Syrian civilians is when particularly deadly chemical weapons are employed, we are inadvertently — unintentionally but inevitably — encouraging the Assad regime, the Russians and the Iranians to attack civilians with everything at their disposal,” he said.

Even if Trump authorizes another attack, the Pentagon is likely to advocate limiting U.S. involvement in the war. The April attack, which included 59 cruise missiles, was aimed narrowly at an isolated airfield, minimizing the likelihood of tit-for-tat escalations.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is investigating whether chlorine was used in recent attacks in Eastern Ghouta, Reuters reported.

Greg Jaffe in Washington and Louisa Loveluck in Beirut contributed to this report.

References

  1. ^ fire Tomahawk missiles (www.washingtonpost.com)
  2. ^ gruesome attack (www.washingtonpost.com)
  3. ^ New chemical attacks reported in Syria, and Trump administration blames Russia (www.washingtonpost.com)
  4. ^ internationally backed deal (www.washingtonpost.com)
  5. ^ Trump administration: Syria probably continuing to make, use chemical weapons (www.washingtonpost.com)
  6. ^ seeking evidence (www.reuters.com)
0

After reports of chemical attacks, White House considers new military action against Syrian regime

The Trump administration has considered new military action against the Syrian government in response to reports of ongoing chemical weapons use, officials said, raising the prospect of a second U.S. strike on President Bashar al-Assad in less than a year.

President Trump requested options for punishing the Assad government after reported chlorine gas attacks — at least seven this year — and possibly other chemicals affecting civilians in opposition-controlled areas.

In a Feb. 25 incident, residents and medical staffers in a rebel-held Damascus suburb, Eastern Ghouta, described symptoms associated with chlorine exposure. One child died, medical staffers reported.

The president discussed potential actions early last week at a White House meeting that included Chief of Staff John F. Kelly, national security adviser H.R. McMaster and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, officials said.

One official, who like others spoke on the condition of anonymity to address internal deliberations, said that the president did not endorse any military action and that officials decided to continue monitoring the situation.

Dana White, chief Pentagon spokeswoman, denied that Mattis took part in discussions about military action in Syria and said the “conversation did not happen.”

One senior administration official said that Mattis was “adamantly” against acting militarily in response to the recent chlorine attacks and that McMaster “was for it.”

The prospect of renewed military action, even if tabled for now, underscores the explosiveness of a conflict that has become a battlefield for rivalries between Russia and Iran on one side and the United States and its allies on the other.

The White House discussions come amid a drumbeat of accusations from Trump administration officials, who have sought to galvanize international pressure on Syria over repeated small-scale chemical attacks amid an escalation of widespread conventional air and ground assaults that have killed hundreds of civilians in recent weeks.

On Monday, the Assad government allowed a U.N. aid convoy to deliver food and other aid, but not certain medical supplies, to Eastern Ghouta, even as shelling and airstrikes continued.

The Trump administration has condemned Iran for deploying weapons and fighters that have helped turn the war in Assad’s favor. It has also blamed Russia for failing to enforce a U.N.-backed cease-fire proposal and for allowing the use of chemical weapons to continue.

“The civilized world must not tolerate the Assad regime’s continued use of chemical weapons,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement Sunday.

Russian and Syrian officials have rejected reports of government chemical weapons use.

Images of Syrians suffering the effects of chemical exposure appear to have energized the president to explore launching a new assault, as they did before the missile attack he authorized on a Syrian air base in April.

Trump ordered the Pentagon to fire Tomahawk missiles[1] on the Syrian facility believed to be linked to a sarin gas attack that killed 80 people. It was the first direct American assault on the Assad government, a step that President Barack Obama had shied away from, even after an estimated 1,400 people were killed in a gruesome attack[2] in August 2013.

[New chemical attacks reported in Syria, and Trump administration blames Russia[3]]

Administration officials say Syria has continued to make and employ chemical weapons despite an internationally backed deal[4] to remove its stockpiles after the 2013 incident.

According to the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS), which tracks reports from medical staffers, patients have reported symptoms linked to chlorine exposure seven times this year. In November, also in Eastern Ghouta, hospitals described seeing patients with symptoms indicative of sarin, the society said.

Unlike with earlier deadly incidents, U.S. officials say, the Assad regime is now conducting only small-scale attacks and is relying mainly on chlorine, which is made from commercially available materials and is more difficult to detect than nerve agents such as sarin.

“They clearly think they can get away with this if they keep it under a certain level,” a senior administration official told reporters last month.

Officials also suspect Syria of using ground-based systems rather than aerial means for delivering chemical agents, because they are harder to track.

The Syrian government has resorted to such attacks, officials say, to compensate for manpower shortages and to discourage supporters of the opposition from returning to strategic areas.

Even as the U.S. military winds down its campaign against the Islamic State, the Trump administration risks being more deeply drawn into Syria’s civil war, in which NATO ally Turkey is another important player. Many U.S. officials say that only greater political stability can prevent the extremists’ return.

The Pentagon has sought to keep its mission in Syria tightly focused on the Islamic State. There are about 2,000 U.S. troops in the east and north, tasked with advising local forces who have been battling the extremists.

[Trump administration: Syria probably continuing to make, use chemical weapons[5]]

Some officials also have raised concerns about conclusively assigning responsibility for chlorine attacks. Others express skepticism that another strike would deter Assad when the last one did not.

But other officials, particularly at the White House and the State Department, appear more open to renewed action against Assad. They say that a U.S. response might deter the Assad regime from rebuilding its chemical arsenal in a way that might eventually threaten the United States and might demonstrate that the United States will not be deterred by Russia’s presence in Syria.

The discussions highlight the gray area that chlorine has occupied in the West’s response to chemical weapons use in Syria. While chlorine is not a banned substance, its use as a choking agent is prohibited under international chemical weapons rules.

The Assad government’s reported employment of chlorine has been much less lethal than that of sarin, at least in recent reported incidents in Syria. SAMS said two people had been killed in the seven attacks this year.

Mattis told reporters last month that the United States was seeking evidence[6] of renewed sarin use.

Fred Hof, an Obama administration official who is now at the Atlantic Council, said the United States would send a “deadly” message if it lashes out after chemical attacks but does nothing when civilians are killed with conventional arms.

“When we go out of our way to say, in effect, the only time we will lift a finger to protect Syrian civilians is when particularly deadly chemical weapons are employed, we are inadvertently — unintentionally but inevitably — encouraging the Assad regime, the Russians and the Iranians to attack civilians with everything at their disposal,” he said.

Even if Trump authorizes another attack, the Pentagon is likely to advocate limiting U.S. involvement in the war. The April attack, which included 59 cruise missiles, was aimed narrowly at an isolated airfield, minimizing the likelihood of tit-for-tat escalations.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is investigating whether chlorine was used in recent attacks in Eastern Ghouta, Reuters reported.

Greg Jaffe in Washington and Louisa Loveluck in Beirut contributed to this report.

References

  1. ^ fire Tomahawk missiles (www.washingtonpost.com)
  2. ^ gruesome attack (www.washingtonpost.com)
  3. ^ New chemical attacks reported in Syria, and Trump administration blames Russia (www.washingtonpost.com)
  4. ^ internationally backed deal (www.washingtonpost.com)
  5. ^ Trump administration: Syria probably continuing to make, use chemical weapons (www.washingtonpost.com)
  6. ^ seeking evidence (www.reuters.com)
0

Rhea Homeland Security Team to hold fundraiser

The Rhea County Sheriff’s Department’s Homeland Security Team is hosting a hot dog/chili fundraiser on March 17 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Rhea County Welcome Center in Dayton.

Homeland Security officials said the event will also feature a silent auction on cakes, pies, tools, knives and more and that a drawing will also be held for a La-Z-Boy recliner.

Officials said the drawing will take place at 12:30 p.m. on the day of the fundraiser and that you do not have to be present to win.

“Our local sheriff’s department’s Homeland Security team is a group that [Rhea County Sheriff Mike Neal] formed himself in 2002,” Homeland Security Director Jim Conner said. “We have used the money from our fundraisers to buy generators, portable lights, safety vests and training equipment.”

Conner said that funds raised at this year’s event will be coupled with half of the funds from last year’s fundraiser to outfit all law enforcement with small trauma kits and tourniquets.

Neal formed the county’s Homeland Security team following the 9/11 tragedy. Neal, foreseeing the need to have trained volunteers ready to step in to assist with emergencies that might deplete the sheriffs department’s resources, formed this group from volunteers interested in helping their community.

Over the past several years, these teams have assisted in the state’s small pox inoculation drill, Watts Bar response drill, evacuation drills at Spring City Elementary School and Rhea Central Elementary School, and have coordinated various Neighborhood Watch programs around the county.

In addition, the team has assisted in search and rescue, crime scene security, security for a variety of public events and has conducted dozens of public services including CPR and first aid classes around the county. The team has also assisted in with various natural disasters within the county including providing medical assistance.

The Homeland Security Team has annual training in handgun qualification, National Weather Service Weather Spotters, OC pepper spray, extendable baton and emergency vehicle operations.

For more information, contact Conner at 423-255-2200 or via email at [email protected][1].

References

  1. ^ [email protected] (www.rheaheraldnews.com)